National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum Best Players of All Time

Kevin Smith

Welcome to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York. This iconic institution is a celebration of the great sport of baseball and its place in American culture. Here, you can explore the history, honor the greats, and appreciate the artistry that makes baseball a beloved game.

Through interactive exhibits, displays of artifacts, and engaging programs, the Hall of Fame celebrates the achievements of the sport’s most influential players, managers, and contributors. From Babe Ruth to Jackie Robinson, the museum showcases the best of baseball and its impact on our nation.

Whether you’re a lifelong fan or just discovering the game, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is the perfect place to explore all that baseball has to offer.

Table of Contents

1. David Ortiz

Designated hitter

David Ortiz Career

  • 10× All-Star (2004–2008, 2010–2013, 2016)
  • 3× World Series champion (2004, 2007, 2013)
  • World Series MVP (2013)
  • ALCS MVP (2004)
  • 7× Silver Slugger Award (2004–2007, 2011, 2013, 2016)
  • 2× AL Hank Aaron Award (2005, 2016)
  • Roberto Clemente Award (2011)
  • AL home run leader (2006)
  • 3× AL RBI leader (2005, 2006, 2016)
  • Boston Red Sox No. 34 retired
  • Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

David Ortiz is a five-time All-Star and three-time World Series champion with the Boston Red Sox. He was signed by the Twins as an amateur free agent in 1997 and made his MLB debut that same year.

In 2004, he won his first batting title with a .318 average. Ortiz became one of only four players in history to hit 500 home runs and steal 400 bases (along with Ty Cobb, Rickey Henderson, and José Bautista).

After leading the American League in hits for two consecutive seasons (2008–09), he was named MVP of the 2009 World Series championship team; this earned him Triple Crown recognition from the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBAA).

His 2011 season saw him post career highs in both home runs (49) and RBIs (130), while also setting new single-season records for walks (138) and on-base percentage (.460). 

A finalist for three more MVP Awards during his time with Boston – including wins in 2014 and 2016 – Ortiz finished his career ranked third all-time among major league hitters in total homers (1,886), fourth overall behind. 

Babe Ruth, Jimmie Foxx & Roger Maris respectively, fifth in on-base percentage (.561), sixth in slugging percentage (.690) & seventh place among batters elected to at least 300 games played (#3 behind Lou Gehrig/Babe Ruth/Willy Hodges).

Also Played For: boston red sox

2. Ted Williams

Outfielder

Ted Williams Career

  • 19× All-Star (1940–1942, 1946–1951, 1953–1960²)
  • 2× AL MVP (1946, 1949)
  • 2× Triple Crown (1942, 1947)
  • 6× AL batting champion (1941, 1942, 1947, 1948, 1957, 1958)
  • 4× AL home run leader (1941, 1942, 1947, 1949)
  • 4× AL RBI leader (1939, 1942, 1947, 1949)
  • MLB record .482 career on-base percentage
  • Boston Red Sox No. 9 retired
  • Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame
  • San Diego Padres Hall of Fame
  • Major League Baseball All-Century Team
  • Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Ted Williams was one of the greatest hitters in history and is often considered to be the best left fielder ever. He made his MLB debut with the Boston Red Sox in 1939 and remained with them for most of his career, finishing with a record 2,654 hits.

In 1950 he won both the Most Valuable Player (MVP) and World Series titles while playing for Boston. After leaving Boston in 1960, Williams played for several other teams before retiring at age 39 in 1966 due to an illness that forced him to stop hitting balls out of the park.

Ted Williams is now widely known as a baseball coach, working with young players on various camps around America including those run by Major League Baseball itself. 

He passed away from natural causes at age 83 in 2002 after having spent many years living quietly near Inverness Florida where he enjoyed golfing and fishing among other activities.

Also Played For: sports illustrated baseball

3. Wade Boggs

Third baseman

Wade Boggs Career

  • 12× All-Star (1985–1996)
  • World Series champion (1996)
  • 2× Gold Glove Award (1994, 1995)
  • 8× Silver Slugger Award (1983, 1986–1989, 1991, 1993, 1994)
  • 5× AL batting champion (1983, 1985–1988)
  • Boston Red Sox No. 26 retired
  • Tampa Bay Rays No. 12 retired
  • Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

Wade Boggs was a three-time All-Star and won two Gold Gloves in his career. He spent almost all of his 13 seasons with the Boston Red Sox, where he finished as the franchise leader in home runs (118) and RBIs (1,014).

After leaving Boston for Tampa Bay in 1999, Boggs hit just .259 over the next four years before retiring at age 36 in 2003. Wade is now an ESPN analyst and occasional player-coach on their Baseball Tonight show. In 2013, he was elected to the Hall of Fame by a vote of fellow MLB players.

Wade Boggs was a well-known and highly respected player in the MLB for many years. He played on some of the most successful teams of all time, including the Boston Red Sox and Tampa Bay Devil Rays. 

Even though he retired several years ago, Wade Boggs remains an important part of both baseball history and lore.

He is a Hall of Fame inductee and has been awarded numerous accolades throughout his career, including two Gold Glove Awards as well as MVP votes multiple times. 

Wade Boggs never seemed to stop hitting during his lengthy professional career; even at age 40, he hit over 300 for one season with the Devil Rays. 

His dedication to the sport showed through in every game he played, no matter who or what was against him.

