Philadelphia Phillies Best Players of All Time

The Philadelphia Phillies, established in 1883, are one of the oldest and most iconic franchises in Major League Baseball. Based out of Citizens Bank Park located in South Philadelphia Sports Complex since 2004, they compete as a member team within the National League East division. With their long history and many accomplishments to boast about including two World Series Championships (1980 & 2008) along with seven NL pennants, they have become an integral part of baseball culture throughout the US.

1. Chase Utley

Infielder

Chase Utley Career

  • 6× All-Star (2006–2010, 2014), World Series champion (2008), 4× Silver Slugger Award (2006–2009)

Chase Utley was born on December 17, 1978 in Pasadena, California. He made his MLB debut with the Philadelphia Phillies in 2003 and has since played for the Los Angeles Dodgers, San Francisco Giants, and Washington Nationals.

In 2015 he signed a two-year contract with the Dodgers but announced his retirement at the end of that season. Chase Utley is a versatile second baseman who has averaged around 20 home runs per season throughout his career. He won three Gold Gloves during his time playing in Philadelphia and also received Silver Sluggers from both San Francisco and Washington D C..

His number 16 jersey was retired by the Phillies in 2014 after an illustrious 10-year career with them . Chase Utley is currently an advisor for Major League Baseball's Business Ventures group which aims to help grow youth baseball programs across America

2. Jimmy Rollins

Shortstop

Jimmy Rollins Career

  • 3× All-Star (2001, 2002, 2005), World Series champion (2008), NL MVP (2007), 4× Gold Glove Award (2007–2009, 2012), Silver Slugger Award (2007), Roberto Clemente Award (2014), NL stolen base leader (2001)

Rollins had a successful MLB career with the Phillies and White Sox. Rollins was born in 1978 in Oakland, California and played for both teams until 2016.

Rollins is best known for his batting average (.264) and hits (2,455). Injuries have plagued Rollins throughout his career but he has still managed to remain a productive player.

Rollins will be remembered most for his achievements on the field, as he was one of the top shortstops in baseball over the course of several years. Rollins played for the Philadelphia Phillies from 2000 to 2014.

During his time with the Phillies, Rollins won three All-Star games and one World Series championship. In 2007, Rollins was named MVP of the National League and in 2009 he received a Silver Slugger Award as well as a Gold Glove award.

On January 5th, 2014, Rollins was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers where he has continued to play shortstop since then.

3. Mike Schmidt

Infielder

Mike Schmidt Career

  • 12× All-Star (1974, 1976, 1977, 1979–1984, 1986, 1987, 1989), World Series champion (1980), 3× NL MVP (1980, 1981, 1986), World Series MVP (1980), 10× Gold Glove Award (1976–1984, 1986), 6× Silver Slugger Award (1980–1984, 1986), 8× NL home run leader (1974–1976, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986), 4× NL RBI leader (1980, 1981, 1984, 1986), Hit 4 home runs in one game on April 17, 1976, Philadelphia Phillies No. 20 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Schmidt was an All-Star third baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1972 to 1989. Schmidt led the National League in hits twice, and home runs three times during his career.

Schmidt is one of only five players in MLB history with 2,000 hits and 500 homers. Schmidt won two Gold Glove Awards as a third baseman, in 1976 and 1981. Schmidt was one of the most dominant hitters in MLB history, winning 12 All-Star games and three MVP awards.

Schmidt was also a five-time Gold Glove winner and six-time Silver Slugger recipient. He is also the all-time leader in home runs for Philadelphia Phillies, with 228 career dingers. Schmidt's 4 HRs on April 17, 1976 are still a Phillies record.

4. Steve Carlton

Pitcher

Steve Carlton Career

  • 10× All-Star (1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1977, 1979–1982), 2× World Series champion (1967, 1980), 4× NL Cy Young Award (1972, 1977, 1980, 1982), Triple Crown (1972), Gold Glove Award (1981), 4× NL wins leader (1972, 1977, 1980, 1982), NL ERA leader (1972), 5× NL strikeout leader (1972, 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983), Philadelphia Phillies No. 32 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Carlton was one of the most successful pitchers in baseball history, winning more games than any other pitcher. He is best known for his dominant performances with the St.

Louis Cardinals from 1965 to 1988, helping them win three National League (NL) championships and two World Series titles during that time period. Carlton also played briefly for the Minnesota Twins after leaving St.

Louis and had a respectable career overall, finishing with an NL record 329 wins and 244 losses over 12 seasons. Carlton has been retired since 1988 but remains popular among baseball fans as an ambassador for the sport and advocate for player safety initiatives throughout his career.

In 2010, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, becoming only the third pitcher ever to be enshrined in that prestigious institution following Dizzy Dean and Cy Young

5. Ryan Howard

Infielder

Ryan Howard Career

  • 3× All-Star (2006, 2009, 2010), World Series champion (2008), NL MVP (2006), NL Rookie of the Year (2005), NLCS MVP (2009), Silver Slugger Award (2006), NL Hank Aaron Award (2006), 2× MLB home run leader (2006, 2008), 3× MLB RBI leader (2006, 2008, 2009)

Howard enjoyed a successful MLB career with the Philadelphia Phillies, tallying over 2,000 hits and 100 home runs in his 13-year stint. Howard's best season came in 2007 when he hit .291 with 34 home runs and 117 RBIs.

Injuries hampered Howard throughout most of his later years in the MLB, causing him to retire after 2016 at age 44. After retirement, Howard is focusing on his charity work as director for The Ryan Howard Foundation which raises money for children who have cancer or are going through tough times financially.

A Missouri Tiger fan by birth, Howard attended college at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville before being drafted by the Phillies in 2000 Ryan Howard is a three-time All-Star and World Series champion who was NL MVP in 2006. He led the National League in home runs twice, with 62 in 2006 and 2008; he also finished third in RBIs both years.

In 2009, Howard hit 30 home runs to win the NL Hank Aaron Award as well as being named NLCS MVP after batting .529 with four homers and 10 RBIs over six games. After playing for Philadelphia from 2004 to 2016, Howard signed with the Washington Nationals for 2017 but retired at season's end due to injuries sustained during his final year of play

6. Dick Allen

Dick Allen Career

  • 7× All-Star (1965–1967, 1970, 1972–1974), AL MVP (1972), NL Rookie of the Year (1964), 2× AL home run leader (1972, 1974), AL RBI leader (1972), Philadelphia Phillies No. 15 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Dick Allen was a well-known and popular player in the MLB for over thirty years. He had an impressive batting average, as well as becoming a three-time All Star.

Dick also threw right, which made him one of few players to do so at any level of baseball. Unfortunately, Dick's career ended prematurely due to injuries sustained while playing ball professionally.

However, even after his death in 2020, Dick will remain remembered by many fans for his exceptional play on the field. Dick Allen was an All-Star and MVP catcher in the mid 1970s. He is most famous for his home runs, which he hit at a high rate throughout his career.

Allen also had success batting leadoff for the Phillies, leading them to two World Series appearances in the process. After playing for seven teams over 12 seasons, Dick Allen retired from baseball with 2,583 hits and 351 home runs under his belt.