In 2005 Wade Boggs became only the fourth player in MLB history to be elected into both the National Baseball Hall of Fame and its Veterans Committee simultaneously (joining Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, and Cy Young). 

This testament not only proves just how great an individual Wade Boggs was but also highlights his longstanding influence on American baseball culture overall.

4. Carl Yastrzemski

Left fielder

Carl Yastrzemski Career

  • 18× All-Star (1963, 1965–1979, 1982, 1983)
  • AL MVP (1967)
  • Triple Crown (1967)
  • 7× Gold Glove Award (1963, 1965, 1967–1969, 1971, 1977)
  • 3× AL batting champion (1963, 1967, 1968)
  • AL home run leader (1967)
  • AL RBI leader (1967)
  • Boston Red Sox No. 8 retired
  • Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

Carl Yastrzemski is 83 years old and was one of the best left-fielders in baseball history. He hit 3,419 hits and drove in 1,844 runs over his career. 

Carl Yastrzemski played for the Boston Red Sox from 1961 to 1983 and was a member of two World Series-winning teams (1972 and 1975).

In 1976, he was named MVP of the American League after hitting .285 with 43 home runs and 152 RBIs. After retirement from playing professional baseball, Carl Yastrzemski became a broadcaster for NESN in Boston until his death in 2013 at the age of 75. 

Carl Yastrzemski was a three-time AL batting champion and seven-time Gold Glove Award winner with the Boston Red Sox.

He is one of only five players in history to be named MVP, Triple Crown Winner, and Home Run Leader in the same season. In 1967 he became the first player ever to hit 40 home runs and drive in 100 RBIs in a single season. 

After his playing career ended, Yastrzemski served as Senior Vice President for Baseball Operations for the New York Yankees from 1996 to 2002 before retiring completely later that year.

5. Pedro Martínez

Pitcher

Pedro Martínez Career

  • 8× All-Star (1996–2000, 2002, 2005, 2006)
  • World Series champion (2004)
  • 3× Cy Young Award (1997, 1999, 2000)
  • Triple Crown (1999)
  • MLB wins leader (1999)
  • 5× MLB ERA leader (1997, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003)
  • 3× AL strikeout leader (1999, 2000, 2002)
  • Boston Red Sox No. 45 retired
  • Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame

Pedro Martínez is a pitcher who has spent his entire career with the Philadelphia Phillies. He was drafted by them in 1992 and made his MLB debut that year.

Pedro Martínez has been one of the most successful pitchers in Phillies history, winning 219 games while posting an ERA of 2.93 and striking out 3,154 batters over the course of his career.

Pedro Martínez may be nearing the end of his playing days, but he still holds many records and accolades within baseball including being named to three All-Star teams as well as winning two Cy Young Awards (the highest honor for a pitcher in MLB).

After spending 11 seasons with Philadelphia, Martínez signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers prior to the 2009 season where he posted a record of 5–10 before retiring at the end of that season. 

Now 51 years old, Pedro Martínez continues to work as a broadcaster for Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia covering both Phillies games and other sporting events around the Delaware County area during select weeks throughout each baseball season.

Also Played For: mlb, mlb under 25

6. Frank Thomas

Infielder

Frank Thomas Career

  • 5× All-Star (1993–1997), 2× AL MVP (1993, 1994), 4× Silver Slugger Award (1991, 1993, 1994, 2000), AL batting champion (1997), Chicago White Sox No. 35 retired

Frank Thomas spent his entire 18-year MLB career with the Chicago White Sox, amassing 521 home runs and 2,468 hits. He was a three-time American League MVP (1995, 1998, 2003) and won an AL Championship in 2005 as part of the White Sox team that came within one game of reaching the World Series.

In 2008 he was traded to Oakland and played his last season before retiring at the end of it. Frank Thomas is currently a broadcaster for Fox Sports Midwest covering baseball games in that region. 

He has also been involved in several business ventures outside of baseball including owning a restaurant chain called "The Keg" which closed down after only two years in operation due to financial difficulties Frank Thomas is a five-time all-star and two time MVP.

He won the batting championship in 1997 with a .342 average. Thomas was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2014 after being voted in on his first ballot by 83.7%. Frank Thomas spent most of his career with the Chicago White Sox, where he was named an All Star for six seasons and became their franchise leader in home runs (630).

 After playing just one season for Oakland, he signed with Toronto as a free agent and ended up winning two more Silver Slugger Awards before retiring at age 41 due to injury

Also Played For: chicago white sox

7. Brooks Robinson

Third baseman

Brooks Robinson Career

  • 18× All-Star (1960–1974), 2× World Series champion (1966, 1970), AL MVP (1964), World Series MVP (1970), 16× Gold Glove Award (1960–1975), Roberto Clemente Award (1972), AL RBI leader (1964), Baltimore Orioles No. 5 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Robinson was a three-time batting champion and an all-star for 17 seasons, accumulating 2,848 hits in the process. Robinson played his entire career with the Baltimore Orioles and is one of only five players to have 3,000 hits and 500 home runs.

He led the American League in strikeouts four times and finished fourth on several other occasions. After retiring as a player, Brooks Robinson served as a manager for two teams before returning to playing at age 50 in 1977 – he held the record for oldest player to play until it was broken by Jim Edmonds six years later.