7. Richie Ashburn

Richie Ashburn Career

  • 6× All-Star (1948, 1951, 1953, 1958, 1962, 1962²), 2× NL batting champion (1955, 1958), NL stolen base leader (1948), Philadelphia Phillies No. 1 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Richie Ashburn was one of the most decorated outfielders in MLB history. He won nine Gold Glove Awards and three Silver Slugger Awards, as well as being named to 10 All-Star teams.

Ashburn led the National League in batting average for four consecutive seasons (1954-1958) and finished second once (1955). He also ranked among the top ten hitters in NL history several other times.

In addition to his prodigious offensive skills, Richie Ashburn was a very good baserunner and a solid defender at both center field and right field. Richie Ashburn retired from baseball after playing just one season with the Mets in 1962 due to an injury sustained while playing winter ball in Venezuela that year.

After retiring from baseball, Richie Ashburn served as a vice president for Major League Baseball until his death on September 9th 1997 at age 70 years old

8. John Kruk

John Kruk Career

  • 3× All-Star (1991–1993), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Kruk is a first baseman and outfielder who played in the major leagues from 1986 to 2003. Kruk was drafted by the Padres in the 2nd round of the 1984 amateur draft.

His MLB debut came on April 7, 1986 against the Atlanta Braves. Kruk had a successful career with San Diego, Seattle, and Chicago Cubs before retiring after playing for Pittsburgh in 2002.

Kruk has been involved with several charity organizations throughout his career and currently serves as ambassador for Special Olympics Florida where he helps raise money for athletes with intellectual disabilities across state lines.

John Kruk is married and has two children Kruk was a three-time All-Star and two time Gold Glove Award winner with the Philadelphia Phillies. Kruk also had success in San Diego, where he won a Silver Slugger Award as an outfielder for the Padres in 1995.

Kruk is most well-known however for his ten seasons playing with the Chicago White Sox from 1995 to 2003, winning World Series titles in both 1998 and 2000. After retiring as a player, Kruk served as hitting coach for the Red Sox (2004–2007) before returning to Chicago's coaching staff in 2008.

John Kruk passed away on July 30th of 2017 at the age of 54 after battling multiple sclerosis since 2002

9. Curt Schilling

Pitcher

Curt Schilling Career

  • 6× All-Star (1997–1999, 2001, 2002, 2004), 3× World Series champion (2001, 2004, 2007), World Series MVP (2001), NLCS MVP (1993), Roberto Clemente Award (2001), 2× MLB wins leader (2001, 2004), 2× NL strikeout leader (1997, 1998), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame, Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

Curt Schilling is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who enjoyed successful stints with the Baltimore Orioles, Boston Red Sox and Arizona Diamondbacks.

Curt Schilling was born in Anchorage, Alaska on November 14th, 1966. Curt's MLB career began in 1988 with the Baltimore Orioles and he went on to play for Boston Red Sox from 2004-2007 before retiring at age 36 due to an ankle injury sustained during his final season with Arizona Diamondbacks.

Curt holds records for most strikeouts (3116) and wins (216) amongst American Leaguers in history as well as fourth place overall finishes among all pitchers since 1900 (.556). His ERA of 3.46 also places him fifth all time behind only Sandy Koufax (#1), Randy Johnson (#2), Walter Johnson (#3) and Bob Gibson (#4).

After his retirement from professional baseball, Curt has started up two businesses: 38 Degrees North LLC which produces outdoor apparel products such as hats, coats & gloves; while The Sports Hub Network broadcasts live sporting events including baseball games online via its website/mobile app combination television service that offers over 50 channels devoted exclusively to sports programming.

10. Larry Bowa

Shortstop

Larry Bowa Career

  • 5× All-Star (1974–1976, 1978, 1979), World Series champion (1980), 2× Gold Glove Award (1972, 1978), NL Manager of the Year (2001), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Larry Bowa was a shortstop and manager in the MLB for over 20 years. He had a successful career with the Philadelphia Phillies, but his best days were with the New York Mets.

His batting average was .260 and he hit 2191 hits in 15 home runs. Larry Bowa is also famous for managing teams to two World Series championships while playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1988 and 1996 respectively.

After finishing his playing career, he became a coach and then managed again before retiring in 2007 at the age of 77 years old Larry Bowa is a three-time Manager of the Year winner and played 16 seasons in Major League Baseball.

He led Philadelphia to back-to-back NL East titles in 2001 and 2002, becoming the first player ever to win Manager of the Year honors with two different teams. In 2004, he was fired by Phillies owner Peter Angelos after compiling a record of just 75–87 (.484).

After resigning from his position as manager of the Dodgers in 2010, Bowa served as an advisor for their minor league system before joining Phillies’ coaching staff prior to the 2014 season.

11. Greg Luzinski

Greg Luzinski Career

  • 4× All-Star (1975–1978), World Series champion (1980), Roberto Clemente Award (1978), NL RBI leader (1975), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Luzinski played in the MLB from 1970-1984, having a successful career as both a left fielder and designated hitter. In 1974, he led all major league hitters with a .373 average in 153 games played.

He also won the Silver Slugger Award that season. After retiring as a player, Luzynski served as hitting coach for the White Sox from 1992-1994 before becoming their bench coach in 1995. Greg is currently an infield instructor for the Phillies organization and was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame in 2005.

Greg Luzinski was a three-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion with the Philadelphia Phillies. He batted .276 with 307 home runs and 1,128 RBI in his career. He also had a reputation as one of the most durable players in baseball history; he played in over 2,500 games during his 18 seasons. After leaving the Phillies following the 1984 season, Luzinski spent time with both the Chicago White Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers before retiring after the 1990 season.

12. Lenny Dykstra

Outfielder

Lenny Dykstra Career

  • 3× All-Star (1990, 1994, 1995), World Series champion (1986), Silver Slugger Award (1993)

Dykstra had a lengthy and successful career in the major leagues, playing for several teams over the course of his 20-year career. He was most notably a member of the New York Mets from 1985 to 2001, where he won three NL MVP Awards and helped lead them to their only World Series championship.

Dykstra's baseball skills were not limited to hitting balls out of stadiums – he also displayed strong throwing abilities, helping him make an impact at both outfield positions throughout his career. Dykstra has been involved in numerous controversies throughout his career, including allegations of domestic violence and drug use; however, he has always maintained that these accusations are false.

In 2003, Dyksta retired from professional baseball after spending time rehabilitating an injury sustained during the previous season's playoffs with the Philadelphia Phillies. After retiring from baseball, Dyknra took up golfing – becoming one of the top players in America through his prowess on this new sport as well .

13. Cole Hamels

Pitcher

Cole Hamels Career

  • 4× All-Star (2007, 2011, 2012, 2016), World Series champion (2008), World Series MVP (2008), NLCS MVP (2008), Pitched an immaculate inning on May 17, 2014, Pitched a combined no-hitter on September 1, 2014, Pitched a no-hitter on July 25, 2015

Cole Hamels is a pitcher who has played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Atlanta Braves over the last decade. He has won 163 games in his career, while losing 122.

Hamels was drafted by the Phillies in the first round of the 2006 MLB Draft and made his debut with them that year. In 2012, he signed with the Texas Rangers as a free agent and enjoyed some great success there before returning to Philly in 2019.

Hamels throws left-handed and bats right-handed but can also play first base if needed; he's spent time at all three outfield positions during his career so far. Cole Hamels is well known for being an intimidating presence on the mound, with a fastball that often tops 100 MPH and dangerous curveball as well.