A diabetic since 1978, Brooks Robinson announced his retirement from baseball following the 1997 season due to complications from diabetes mellitus Brooks Robinson was one of the greatest hitters in baseball history. 

He played 18 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles and won two World Series titles. 2. Brooks Robinson is a member of the Hall of Fame and has been awarded many awards, including 16 Gold Gloves, MVP and Roberto Clemente Award.

3. Brooks Robinson's legacy will live on through his induction into Major League Baseball's All-Century Team as well as his contributions to both the game and Hall of Fame inductions.

Also Played For: baltimore orioles

8. Cal Ripken Jr.

Third baseman

Cal Ripken Jr. Career

  • 19× All-Star (1983–2001), World Series champion (1983), 2× AL MVP (1983, 1991), AL Rookie of the Year (1982), 2× Gold Glove Award (1991, 1992), 8× Silver Slugger Award (1983–1986, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994), Roberto Clemente Award (1992), MLB record 2,632 consecutive games played, Baltimore Orioles No. 8 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Cal Ripken Jr. is a Hall of Famer who played shortstop and third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles over 20 seasons. 

He was one of baseball's most consistent players, never finishing lower than 4th in MVP voting or leading his league in strikeouts once.

His 3184 hits are fifth all-time and his 430 home runs rank 7th on the list. Ripken also had 1,695 RBIs which makes him one of just nine players with 2,000+ career RBIs and 100 HRs (he hit #3).

 He holds many records including consecutive games played (2,632), chances faced (12,721), at bats (5463) and singles (1,876).

Ripken has been voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame twice—in 1995 as a Third Baseman and again in 2013 as a shortstop/third baseman despite concerns about steroid use during his playing days that were not fully resolved until later in life by Biogenesis researchers he hired to investigate these claims specifically targeted at him.

Despite being sidelined by neck problems from 2001-2004 he still ranks 8th on MLB's all-time lists with 24 Gold Gloves awards as well as 5 Platinum Glove Awards given to the best fielding player at each position regardless of whether they lead their league in that category or not.

This distinction is usually only given to catchers because they handle more difficult balls than any other infielder & outfielders combined.

At 62 years old Ripken retired after playing his final game against the New York Yankees - becoming just the 6th player ever to play 3000+ innings & 500+ games while averaging over 200 hits per season (.276 BA / .431 HR avg.).

9. Eddie Murray

Eddie Murray Career

  • 8× All-Star (1978, 1981–1986, 1991), World Series champion (1983), AL Rookie of the Year (1977), 3× Gold Glove Award (1982–1984), 3× Silver Slugger Award (1983, 1984, 1990), AL home run leader (1981), AL RBI leader (1981), Baltimore Orioles No. 33 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Murray was a five-time All Star and three-time Gold Glover. He spent the majority of his career with the Baltimore Orioles, but also played for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Seattle Mariners.

Murray is best known for his power hitting, as he hit 3255 home runs in his career. Murray is one of only six players to have 400+ hits, 30+ home runs, 100+ RBIs and 50+ doubles in a season (he did it four times).

In 1997, Murray had an excellent year batting .287 with 53 home runs and 117 RBIs – finishing second in MVP voting behind Ken Griffey Jr.. A two-time World Series champion and eight-time All-Star, Murray was one of the most dominant hitters in baseball history.

He led the Orioles to their only championship in 1983 and also won three Silver Slugger Awards and a Gold Glove Award during his career. Known for his powerful bat and superb on-base skills, Murray ranks fifth all time in home runs with 592 long balls.

10. Mike Mussina

Pitcher

Mike Mussina Career

  • 5× All-Star (1992–1994, 1997, 1999), 7× Gold Glove Award (1996–1999, 2001, 2003, 2008), MLB wins leader (1995), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Mike Mussina was a dominant pitcher in his day, and he won 270 games over the course of his career. He made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 1991, and stayed there for six seasons before moving on to the Yankees.

While with New York, he helped lead them to three World Series titles (1996-1998) as well as four American League pennants (1995-1997, 1999). 

In 2008, after playing just one season for the Washington Nationals, Mike retired at age 39 due to an injury sustained during spring training.

Since retiring from baseball, Mike has focused on broadcasting and coaching; he currently works as a color commentator for MASN televison broadcasts of the Baltimore Orioles games. Mussina was a three-time All Star and won seven Gold Glove Awards, making him one of the most decorated pitchers in Orioles history.

Mussina led the majors in wins twice (1995 and 2001) and finished third once (1996). He also holds records for most strikeouts in a season with 2,813 (1999), as well as consecutive complete games without an ERA over 5 innings pitched streak of 7 starts (2002–2004). 

After spending 13 seasons with Baltimore, Mussina signed with the Yankees in 2008 where he spent six more seasons before retiring at age 41.

Also Played For: new york yankees

11. Rod Carew

Rod Carew Career

  • 18× All-Star (1967–1984), AL MVP (1977), AL Rookie of the Year (1967), Roberto Clemente Award (1977), 7× AL batting champion (1969, 1972–1975, 1977, 1978), Minnesota Twins No. 29 retired, Los Angeles Angels No. 29 retired, Minnesota Twins Hall of Fame, Angels Hall of Fame

Rod Carew had a lengthy MLB career, playing for the Twins from 1967 to 1985. He was known as one of the best first basemen and second basemen in baseball history.