Although he will likely end his career playing for one team (the Braves are reportedly interested), ColeHamels still possesses plenty of talent and potential to continue dominating Major League Baseball into 2020 or beyond.

14. Robin Roberts

Robin Roberts Career

  • 7× All Star (1950–1956), 4× MLB wins leader (1952–1955), 2× MLB strikeout leader (1953, 1954), Philadelphia Phillies No. 36 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Robin Roberts was a pitcher and catcher who played in the Major Leagues for over 20 years. He is most famous for his work on "The Morning Show" with David Letterman, where he interviewed celebrities and provided entertainment news.

In 2010, Roberts died of complications from pancreatic cancer at the age of 83. Robin Roberts was a pioneer in television broadcasting and helped to change the way people view morning shows. He was loved by many for his sense of humor and welcoming personality on "The Morning Show." Roberts played a key role in the Phillies' success during the late 1950s and early 1960s.

He was an All-Star seven times, led the league twice in strikeouts, and earned a spot on Philadelphia's Wall of Fame. Roberts also had a successful career as an announcer for ESPN before retiring at the end of the 2007 season.

15. Pete Rose

First baseman

Pete Rose Career

  • 17× All-Star (1965, 1967–1971, 1973–1982, 1985), 3× World Series champion (1975, 1976, 1980), NL MVP (1973), World Series MVP (1975), NL Rookie of the Year (1963), 2× Gold Glove Award (1969, 1970), Silver Slugger Award (1981), Roberto Clemente Award (1976), 3× NL batting champion (1968, 1969, 1973), Cincinnati Reds No. 14 retired, Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, , MLB records, , 4,256 career hits, 3,215 career singles, 3,562 career games played, 14,053 career at-bats, 15,890 career plate appearances

Pete Rose is best known for his playing career as an outfielder and infielder with the Cincinnati Reds. He was a three-time all-star, won two MVP Awards, and led the majors in hits four times.

In 1986, Pete Rose was banned from baseball after being found guilty of betting on games he played. After serving his ban, he returned to manage the Reds in 1990 but was fired after only one season.

In 2007, Pete Rose received a Congressional Gold Medal for his contributions to sports and society. Pete Rose currently lives in Florida where he spends his time working as a commentator for professional baseball games and doing charity work He was a great player and one of the most controversial figures in baseball.

He is also known for hitting home runs in consecutive games, which he achieved five times. After being banned from baseball, Rose started managing and led the Reds to three World Series championships. In 1989, he was implicated in an illegal gambling ring and served a jail sentence before returning to manage again later that year.

16. Chuck Klein

Outfielder

Chuck Klein Career

  • 2× All-Star (1933, 1934), NL MVP (1932), Triple Crown (1933), NL batting champion (1933), 4× NL home run leader (1929, 1931–1933), 2× NL RBI leader (1931, 1933), NL stolen base leader (1932), Hit 4 home runs in one game on July 10, 1936, Philadelphia Phillies jersey retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Klein was one of the most promising young players in baseball when he made his debut with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1928. Klein quickly established himself as a top hitter, and by 1934 had become one of the game's elite right fielders.

After hitting .320 batting average with 2,076 hits over nine seasons, Klein retired at the age of 38 to pursue a career in politics. Klein eventually returned to baseball as a coach for several teams before dying from cancer at 53 years old in 1958 Chuck Klein was a slugging first baseman who played for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1936 to 1939.

He is best remembered for his three consecutive seasons as NL batting champion and four home run crowns. Klein was born in West Pittston, Pennsylvania, on October 21, 1907. He started playing baseball at an early age and led his high school team to the state championship in 1925. After spending two years at Drexel University (1927–1929), he signed with the Phillies and made an immediate impact as a rookie in 1928, hitting .291 with 23 home runs and 86 RBIs en route to being named NL MVP runner-up that year.

In 1933, Klein became one of only three players ever to hit 30 or more homers and steal 25 bases in a season; he also finished second behind Carl Hubbell in both voting categories that year (.341 BA/.481 SLG). Over the next three seasons (1936-1939), Klein posted batting averages of .314 or better each time while accumulating 1,201 hits – good enough for fourth all-time among left-handed hitters behind Lou Gehrig (3,191), Hank Aaron (2,297) and Barry Bonds (2,632). Following his final campaign with Philadelphia – during which he batted just .236 but still managed 191 hits over 122 games – Klein retired at the relatively young age of 34 after nine successful major league campaigns overall (.309/1st 3 times)/a career OPS+ of 146.[1]

17. Pat Burrell

Outfielder

Pat Burrell Career

  • 2× World Series champion (2008, 2010), Golden Spikes Award (1998), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Pat Burrell was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in the first round of the 1997 MLB draft. He made his MLB debut with the team in 2000 and played for them until 2011.

During that time, he amassed a total of 3,023 hits, including 968 doubles, 285 home runs and 1,821 RBIs. After leaving Philadelphia, Pat agreed to play for San Francisco Giants from 2012-2014 before retiring at the end of that season due to an injury sustained while playing in a game against Arizona Diamondbacks on September 28th 2014 Pat Burrell was an all-star player for 13 seasons in the MLB.

He had a batting average of .253 and hit 292 home runs. Burrell also tallied 976 RBIs during his career, making him one of the most prolific hitters in Phillies history. After leaving the Phillies, he played for Tampa Bay Rays and San Francisco Giants before retiring in 2011 at age 36. In retirement, Pat has worked as a analyst on Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia broadcasts and is currently coaching baseball at Archbishop Carroll High School in West Chester, PA

18. Bobby Abreu

Bobby Abreu Career

  • 2× All-Star (2004, 2005), Gold Glove Award (2005), Silver Slugger Award (2004), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Abreu is a Venezuelan right fielder who has played in MLB for the Astros and Mets. He is currently playing with the Blue Jays in Canada. Abreu was signed as an amateur free agent by the Astros in 1996 and made his MLB debut that season.

He hit .291 with 2,470 hits over 13 seasons in Houston before being traded to the Mets midway through the 2014 season. In 2005, he won his first Gold Glove Award while with Houston and also led all major league outfielders in assists that year.

Abreu's best years statistically came during his time with New York where he posted career highs batting average (.309) and home runs (50). His performances earned him two AL MVP Awards (2013, 2015). However, after struggling in 2016 picked up by Toronto late into 2017 campaign only to be released at end of season due to injury concerns again he rejoined Blue Jays for 2018 season Bobby Abreu was born March 11th 1974 making him 48 years old this coming December 10th

19. Ed Delahanty

Ed Delahanty Career

  • NL batting champion (1899), 2× NL home run leader (1893, 1896), 3× NL RBI leader (1893, 1896, 1899), NL stolen base leader (1898), Hit 4 home runs in one game on July 13, 1896, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Ed Delahanty was one of the most successful left fielders in baseball history. He had a batting average over .350 and hit more than 2,600 hits during his career.

Delahanty also amassed 101 home runs in his career, which is still an MLB record for left fielders. One of the things that made Delahanty such a great player was his ability to hit for power both at home and on the road.

Delahathy also displayed incredible speed both on the base paths and in the outfield, which helped him make numerous spectacular catches throughout his career. Unfortunately, EdDelahaity died young at just 35 years old after contracting pneumonia while playing winter ball in Canada Ed Delahanty was a talented and highly touted player in his era.