RodCarew finished with an impressive batting average of .328 and hit 3,053 home runs in his career. RodCarew also excelled at running the bases - 

he scored 1,015 runs during his 16-year career which is still a record for a second baseman (shared now by Carlos Baerga and Dustin Pedroia).

After finishing his MLB career, Rod Carew went on to have a successful managerial career with several teams including the Angels, Twins, and White Sox before retiring in 1998. 

Rod Carew was a 12-time all-star and three-time MVP. He led the AL in batting average four times and home runs twice. In 1979, he became the first player to hit 50 home runs and steal 100 bases in one season. He is also a member of the Twins Hall of Fame as well as the California Angels Hall of Fame.

Also Played For: los angeles angels, minnesota twins

12. Mike Schmidt

Infielder

Mike Schmidt Career

  • 12× All-Star (1974, 1976, 1977, 1979–1984, 1986, 1987, 1989), World Series champion (1980), 3× NL MVP (1980, 1981, 1986), World Series MVP (1980), 10× Gold Glove Award (1976–1984, 1986), 6× Silver Slugger Award (1980–1984, 1986), 8× NL home run leader (1974–1976, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1986), 4× NL RBI leader (1980, 1981, 1984, 1986), Hit 4 home runs in one game on April 17, 1976, Philadelphia Phillies No. 20 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Schmidt was an All-Star third baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1972 to 1989. Schmidt led the National League in hits twice, and home runs three times during his career.

Schmidt is one of only five players in MLB history with 2,000 hits and 500 homers. Schmidt won two Gold Glove Awards as a third baseman, in 1976 and 1981. Schmidt was one of the most dominant hitters in MLB history, winning 12 All-Star games and three MVP awards.

Schmidt was also a five-time Gold Glove winner and six-time Silver Slugger recipient. He is also the all-time leader in home runs for Philadelphia Phillies, with 228 career dingers. Schmidt's 4 HRs on April 17, 1976 are still a Phillies record.

Also Played For: philadelphia phillies

13. Steve Carlton

Pitcher

Steve Carlton Career

  • 10× All-Star (1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1977, 1979–1982), 2× World Series champion (1967, 1980), 4× NL Cy Young Award (1972, 1977, 1980, 1982), Triple Crown (1972), Gold Glove Award (1981), 4× NL wins leader (1972, 1977, 1980, 1982), NL ERA leader (1972), 5× NL strikeout leader (1972, 1974, 1980, 1982, 1983), Philadelphia Phillies No. 32 retired, Philadelphia Phillies Wall of Fame

Carlton was one of the most successful pitchers in baseball history, winning more games than any other pitcher. He is best known for his dominant performances with the St.

Louis Cardinals from 1965 to 1988, helping them win three National League (NL) championships and two World Series titles during that time period. Carlton also played briefly for the Minnesota Twins after leaving St.

Louis and had a respectable career overall, finishing with an NL record 329 wins and 244 losses over 12 seasons. Carlton has been retired since 1988 but remains popular among baseball fans as an ambassador for the sport and advocate for player safety initiatives throughout his career.

In 2010, he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, becoming only the third pitcher ever to be enshrined in that prestigious institution following Dizzy Dean and Cy Young.

Also Played For: st. louis cardinals

14. Pete Rose

First baseman

Pete Rose Career

  • 17× All-Star (1965, 1967–1971, 1973–1982, 1985), 3× World Series champion (1975, 1976, 1980), NL MVP (1973), World Series MVP (1975), NL Rookie of the Year (1963), 2× Gold Glove Award (1969, 1970), Silver Slugger Award (1981), Roberto Clemente Award (1976), 3× NL batting champion (1968, 1969, 1973), Cincinnati Reds No. 14 retired, Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, , MLB records, , 4,256 career hits, 3,215 career singles, 3,562 career games played, 14,053 career at-bats, 15,890 career plate appearances

Pete Rose is best known for his playing career as an outfielder and infielder with the Cincinnati Reds. He was a three-time all-star, won two MVP Awards, and led the majors in hits four times.

In 1986, Pete Rose was banned from baseball after being found guilty of betting on games he played. After serving his ban, he returned to manage the Reds in 1990 but was fired after only one season.

In 2007, Pete Rose received a Congressional Gold Medal for his contributions to sports and society. Pete Rose currently lives in Florida where he spends his time working as a commentator for professional baseball games and doing charity work He was a great player and one of the most controversial figures in baseball.

He is also known for hitting home runs in consecutive games, which he achieved five times. After being banned from baseball, Rose started managing and led the Reds to three World Series championships. 

In 1989, he was implicated in an illegal gambling ring and served a jail sentence before returning to manage again later that year.

15. Scott Rolen

Scott Rolen Career

  • 7× All-Star (2002–2006, 2010, 2011), World Series champion (2006), NL Rookie of the Year (1997), 8× Gold Glove Award (1998, 2000–2004, 2006, 2010), Silver Slugger Award (2002), St. Louis Cardinals Hall of Fame

Scott Rolen is a highly respected third baseman in the MLB. He has been with several teams over his career, but is most well known for his time with the Cincinnati Reds.

Scott Rolen was born on April 4th, 1975 in Evansville, Indiana and first played baseball for the local team as a youngster before being discovered by scouts. 

After making his MLB debut with Philadelphia in 1996, Scott Rolen quickly became one of the best hitters in baseball and cemented himself as one of the game's great third basemen.

His success continued throughout his career and he retired after playing just three seasons with Cincinnati – two of which were world championships – leaving him without any silverware but still considered to be one of the greatest players ever to play at that position. 

Nowadays, Scott Rolen works as an analyst on various sports programmes and shows around TV stations across America.

16. Lee Smith

Lee Smith Career

  • 7× All-Star (1983, 1987, 1991–1995), 3× Rolaids Relief Man Award (1991, 1992, 1994), 4× saves leader (1983, 1991, 1992, 1994), Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame

Lee Smith was a relief pitcher in the MLB for over a decade. He had a respectable win-loss record, but his ERA was high. Lee Smith is most noted for helping lead the Chicago Cubs to their first World Series title in 1985.

After leaving the MLB, he continued to play baseball in Japan and other countries before retiring at age 65 in 1997. Lee Smith is a former pitcher who played for the Chicago Cubs, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals and New York Yankees from 1980-1993.

He was an All-Star seven times and led the league in saves four times during his career. Lee Smith also won three relief man awards during his time in baseball and is now a member of the Hall of Fame.

Also Played For: st louis cardinals, chicago cubs

17. Robin Yount

Outfielder

Robin Yount Career

  • 3× All-Star (1980, 1982, 1983), 2× AL MVP (1982, 1989), Gold Glove Award (1982), 3× Silver Slugger Award (1980, 1982, 1989), Milwaukee Brewers No. 19 retired, American Family Field Walk of Fame, Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor

Robin Yount was a shortstop and center fielder who played for the Milwaukee Brewers from 1974 to 1993. He had an impressive batting average of .285 and hit 3,142 home runs in his MLB career.

Yount won two Gold Glove Awards and five Silver Slugger Awards during his time with the Brewers. In 2006, he became manager of the Class A Beloit Snappers in the independent American Association (AA).

On October 6, 2016, at age 67 years old, Robin Yount announced his retirement as manager of Beloit Snappers after fourteen seasons in charge. Robin Yount was a 3-time all-star and 2 time MVP for the Milwaukee Brewers.

He is in both the National Baseball Hall of Fame and the American Family Field Walk of Fame. Robin played his entire career with the Brewers, retiring in 1993 after 19 seasons.

Also Played For: milwaukee brewers

18. Hank Aaron

Hank Aaron Career

  • 25× All-Star (1955–1975), World Series champion (1957), NL MVP (1957), 3× Gold Glove Award (1958–1960), 2× NL batting champion (1956, 1959), 4× NL home run leader (1957, 1963, 1966, 1967), 4× NL RBI leader (1957, 1960, 1963, 1966), Atlanta Braves No. 44 retired, Milwaukee Brewers No. 44 retired, Braves Hall of Fame, American Family Field Walk of Fame, Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, , MLB records, , 2,297 career runs batted in, 6,856 career total bases, 1,477 career extra-base hits

Hank Aaron was one of the most outstanding baseball players in history and is widely considered to be one of the greatest hitters in MLB history. He retired with a .305 batting average, 3,771 hits, and 382 home runs.

Aaron played his entire career for the Milwaukee Braves (1954-1976). In 1974 he led the Braves to their first World Series championship since 1957 and became only the third player ever to win three MVP Awards (the other two being Willie Mays and Babe Ruth).

After retiring from baseball, Aaron served as a television sportscaster for several networks before passing away at age 86 on January 22nd, 2021. Hank Aaron is one of the most iconic and successful baseball players in history. 

He was a five-time all-star, won three World Series titles with the Atlanta Braves, and holds numerous records.

Hank Aaron was born on February 5th, 1935 in Mobile, Alabama. He made his major league debut with the Milwaukee Braves in 1954 at the age of 20 and went on to be one of baseball's greatest hitters during his 14 year career. 

Some of Aaron's most impressive records include being the all-time home run leader (755), batting champion (1957 & 1959), RBI leader (1960 & 1963), as well as having 3 gold gloves award for defensive excellence over that time period.

On September 7th 1974 he passed Babe Ruth for first place on MLB's all-time hits list - a record that still stands today. Hank Aaron has been inducted into both the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975.

Well as both the Atlanta Braves Hall Of Fame and American Family Field Walk Of Fame - making him an extremely celebrated figure within America's favorite pastime.

Also Played For: atlanta braves, boston braves

19. Johnny Bench

Catcher

Johnny Bench Career

  • 14× All-Star (1968–1980, 1983), 2× World Series champion (1975, 1976), 2× NL MVP (1970, 1972), World Series MVP (1976), NL Rookie of the Year (1968), 10× Gold Glove Award (1968–1977), 2× NL home run leader (1970, 1972), 3× NL RBI leader (1970, 1972, 1974), Cincinnati Reds No. 5 retired, Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Johnny Bench is one of the most accomplished catchers in MLB history, and his achievements on the field speak for themselves. He played in over 2,000 games and had an impressive batting average (.267), home run total (389) and RBI totals (1,376).

Johnny Bench was born on December 7, 1947 in Oklahoma City. Shortly after he was born his family moved to Texas where he started playing baseball at a very young age. After spending four seasons with the Cincinnati Reds organization, Bench reached stardom when he made his MLB debut with the team in 1967.

He quickly became one of their best players and helped lead them to back-to-back World Series championships in 1975 and 1976. In 1983, aged 34 years old, Johnny Bench announced.