He led the league in batting twice and stolen bases three times during his career. Despite being one of the best hitters of his time, he never won an MVP award or Cy Young Award. After playing for six teams over 12 seasons, Ed retired at the age of 30 due to injury. Today he is largely considered one of the most underrated players in history and is often cited as an example of how hard it is to make it to the Major Leagues from lower levels without having elite skillsets.

20. Tug McGraw

Tug McGraw Career

  • 2× All-Star (1972, 1975), 2× World Series champion (1969, 1980), New York Mets Hall of Fame, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame
  • , , Military career, Allegiance:  United States, Service/branch: U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Years of service: 1965–1971, Rank: Corporal, Unit: Infantry
  • Military career
  • Allegiance:  United States
  • Service/branch: U.S. Marine Corps Reserve
  • Years of service: 1965–1971
  • Rank: Corporal
  • Unit: Infantry

Tug McGraw was a pitcher who played in the Major Leagues for over 20 years. He had an impressive record of 96-92 and 3.14 ERA, while striking out 1,109 batters in 824 games pitched.

Tug became known as "Tugboat" because he often relied on his power pitching to get wins for his teams. However, after 24 seasons in the MLB, Tug retired from playing professionally at the age of 47 due to injury concerns that he had been having for some time.

After retiring from baseball, Tug started coaching with the Mets organization before passing away just two years later at the age of 59 from complications associated with diabetes mellitus type 2 Tug McGraw was a three-time All Star and World Series champion with the Philadelphia Phillies.

Tug served in the U.S Marine Corps Reserve for 3 years, mainly as an assistant baseball coach at his high school alma mater in Florida before becoming a full-time player in 1971. In 1984, he retired from playing baseball to join the military and serve two tours of duty during Operation Desert Shield/Storm as part of the reserves unit until 1990.

During this time he also managed MLB teams Tampa Bay Devil Rays and Oakland Athletics respectively while on leave from active service (he would later manage again after leaving active service). After returning from his second tour of duty in 1990, Tug decided to retire once again from both playing baseball and managing professional teams but continued working for MLB until 2001 when he stepped down due to health problems caused by cancer treatment which ultimately led to his death aged 55 in 2009...

21. Johnny Callison

Johnny Callison Career

  • 4× All-Star (1962, 1962², 1964, 1965), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Johnny Callison was born in Qualls, Oklahoma on March 12, 1939. He attended Abington High School where he starred as a pitcher and outfielder. In 1958, Johnny played for the Chicago White Sox and had an MLB debut against the Washington Senators.

After four seasons with the White Sox, Johnny was traded to the Cleveland Indians in January 1962 for Vada Pinson and Bob Skinner. With Cleveland, Johnny won two World Series titles (1964 & 1970) before being traded to Philadelphia Phillies in November 1971 for Gene Mauch and Elrod Hendrickson .

The next year (1972), Johnny signed with the Oakland Athletics where he spent his final three seasons of his career (1973-1975). In total,Johnny hit .288/.362/.471 with 237 home runs in 1101 games played during his 15-year ML career which ended on October 12th 2006 when he died at 67 years old after a battle with prostate cancer

22. Curt Simmons

Pitcher

Curt Simmons Career

  • 3× All-Star (1952, 1953, 1957), World Series champion (1964), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Curt Simmons was a left-handed pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Phillies and California Angels in his MLB career. Curt Simmons attended Lehigh University and won 19 games as a rookie with the Phillies in 1947.

In 1967, Curt Simmons had one of his best seasons, winning 22 games for the Angels. However, he retired at the end of that year due to arm problems. After retiring from baseball, Curt Simmons worked as an insurance salesman and also served on several boards including those for Temple University and The Boys & Girls Clubs of America where he helped raise money to build new clubs across Pennsylvania.

Curt Simmons passed away on December 13th, 2022 at 93 years old after a long battle with Alzheimers disease He was one of the most successful relief pitchers in baseball history. He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to three World Series championships, including one in 1964. Simmons had a 3.54 ERA and 1,697 strikeouts during his career. Curt Simmons passed away at the age of 83 on October 11th, 2017 after a long illness.

23. Grover Alexander

Grover Alexander Career

  • World Series champion (1926), 3× Triple Crown (1915, 1916, 1920), 6× NL wins leader (1911, 1914–1917, 1920), 4× NL ERA leader (1915, 1916, 1919, 1920), 6× NL strikeout leader (1912, 1914–1917, 1920), Philadelphia Phillies jersey retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame, Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame

Grover Cleveland Alexander was one of the most successful pitchers in baseball history. He won 373 games and lost 208, for a win-loss record of 518-304.

Alexander was born on February 26, 1887 in Elba, Nebraska. Alexander made his MLB debut with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1911 and played until 1930. His best season was 1924 when he went 24-8 with a 2.13 ERA.

Alexander is famous for being able to control both his fastball and slider well, which helped him become one of the most successful pitchers in baseball history. Alexander has been inducted into several Hall of Fame ceremonies including the Baseball Hall of Fame (1936), National Baseball Hall of Fame (1951) and International League Hall of Fame (1964).

Grover Alexander was one of the most dominant pitchers of his time, winning six NL pitching titles and three World Series championships. He retired with a record of 253–138 (.647) over 22 seasons and is seventh all-time in wins. Grover Alexander also had an impressive batting average, hitting .290 or more nine times in his career.

24. Darren Daulton

Darren Daulton Career

  • 3× All-Star (1992, 1993, 1995), World Series champion (1997), Silver Slugger Award (1992), NL RBI leader (1992), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Darren Daulton was a catcher for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1983 to 1989. He then played for the Cleveland Indians from 1990 to 1992, and in 1995 he joined the Chicago White Sox.

In 1996, Daulton became a free agent and signed with the Florida Marlins. After one season with Florida, Daulton retired at the end of 1997 season.. Darren died on August 6th 2017 after a long battle with cancer Darren Daulton was a two-time All-Star and World Series champion with the Philadelphia Phillies.

He batted .245 with 137 home runs and 588 RBI in nine seasons with the team. After playing his final season with Florida, Darren Daulton was inducted into the Phillies Wall of Fame in 2014.

25. Bob Boone

Bob Boone Career

  • 4× All-Star (1976, 1978, 1979, 1983), World Series champion (1980), 7× Gold Glove Award (1978, 1979, 1982, 1986–1989), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Bob Boone was a highly-touted catcher prospect when he signed with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1972. He quickly established himself as one of the best catchers in baseball, winning three Gold Glove Awards and four Silver Slugger Awards during his 11-year career with the Phillies.

In September 1990, Boone was traded to Kansas City where he played until his retirement following the 1991 season. During his 16 seasons playing at least 100 games, Boone had a batting average of over .300 nine times and hit more than 35 home runs twice. The five time All-Star also led both leagues in sacrifice hits on multiple occasions and set several records for catching in franchise history (including most consecutive errorless games).

After retiring from baseball, Bob became a manager with the Cleveland Indians before being fired midway through the 2004 season after posting an 8–20 record (.286) overall

26. Mike Lieberthal

Mike Lieberthal Career

  • 2× All-Star (1999, 2000), Gold Glove Award (1999), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Lieberthal was a catcher for most of his career, but he also played first base and the outfield in smaller stints. He made his MLB debut with the Phillies in 1994 and finished his playing days with the Dodgers in 2007.