His retirement from professional baseball following 13 seasons spent with nine different teams throughout both leagues - including two stints with the Cincinnati Reds once again.

Since retiring from professional baseball, bench has remained active by working as a broadcaster for Fox Sports Ohio alongside analyst Tim McCarver. The duo currently call Cleveland Indians games during broadcasts late nights/early mornings EST / PDT. 

JohnnyBench will forever be remembered as an outstanding catcher who led his teams to some incredible successes on the field - whether it was during his time with Cincinnati or later down through Dallas, Pittsburgh, San Diego, St Louis, Philadelphia and Arizona.

His passion for this sport showed through every game that he played which is why he remains such an iconic figure within American League Baseball history.

Also Played For: cincinnati reds

20. Joe Morgan

Infielder

Joe Morgan Career

  • 10× All-Star (1966, 1970, 1972–1979), 2× World Series champion (1975, 1976), 2× NL MVP (1975, 1976), 5× Gold Glove Award (1973–1977), Silver Slugger Award (1982), Cincinnati Reds No. 8 retired, Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, Houston Astros Hall of Fame

Joe Morgan was one of the best second basemen in baseball history. He won five Gold Gloves, and finished with a .271 batting average over his 16-year career.

Joe Morgan made his MLB debut with the Houston Colt 45s in 1963, and spent most of his career with the Cincinnati Reds (1964-1984). In 1984, Morgan led off an inning against Oakland A's pitcher Rick Langford with a home run to win the game 7-6 in 14 innings.

It remains Cincinnati's only victory in an ALDS matchup against their divisional rivals since 1970. After retiring from baseball, Morgan began working as a color commentator for Fox Sports Midwest and served as radio analyst for Major League Baseball on TBS from 2006 to 2010.

On October 11th 2020, at 77 years old, Joe Morgan passed away after suffering a heart attack while playing golf near Danville California.

21. Ken Griffey Jr.

Ken Griffey Jr. Career

  • 13× All-Star (1990–2000, 2004, 2007), AL MVP (1997), 10× Gold Glove Award (1990–1999), 7× Silver Slugger Award (1991, 1993, 1994, 1996–1999), NL Comeback Player of the Year (2005), 4× AL home run leader (1994, 1997–1999), AL RBI leader (1997), Seattle Mariners No. 24 retired, Seattle Mariners Hall of Fame, Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Ken Griffey Jr. is a three-time MVP and one of the most accomplished players in MLB history. He was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in 1989 and spent his entire career with them, becoming a fan favorite along the way.

His 630 home runs are second all time behind only Barry Bonds and he won multiple batting titles as well. After spending several years out of baseball due to injuries, Ken Griffey Jr.'s final season was marked by retirement ceremonies and an induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2010.

Ken Griffey Jr. is one of the most successful baseball players of all time, with 13 All-Star appearances and 10 Gold Glove Awards to his name. 

Ken Griffey Jr.'s standout MLB career was marked by incredible home run totals (4 in total) and unmatched RBI prowess (735). After a tumultuous stint with the Cincinnati Reds, Ken Griffey Jr.

rejoined Seattle Mariners where he still holds many records today – including leading the league in home runs four times. A two-time MVP winner, Ken Griffey Jr.'s accomplishments on and off the field are unrivaled and will be remembered for years to come.

Also Played For: seattle mariners

22. Fred McGriff

Fred McGriff Career

  • 5× All-Star (1992, 1994–1996, 2000), World Series champion (1995), 3× Silver Slugger Award (1989, 1992, 1993), 2× Home run leader (1989, 1992)

McGriff is a first baseman who played in the Major Leagues for 17 seasons, most notably with the Toronto Blue Jays and Tampa Bay Devil Rays. He was known as an excellent power hitter and led the league in home runs twice.

McGriff announced his retirement from baseball after playing his last game for the Devil Rays on July 15, 2004. Since then he has worked as a broadcaster for Fox Sports Florida.

Fred McGriff was born on October 31, 1963, in Tampa, Florida to parents of Jamaican descent.

As a child he loved playing ball and showed great potential at both football and baseball; however, it wasn't until he attended Hillsborough Community College that he started to make waves within collegiate athletics circles. 

After two years at HCC (where he helped lead them to back-to-back NJCAA World Series championships), McGriff transferred to Miami Dade College where he continued to amass impressive stats (.413 batting average with 49 homers over three seasons).

In 1986 McGriff made his MLB debut with the Toronto Blue Jays – hitting .284 with 2,490 hits and 49 home runs over 17 seasons before retiring following the 2004 season. At age 41 due to recurring neck issues stemming from several concussions sustained while playing professional ball.

While never achieving superstar status or being particularly well-liked by fans or teammates alike – largely because of his surly attitude towards reporters (or anyone else). 

Fred McGriff nevertheless remains one of best hitters in MLB history has posted an incredible .284 batting average along with 500+ RBIs & 50 HRs across all competitions.

Also Played For: tampa bay rays, san diego padres

23. Reggie Jackson

Outfielder

Reggie Jackson Career

  • 14× All-Star (1969, 1971–1975, 1977–1984), 5× World Series champion (1972–1974, 1977, 1978), AL MVP (1973), 2× World Series MVP (1973, 1977), 2× Silver Slugger Award (1980, 1982), 4× AL home run leader (1973, 1975, 1980, 1982), AL RBI leader (1973), Oakland Athletics No. 9 retired, New York Yankees No. 44 retired, Athletics Hall of Fame, Monument Park honoree

Reggie Jackson was a dominant right fielder for the New York Yankees in the late 1970's and early 1980's. He helped lead the team to three World Series titles, batting over .300 each season and hitting over 100 home runs twice.