Lieberthal was an All-Star twice (1997, 2002) and won a World Series championship with Philadelphia in 2008. After retiring as a player, Lieberthal became an assistant baseball coach at UCLA before being named manager of the Advanced-A Hillsboro Hops in 2013...

Lieberthal was a two-time All-Star and Gold Glove Award winner with the Philadelphia Phillies. Lieberthal spent his entire 14-year career with the Phillies, retiring in 2006. Lieberthal finished his career with a batting average of .274, 150 home runs, and 610 RBIs.

Following his retirement from baseball, Lieberthal became an analyst for MLB Network and Fox Sports 1. In December 2017, he was named as interim manager of the Lehigh Valley IronPigs following the firing of Dave Brundage. He remained in that position until May 2018 when he was replaced by Tino Martinez Jr..

27. Roy Halladay

Pitcher

Roy Halladay Career

  • 8× All-Star (2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2008–2011), 2× Cy Young Award (2003, 2010), 2× MLB wins leader (2003, 2010), Pitched a perfect game on May 29, 2010, Pitched a postseason no-hitter on October 6, 2010, Toronto Blue Jays No. 32 retired, Philadelphia Phillies No. 34 retired, Toronto Blue Jays Level of Excellence, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Roy Halladay was a pitcher for the Toronto Blue Jays from 1998-2013. He had an impressive 203 wins, 105 losses and 3.38 ERA in that time period. On November 7th, 2017, Roy Halladay died after falling off of his boat while fishing near New Port Richey, Florida.

He was 40 years old at the time of his death. A native of Denver, Colorado, Roy Halladay is survived by his wife Brandy and their two children Ryan and Madison. Roy Halladay was one of the best pitchers in history. He won several awards, including two Cy Young Awards and a perfect game.

Roy Halladay is also known for his strong work ethic and determination on the mound.

28. Jim Thome

Designated hitter

Jim Thome Career

  • 5× All-Star (1997–1999, 2004, 2006), Silver Slugger Award (1996), AL Comeback Player of the Year (2006), Roberto Clemente Award (2002), NL home run leader (2003), Cleveland Guardians No. 25 retired, Cleveland Guardians Hall of Fame, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Jim Thome is a three-time All-Star and has had a lengthy MLB career. He was drafted by the Cleveland Indians in 1991 and spent most of his time with them, before being traded to Baltimore in 2012.

In 1998, he became one of only four players in history to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in the same season - an achievement that still stands today. JimThome currently resides outside of Chicago with his family.

Jim Thome is one of the most successful hitters in history. He has five All-Star selections, a Silver Slugger Award and an AL Comeback Player of the Year award to his name. Jim Thome played for Cleveland Indians from 1991 to 2002 before moving on to play for Philadelphia Phillies from 2003 to 2005 and then Chicago White Sox from 2006 to 2009.

In 2010, he joined the Minnesota Twins where he spent two seasons before signing with the Cleveland Indians in 2011. Jim Thome retired as a Phillie in 2012 after playing just 11 games due to injury but continued his involvement with the team by being inducted into their Hall of Fame later that year alongside other greats such as Bob Feller, Lou Gehrig and Joe Jackson.

29. Cliff Lee

Pitcher

Cliff Lee Career

  • 4× All-Star (2008, 2010, 2011, 2013), AL Cy Young Award (2008), AL Comeback Player of the Year (2008), MLB wins leader (2008), AL ERA leader (2008)

Cliff Lee is a highly successful pitcher in the MLB. He has won 143 games in his career and lost 91. Cliff Lee was born on August 30, 1978, in Benton, Arkansas.

Prior to entering the MLB, Lee played for several minor league teams including the Indians and Phillies Organizations. In 2002, Cliff Lee made his MLB debut with the Cleveland Indians and would go on to be one of their most consistent pitchers over the next decade or so.

After winning 143 games during his career, he announced his retirement from professional baseball in 2014 after 11 seasons with Philadelphia Phillies Cliff Lee was a highly successful starting pitcher in the major leagues for 10 seasons. He started with the Cleveland Indians from 2002 to 2009 and won three Cy Young Awards, two ERA titles, and led his team to four straight playoff appearances.

After leaving Cleveland, Lee had mixed success with the Philadelphia Phillies before ending his career with Seattle Mariners in 2010. Cliff Lee finished his career having an earned run average of 3.52 and striking out 1,824 batters over 1382 innings pitched

30. Carlos Ruiz

Catcher

Carlos Ruiz Career

  • All-Star (2012), World Series champion (2008)

Ruiz is a catcher who played for the Philadelphia Phillies from 2006-2013. Ruiz was born in David, Chiriquí, Panama and has been playing baseball since he was young.

Ruiz had an impressive MLB career with the Phillies, posting a .278 batting average and 2,235 hits in 1,091 games. After ending his tenure with the Phillies, Ruiz signed with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and played there until 2016 when he retired after appearing in just one game that year due to injury.

Nowadays Carlos Ruiz spends his time working as a television personality in Latin America and occasionally makes appearances on MLB broadcasts to offer commentary or analysis on play Ruiz is a three-time all-star and two-time world champion with Philadelphia. Ruiz also won an MVP award in 2012, hitting .284 with 71 home runs and 415 RBIs in his career.

Ruiz was traded to the Dodgers midway through the 2016 season, where he helped lead them to their first World Series title in 29 years. After spending 2017 with Seattle, Ruiz signed a one-year deal with the Phillies for 2018 on December 3rd.

31. Jim Bunning

Jim Bunning Career

  • 9× All-Star (1957, 1959, 1961–1964, 1966), AL wins leader (1957), 3× Strikeout leader (1959, 1960, 1967), Pitched a perfect game on June 21, 1964, Pitched a no-hitter on July 20, 1958, Philadelphia Phillies No. 14 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Jim Bunning was born on August 3, 1937 in London, Kentucky. He attended the University of Louisville and earned a law degree from the university's School of Law in 1962.

After earning his degree, Buning worked as an attorney for several years before being elected to the U.S House of Representatives in 1986 where he served until 1999. In 2000, Jim Bunning was elected to represent Kentucky's 4th district in the U.S Senate and served there until 2011 when he retired at age seventy-one after winning reelection by a wide margin against Rand Paul .

Throughout his congressional career ,Bunning was known for his conservative stances on issues such as taxes , healthcare reform , and national security . In 2007, Jim Bunning became one of only two senators to vote against President George W Bush 's effort to extend emergency unemployment benefits

32. Del Ennis

Del Ennis Career

  • 3× All-Star (1946, 1951, 1955), NL RBI leader (1950), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Del Ennis was an outfielder who played in the Majors for over a decade. He batted right and threw right, which made him valuable both on the field and in the lineup.

Del Ennis had a long career but it wasn't all smooth sailing - he hit well enough to stay in the MLB but his durability was often questioned. In total, Ennis played 9 seasons with Philadelphia (1946-1951), Chicago (1952-1959) and Boston (1960).

His best years were spent with Philadelphia, where he won three Gold Gloves as an outfielder from 1946-49. After playing his final season with Boston in 1960, DelEnnis retired from baseball at just 28 years old due to injury coupled with general wear and tear on his body during such a lengthy career.

Today, DelEnnis is most famous for being part of one of baseball's most legendary double plays: With White Sox second baseman Luis Aparicio holding runner Carl Yastrzemski at first base, Red Sox shortstop Bobby Doerrdelivered a throw to third baseman Joe Foy that went into leftfielder Pee Wee Reese's glove; then Reese tagged upYastrzemski who was running towards home plate; finally catcher Johnny Bench delivered the ball back toFoy at firstbase allowingAparicio to be put out byReese thereby completing what has since been called "The Double Play." DelEnnis died of cancer at 70 years old after struggling with health problems for some time beforehand

33. Billy Wagner

Billy Wagner Career

  • 7× All-Star (1999, 2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2010), NL Rolaids Relief Man Award (1999), Pitched a combined no-hitter on June 11, 2003, Houston Astros Hall of Fame

Wagner made his MLB debut for the Houston Astros in 1995. He went on to win 47 games over 4 seasons with the Astros before joining the Braves in 2000. Wagner was a key player for Atlanta during their run to the 2001 World Series championship game, but lost out to eventual champions Arizona Diamondbacks.

In 2010, Wagner signed with the Mets and enjoyed a successful season as they reached the playoffs - only to lose in 5 games to St Louis Cardinals. Wagner is now retired from professional baseball after spending 11 seasons between Atlanta and New York; he currently works as an analyst for Fox Sports Midwest broadcasts of Major League Baseball games..

Wagner was a dominant relief pitcher in the 1990s and early 2000s. He pitched for six different teams over his career, earning seven All-Star selections and winning two NL Rolaids Relief Man Awards. Wagner's no-hitter was one of the most impressive performances in baseball history. He struck out 11 batters without allowing an earned run on June 11, 2003.

Wagner is currently a member of the Houston Astros Hall of Fame, having been inducted in 2017.

34. Randy Wolf

Pitcher

Randy Wolf Career

  • All-Star (2003)

Randy Wolf is a pitcher who has spent his entire career with the Milwaukee Brewers. He made his MLB debut in 1999 and has since played for Philadelphia, Detroit, and now the Chicago Cubs.

Wolf's win-loss record is 133–125, but he was particularly successful in Detroit where he posted a 95–67 record from 2009 to 2013. Injuries curtailed his output somewhat in 2014 and 2015 (he finished 5th in ERA on the Tigers), but he still managed 14 wins over that time frame overall including 3 straight seasons from 2011 to 2013 when no one else did so on their own at all.

Wolf was a standout pitcher in his early career, winning Rookie of the Year honors in 1999 with the Philadelphia Phillies. He had an impressive run with the Dodgers, starting from 2007 to 2009 and going 76-40 with a 3.03 ERA in that time span. Wolf also won three Cy Young Awards (2007, 2008, 2009) during his time there - becoming only the third pitcher ever to win multiple awards while playing for two different teams (joining Roy Halladay and Pedro Martinez).

After spending one season with Milwaukee Brewers, Wolf signed as a free agent with Baltimore Orioles where he went 4-5 over the next two seasons before retiring at age 36 due to injury problems

35. Bryce Harper

Outfielder

Bryce Harper Career

  • 7× All-Star (2012, 2013, 2015–2018, 2022), 2× NL MVP (2015, 2021), NLCS MVP (2022), All-MLB First Team (2021), NL Rookie of the Year (2012), 2× Silver Slugger Award (2015, 2021), 2× NL Hank Aaron Award (2015, 2021), NL home run leader (2015), Golden Spikes Award (2010)

Bryce Harper is one of the top hitters in baseball and has been for a number of years. He was drafted by the Washington Nationals in 2012 and has since played for them, as well as the Philadelphia Phillies.

Harper is known for his exceptional batting skills, which have seen him hit over .280 many times during his career so far. His power also stands out, with him having hit over 400 home runs throughout his career to date.

Harper's style of play can be described as aggressive; he likes to take risks on the field and often puts himself into difficult situations offensively due to this mindset. This can sometimes lead to some controversy, but overall it makes for an exciting game to watch when Harper is playing.

It seems very likely that Bryce Harper will continue playing professional baseball at a high level for many years yet to come - if not indefinitely.

36. Shane Victorino

Outfielder

Shane Victorino Career

  • 2× All-Star (2009, 2011), 2× World Series champion (2008, 2013), 4× Gold Glove Award (2008–2010, 2013)

Shane Victorino is an outfielder for the Boston Red Sox. He was drafted by the San Diego Padres in the 2nd round of the 2000 MLB Draft and made his debut with them in 2003.

In 2007 Shane Victorino played for Team USA at the World Baseball Classic, where he hit .389/.471/.742 with 8 RBIs in 7 games to help lead his team to a gold medal victory over Japan.

After spending 2008 with Triple-A Portland, ShaneVictorino joined Boston on July 31st of that year and proceeded to be one of their most productive players over the next 3 seasons as he averaged 33 home runs per season between 2009-2011 while also stealing 97 bases each campaign (he has stolen more than 100 bases 4 times).

On October 4th 2015 Shane Victorino announced his retirement from professional baseball after 14 years, 1083 games, 336 doubles, 319 triples, 109 homers and 907 RBIs playing for 6 different teams including stints with San Diego (2003), Los Angeles Angels (2006-2015), Philadelphia Phillies (2013), Texas Rangers (2010) Toronto Blue Jays(2009)and Arizona Diamondbacks(2008).

37. Roy Thomas

Roy Thomas Career

Roy Thomas is a former pitcher and current broadcaster for the Houston Astros. He made his MLB debut with the Astros in 1977, and played with them until 1984.

In 1985, he joined the Philadelphia Phillies as their bullpen coach under manager Gene Mauch. From 1986 to 1994, he served as president of Marvel Comics' comics division, which included such titles as "The Amazing Spider-Man", "X-Men" and "Iron Man".

He left Marvel in 1994 to become editor-in-chief of DC's newly created WildStorm imprint, where he remained until 2000 when he was named editorial director at Random House Publishing Group (now Knopf Publishing Group). Since 2001, Roy has been an ESPN commentator for baseball coverage including games on ESPN Radio networks across the country and also work on Baseball Tonight on ESPN Classic TV channel In 2006 Thomas became an analyst for Fox Sports Net's Major League Baseball coverage

38. Sherry Magee

Sherry Magee Career

  • World Series champion (1919), NL batting champion (1910), 4× NL RBI leader (1907, 1910, 1914, 1918), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Sherry Magee was one of the top hitters in baseball during the late 1910s and early 1920s. He played for six different teams over his career, but is best known for his time with the Philadelphia Phillies.

Magee died from a heart attack at age 44 years old. Sherry Magee was one of the most successful hitters in National League history. She ranks second all-time with 2,169 hits and 83 home runs, and fourth with 1,176 RBIs.

Sherry Magee also had a strong record batting against left-handed pitchers – she averaged .291 against them over her career. Sherry Magee played for three teams during her thirteen seasons in the majors: the Philadelphia Phillies (1904–1914), Boston Braves ( 1915–1917), and Cincinnati Reds ( 1917– 1919).

In 1919, Sherry Magee led the NL with 117 hits while playing for the Philadelphia Phillies in their first World Series victory since 1910. After leaving baseball at age 34 due to health concerns related to an illness she contracted during her player days, Mrs Magee continued to be involved in baseball as president of Women’s Professional Baseball Association from 1971 through 1975 and then as honorary chairperson until 1997 when she passed away at age 89 after suffering a stroke several years earlier

39. Dave Bancroft

Dave Bancroft Career

  • 2× World Series champion (1921, 1922)

Dave Bancroft was a shortstop and manager in the Major Leagues for over 30 years. He played his entire career with the Philadelphia Phillies, appearing in 1,026 games between 1915 and 1930.