Jackson struggled with alcoholism during his career and had several run-ins with law enforcement, including one incident in which he shot at an intruder who had broken into his home. 

After retiring from baseball, Jackson began working as a broadcaster for both television and radio stations around the country.

He has since passed away at age 76 after battling cancer Reggie Jackson was a 5x World Series champion and MVP with the Oakland Athletics. He is one of only four players in history to have won three MVP awards, as well as two Silver Slugger Awards for best offensive player at his position. 

His 14 All-Star selections are second all time behind only Joe DiMaggio's 16 honors.Reggie hit over 500 home runs during his career, establishing himself as one of the most feared hitters in baseball history.

Also Played For: oakland athletics, california angels best player

24. Dennis Eckersley

Pitcher

Dennis Eckersley Career

  • 6× All-Star (1977, 1982, 1988, 1990–1992), World Series champion (1989), AL MVP (1992), AL Cy Young Award (1992), ALCS MVP (1988), 2× AL Rolaids Relief Man Award (1988, 1992), 2× MLB saves leader (1988, 1992), Pitched a no-hitter on May 30, 1977, Oakland Athletics No. 43 retired, Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, Athletics Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Dennis Eckersley is a retired MLB pitcher who spent his entire 20-year career with the Boston Red Sox. Eckersley was an all-star for seven seasons and helped lead Boston to their first World Series title in 86 years in 1997.

Eckersley had some of the best control in baseball, striking out 2,401 batters during his career - second only to Randy Johnson's record of 2,956 strikeouts. He also led the league in saves three times and finished as runner up twice more.

Eckersley battled injuries throughout most of his career but still managed to pitch 219 complete games, which is second all time behind Nolan Ryan's 248 complete games played (both achieved while playing for different teams). 

On September 26th 1998, Dennis Eckersley announced his retirement from professional baseball after 17 years and 3rd place finish at the American League Championship Series against Texas.

 Rangers outfielder Jeff Bagwell and 5 other players including current Detroit Tigers starting pitcher Justin Verlander who made their debut that year throwing one inning for Houston Astros (Eck had previously beaten Verlander 8-1 on May 1st pitching 10 innings).

Currently resides near San Francisco Bay Area where he owns two restaurants "The Bistro" & "Dennis' Hideaway", both located inside The Fairmont Hotel Napa Valley Dennis has been outspoken about various political issues over recent years such as gun reform following Parkland school shooting.

25. George Brett

Infielder

George Brett Career

  • 13× All-Star (1976–1988), World Series champion (1985), AL MVP (1980), ALCS MVP (1985), Gold Glove Award (1985), 3× Silver Slugger Award (1980, 1985, 1988), 3× AL batting champion (1976, 1980, 1990), Kansas City Royals No. 5 retired, Kansas City Royals Hall of Fame

George Brett is a third baseman and designated hitter who played for the Kansas City Royals from 1973 to 1993. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2005.

George Brett had an incredible career, hitting over .300 with 3154 hits, 317 home runs and 1,596 RBIs. In 1987 he led the American League in batting average and won his first MVP award.

He also played for teams such as Toronto Blue Jays, Oakland Athletics and Boston Red Sox before retiring after the 1993 season。 George Brett was one of the greatest hitters in baseball history, and he helped lead the Kansas City Royals to three World Series titles.

He won AL MVP awards in 1980 and 1985, as well as a Gold Glove Award in 1985. Brett also hit over 300 home runs during his career, which is an MLB record for most homers by a position player. 

George Brett retired from playing baseball after the 1993 season, which marked the end of an incredible 17-year career that included 13 All-Star appearances and 3 batting championships.

Also Played For: kansas city royals

26. Babe Ruth

New York Yankees

Babe Ruth Career

  • 2× All-Star (1933, 1934), 7× World Series champion (1915, 1916, 1918, 1923, 1927, 1928, 1932), AL MVP (1923), AL batting champion (1924), 12× AL home run leader (1918–1921, 1923, 1924, 1926–1931), 5× AL RBI leader (1919–1921, 1923, 1926), AL ERA leader (1916), New York Yankees No. 3 retired, Monument Park honoree, Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team, Other career achievements and records

Babe Ruth was one of the most popular and well-known athletes of his time. He is best known for his record breaking home run totals, but he also played in the outfield and pitcher during his career.

Born in 1895, Babe Ruth made his MLB debut with the Boston Red Sox on July 11th 1914 and would go on to play for seven different teams over a fourteen year career. His final MLB game was played with the Braves on May 30th, 1935.

In 2,873 games played, Babe Ruth hit 342 home runs which is an all-time record that still stands today. Additionally, he led the American League in batting average eight times and won three MVP Awards (1914-15). 

Known as "The Sultan of Swat", Ruth's antics off the field are legendary including bribing umpires and fighting with players from other teams - often leading to riots between fans.

However, despite all this controversy, it is clear that no one ever doubted Babe's talent as a player or person - even when he wasn't winning championships on the field. Although he retired after playing just five seasons in 1935 due to injuries sustained while boxing (he eventually died from them at 53 years old), 

There can be no doubt that without Babe Ruth baseball would not be what it is today - especially given his incredible impact both on and off the field.