His batting average was .279, with 32 home runs and 591 RBIs recorded during that time span. After playing his final game with the Giants on May 31st of 1930, he retired as a player but continued to manage throughout the remainder of his career; including stints with the St Louis Browns (1936-37), Washington Senators (1939-41) and Chicago White Sox (1951).

Dave Bancroft passed away at age 81 on October 9th of 1972 after a long illness. Dave Bancroft was a Hall of Fame player and manager. He won two World Series titles as a player, and another as manager. He is remembered for his batting skills and leadership abilities on the field. He died in 2009 at the age of 100 years old.

40. Gavvy Cravath

Gavvy Cravath Career

  • 6× NL home run leader (1913–1915, 1917–1919), 2× NL RBI leader (1913, 1915), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Gavvy Cravath was a right fielder and manager in Major League Baseball who played for the Boston Red Sox and Philadelphia Phillies. He batted .287 with 119 home runs in his career.

Gavvy Cravath, nicknamed "The Go-Between", helped bring about the end of baseball's dead-ball era by negotiating contracts between players and team owners during the 1920s. After retiring from playing ball, Gavvy Cravath served as team manager for both the Cleveland Indians (1932–35) and Detroit Tigers (1940).

He died at age 82 in 1963. Gavvy Cravath was one of the most accomplished players in baseball history. He played for seven different teams during his career and was a six-time NL home run champion and two-time RBI leader. Gavvy also had a great managerial record, winning 91% of his games while managing in the Phillies' 1919–1920 season.

41. Steve Bedrosian

Pitcher

Steve Bedrosian Career

  • All-Star (1987), World Series champion (1991), NL Cy Young Award (1987), NL Rolaids Relief Man Award (1987), NL saves leader (1987)

Steve Bedrosian was a pitcher in the Major Leagues for more than 20 years. He had a win-loss record of 76–79 and an earned run average of 3.38. Steve Bedrosian made his MLB debut with the Atlanta Braves in 1981 and played there until 1995.

Bedrosian's best season came in 1992, when he had a 17–8 record with a 2.83 ERA, earning him First Team All-Star honors along the way. After leaving the Braves, Bedrosian spent time with several other teams before retiring at the end of 1995 after playing one final game for the Cleveland Indians Steve Bedrosian was an all-star relief pitcher in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

He helped lead the Philadelphia Phillies to a World Series victory in 1991, as well as winning a Cy Young Award that year. After being traded to the Atlanta Braves, he helped them win another National League pennant in 1993. In 1995, he was traded again, this time to the Minnesota Twins, where he spent his final two seasons of professional baseball before retiring at age 38 due to injury.

42. Scott Rolen

Scott Rolen Career

  • 7× All-Star (2002–2006, 2010, 2011), World Series champion (2006), NL Rookie of the Year (1997), 8× Gold Glove Award (1998, 2000–2004, 2006, 2010), Silver Slugger Award (2002), St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame

Scott Rolen is a highly respected third baseman in the MLB. He has been with several teams over his career, but is most well known for his time with the Cincinnati Reds.

Scott Rolen was born on April 4th, 1975 in Evansville, Indiana and first played baseball for the local team as a youngster before being discovered by scouts. After making his MLB debut with Philadelphia in 1996, Scott Rolen quickly became one of the best hitters in baseball and cemented himself as one of the game's great third basemen.

His success continued throughout his career and he retired after playing just three seasons with Cincinnati – two of which were world championships – leaving him without any silverware but still considered to be one of the greatest players ever to play at that position. Nowadays, Scott Rolen works as an analyst on various sports programmes and shows around TV stations across America

43. Brad Lidge

Pitcher

Brad Lidge Career

  • 2× All-Star (2005, 2008), World Series champion (2008), NL Rolaids Relief Man Award (2008), Delivery Man of the Year (2008), NL Comeback Player of the Year (2008), Pitched a combined no-hitter on June 11, 2003

Brad Lidge was a very consistent pitcher during his 11-year MLB career. He won 26 of 32 games he pitched in, and never had an ERA over 3.00. Brad Lidge also had some high-profile wins throughout his career, including a no-hitter against the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2006 and a complete game shutout against the New York Yankees in 2009.

However, Brad Lidge's tenure with the Houston Astros was not as successful as his other seasons with other teams - mainly because they were unable to contend for playoff spots. After playing for Washington from 2012 to 2014, Brad Lidge retired at the age of 36 after failing to recover from Tommy John surgery that he underwent earlier that year.

Brad Lidge is a five-time all-star and three-time world series champion. Brad Lidge was drafted by the Houston Astros in 2002 and spent his entire career with them, winning two NL Rolaids Relief Man Awards along the way. After being traded to Philadelphia in 2008, he helped lead them to their first world series victory since 1975. In 2012, Brad Lidge signed with Washington as a free agent and went on to pitch a no-hitter for them against the New York Mets that year as well.

44. Mitch Williams

Mitch Williams Career

  • All-Star (1989)

Williams was a consistent pitcher in the major leagues for over a decade, posting an above-average win-loss record. His best years came with the Texas Rangers, where he made three playoff appearances and won two games.

After leaving Texas, Williams pitched for Kansas City and St. Louis before retiring at the age of 36 due to injury. Williams is now a coach with the Los Angeles Dodgers organization and has helped guide several young pitchers through their careers Mitch Williams was a dominant starting pitcher in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

His career ERA is 3.65, which ranks first among pitchers with at least 1,000 innings pitched from 1986-1993. He won two Cy Young Awards (1989, 1990) and six Gold Glove Awards (1986-1995). In total, he recorded 660 strikeouts and 192 saves over his nine seasons in the majors.

45. Chris Short

Chris Short Career

  • 2× All-Star (1964, 1967), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Chris Short was a pitcher and hitter in the MLB. He made his debut with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1959, and played for them until 1991. Short had a good career, posting an 84-73 record with 1,161 strikeouts over 18 seasons.

Short is best known for his strong pitching performance, but he also hit well enough to be considered one of the better hitters in baseball at the time. Short died from cancer on August 1st, 1991 at age 53 years old after battling it for some time Short was an All-Star and a key player on the 1973 Milwaukee Brewers.

Short had a great career record of 135-132, including two straight seasons with at least 100 strikeouts. Chris Short also won three Gold Gloves as a shortstop and was inducted into the Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame in 2003.

46. Granny Hamner

Granny Hamner Career

  • 3× All-Star (1952–1954), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Granny Hamner was born in Richmond, Virginia on April 26, 1927. She played shortstop and second base for the Philadelphia Phillies throughout her career and made her MLB debut in 1944.

Granny Hamner was a popular player with fans and often led her team in hits and RBIs during her time in the league. Granny Hamner retired from baseball after the 1973 season but continued to play softball until she died at age 66 on September 12, 1993.

Granny Hamner was born in Kansas City, Missouri on August 1, 1922. Granny Hamner became a professional baseball player when she joined the Philadelphia Phillies in 1944. She played for them until 1959 and hit .262 with 104 home runs during her career. After leaving the Phillies, Granny Hamner spent five years playing for the Cleveland Indians before retiring at age 41 due to an injury sustained while batting in a game against the Boston Red Sox.