Also Played For: baseball

27. Willie Mays

San Francisco Giants

Willie Mays Career

  • 24× All-Star (1954–1973), World Series champion (1954), 2× NL MVP (1954, 1965), NL Rookie of the Year (1951), 12× Gold Glove Award (1957–1968), Roberto Clemente Award (1971), NL batting champion (1954), 4× NL home run leader (1955, 1962, 1964, 1965), 4× NL stolen base leader (1956–1959), Hit 4 home runs in one game on April 30, 1961, San Francisco Giants No. 24 retired, New York Mets No. 24 retired, San Francisco Giants Wall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Willie Mays was one of the greatest players in baseball history and he is still considered one of the most iconic athletes. He was known for his power, speed, and batting ability.

His career spanned over five decades and he won numerous awards including three MVPs and an Oscar Award. Willie Mays passed away on September 9, 1973 after a long battle with cancer at the age of 51 years old.

Willie Mays was an all-time great outfielder who played for the Giants from 1951 to 1973. He won 24 All-Star games, and led the NL in home runs four times and stolen bases twice. In 1971, Willie Mays was awarded the Roberto Clemente Award, which is given to the best player in each league.

Willie Mays is also known for his record breaking performance on April 30th 1961 when he hit 4 home runs in one game against Philadelphia Phillies.

Also Played For: san francisco giants

28. Walter Johnson

Walter Johnson Career

  • World Series champion (1924), 2× AL MVP (1913, 1924), 3× Triple Crown (1913, 1918, 1924), 6× AL wins leader (1913–1916, 1918, 1924), 5× AL ERA leader (1912, 1913, 1918, 1919, 1924), 12× AL strikeout leader (1910, 1912–1919, 1921, 1923, 1924), Pitched a no-hitter on July 1, 1920, MLB record 110 career shutouts, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team, Washington Nationals Ring of Honor

Walter Johnson was a dominant pitcher in the early part of the 20th century. He won 417 games during his career and had an ERA of 2.17, which is unheard of for a pitcher that played that long ago.

Walter Johnson was born on November 6, 1887, in Humboldt, Kansas. His family later moved to Washington state where he started playing baseball at an early age. After playing minor league baseball for several years, Walter Johnson made his MLB debut with the Washington Senators in 1907 and proceeded to win 417 games over the next 27 seasons.

In 1927, at the age of 45, Walter Johnson announced his retirement from professional baseball after leading the Senators to their first ever championship game appearance (they lost). 

Today there is a statue of Walter Johnson located outside RFK Stadium in Washington D . C . It stands as one of America's most iconic sports statues and is often visited by fans who want to see if they can hit one off him.

29. Lou Gehrig

New York Yankees

Lou Gehrig Career

  • 7× All-Star (1933–1939), 6× World Series champion (1927, 1928, 1932, 1936–1938), 2× AL MVP (1927, 1936), Triple Crown (1934), AL batting champion (1934), 3× AL home run leader (1931, 1934, 1936), 5× AL RBI leader (1927, 1928, 1930, 1931, 1934), Hit 4 home runs in one game on June 3, 1932, New York Yankees captain (1935–1939), New York Yankees No. 4 retired, Monument Park honoree, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Lou Gehrig was one of the most successful baseball players in history, winning four MVP Awards and a record 73 consecutive games played without an error.

Gehrig's career was cut short by ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease), but his legacy lives on as one of the greatest first basemen to ever play the game. Lou Gehrig is also well known for his trademark "Hang 'em High" gesture after hitting a home run.

His funeral was attended by more than 2 million people, making him one of the most famous athletes in history. Lou Gehrig was a celebrated baseball player who played for the New York Yankees from 1923 to 1939. 

He is best remembered for his record-breaking home runs and RBIs, as well as being captain of the team during his time there.

Gehrig died in 1941 at the age of 37 due to ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), which left him wheelchair-bound and largely unable to speak or move on his own. 

In spite of this, he remains one of the most beloved players in MLB history, with numerous monuments and ceremonies dedicated to him throughout the league's storied history. 

His story has been told many times over by various writers, including books and even an award-winning movie released in 2013 starring Will Smith.

30. Ty Cobb

Ty Cobb Career

  • AL MVP (1911), Triple Crown (1909), 12× AL batting champion (1907–1915, 1917–1919), AL home run leader (1909), 4× AL RBI leader (1907–1909, 1911), 6× AL stolen base leader (1907, 1909, 1911, 1915–1917), Name honored by the Tigers, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, MLB record .366 career batting average

Ty Cobb was one of the greatest hitters and outfielders in baseball history. He retired with a batting average of .366 and 4,189 hits. Ty Cobb led the American League in batting five times and home runs four times.

In 1911, he became manager of the Tigers, leading them to two World Series titles (1913 and 1928). After his playing career ended, Cobb worked as a coach, scout, general manager and president of baseball teams. 

On July 17th 1961 at the age of 74 years old, Ty Cobb died after a long battle with cancer Ty Cobb was one of the most dominant hitters of his era and is widely regarded as one of the greatest baseball players ever.

He led the league in home runs nine times, batting titles 11 times, stolen bases eight times and total bases 16 times during his illustrious career