Granny Hamner is now retired from playing baseball but continues to live in Kansas City where she is actively involved with several charities and organizations related to children and families. In 1998, Granny Hamner received the prestigious Dick Howser Award from Baseball America magazine as the best female player of all time in women's professional baseball history.

47. Aaron Nola

Pitcher

Aaron Nola Career

  • All-Star (2018), All-MLB Second Team (2022), , MLB records, , Most consecutive strikeouts in a game (10, tied with Tom Seaver and Corbin Burnes)

Aaron Nola is a 29-year-old starting pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies. He made his MLB debut in 2015 and has since been one of the most consistent pitchers in the league.

Aaron Nola throws right-handed and bats left-handed. He was drafted by the Phillies in 2013, but spent two seasons at LSU before making his MLB debut with them in 2015. Aaron Nola has had some impressive performances over his career, including an ERA under 3 throughout much of 2017 and 2018 while also finishing top 10 in Cy Young voting both years (he finished 5th both times).

While he may not have won any awards thus far, there's no doubt that Aaron Nola is one of the best starting pitchers currently playing baseball – if not THE best. Aaron Nola is a talented pitcher who has been successful in the MLB. He joined the Philadelphia Phillies in 2015 and has since had a record of 78-62. Aaron Nola's main strength is his ability to strike out opponents, which he has done 1,380 times in his career so far.

On 27 June 2018, he became an All-Star for the first time and helped lead his team to victory against the Los Angeles Dodgers. In 2020, Aaron Nola was named to both the Second Team All-MLB and The Sporting News AL Pitcher of Year Award list after leading all pitchers with 269 strikeouts during the season.

48. Juan Samuel

Juan Samuel Career

  • 3× All-Star (1984, 1987, 1991), Silver Slugger Award (1987), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Juan Samuel was a two-time All-Star and seven-time Gold Glove winner in the MLB. He made his debut with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1983 and played for them until 1998.

Juan Samuel is most famous, however, for playing for the Toronto Blue Jays from 1995 to 1998. Between 1987 and 1990 he won three batting titles while with the Phillies and led the team to their first World Series appearance in 1980 as well as back-to-back pennants (1982 & 1983).

After leaving baseball he managed several teams including the Los Angeles Dodgers (2003) and Milwaukee Brewers (2004), before taking over as manager of the Atlanta Braves in 2007 which he held until 2013 when he was fired after finishing second in voting for National League Manager of The Year Award behind Bruce Bochy of San Francisco Giants .

49. Garry Maddox

Garry Maddox Career

  • World Series champion (1980), 8× Gold Glove Award (1975–1982), Roberto Clemente Award (1986), Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame
  • , , Military career, Allegiance:  United States, Service/branch:  United States Army, Years of service: 1968–1970
  • Military career
  • Allegiance:  United States
  • Service/branch:  United States Army
  • Years of service: 1968–1970

Maddox was a center fielder for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1972-1986. He had a .285 batting average with 117 home runs and 754 RBIs in his career. Maddox was drafted by the San Francisco Giants in the 6th round of the 1970 MLB amateur draft.

Maddox debuted with the Giants on April 25, 1972, and finished his career with them after playing his final game on April 20, 1986. Maddox is best known for hitting a walk-off home run against Tom Seaver to win Game 3 of the 1982 National League Championship Series (NLCS).

This play is often cited as one of the greatest moments in Phillies history. After retiring from baseball, Maddox became an ESPN sportscaster and served as color commentator for Major League Baseball games starting in 2007 until he retired at age 70 in 2016 Maddox was drafted in 1968 and served in the Army for two years.

Maddox made his big league debut with the Phillies in 1975, playing shortstop for them until 1986. Maddox led the National League twice in fielding percentage (1975, 1980). Maddox won a World Series championship with Philadelphia in 1980 and also earned eight Gold Glove Awards during his career. After retiring from baseball, Garry became a television commentator and worked on MLB telecasts until 2003.

In 2004, he was inducted into the Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame along with other notable players like Mike Schmidt and Jimmy Rollins . Maddox currently resides near Tampa Bay Florida where he continues to work as a commentator for sports broadcasts

50. Zack Wheeler

Pitcher

Zack Wheeler Career

  • All-Star (2021), All-MLB Second Team (2021), NL strikeout leader (2021)

Wheeler was born in Smyrna, Georgia on May 30th 1990. He made his MLB debut with the New York Mets in 2013 and has since played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Atlanta Braves.

Wheeler is a left-handed starting pitcher who throws right-handed. He has had some success at the big league level, recording an ERA of 3.92 over 201 appearances (196 starts). Wheeler is currently signed to play with the Phillies until 2024, at which point he will be 33 years old – making him one of older players in baseball at that point.

Wheeler was drafted by the Mets in 2013 and has spent most of his career with them. Wheeler is a three-time All-Star and a two time NL strikeout leader. In 2019, Wheeler signed with the Phillies as a free agent and had an excellent season, winning Rookie of the Year honors.

51. Jayson Werth

Outfielder

Jayson Werth Career

  • All-Star (2009), World Series champion (2008), Washington Nationals Ring of Honor

Jayson Werth is a former MLB outfielder who played for the Toronto Blue Jays and Washington Nationals. He retired in 2017 after 18 seasons in the league.

Werth was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the first round of the 1998 amateur draft, but he never made it to their major league team. Instead, he spent six years with the Blue Jays before being traded to Washington during the 2007 season.

Werth had some good and bad moments during his career as an MLB player, but he's most remembered for his spectacular home runs which helped him win several batting titles and MVP awards over time. After retiring from baseball, Werth started playing minor league ball with teams such as Baltimore Orioles and Texas Rangers before announcing his retirement at age 41 due to chronic back problems on October 1st of 2017

Final Words

. . The Philadelphia Phillies are one of the oldest and most iconic franchises in baseball, so it’s no surprise that some of their best players have been legends for decades.

From Hall-of-Famers like Mike Schmidt to current stars Chase Utley and Jimmy Rollins, these guys have contributed a lot to the team’s success over the years.

Similar Posts:

What Happened To Freddie And Fitzsimmons?

Freddie and Fitzsimmons were a pair of white Tuxedo cats who lived in the fictional town of West Side Story. They were best friends and inseparable, until one day they disappeared.

How Much Did A Baseball Cost In 1962?

It costs $ 0.25 per ball at that time.

Source: oldsportscards

How Much Did A Baseball Cost In 1962

In a baseball cost around $ 0.25 per ball.

Catfish Hunter Hall Of Fame?

The Catfish Hunter Hall of Fame is a prestigious award that honors America’s greatest catfish anglers. It was established in and since then, only a handful of individuals have been bestowed with this honor.

What Did Abbott And Costello Predict?

Abbott and Costello first performed in vaudeville in the early 1920s. They were a popular comedy act that was known for their parodies of current events.

How To See Stats On Gamechanger?

Gamechanger is a mobile app that lets you see stats on your games, including how many people are playing, how much money you’re making, and more. You can also see which of your players are the best at each game mode, and take action to improve their performance.

Where Is The Sweet Spot On An Aluminum Baseball Bat?

An aluminum baseball bat is a great choice for people who are looking to buy an affordable, durable and effective tool. However, there are some important factors that you should take into account before making your purchase.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *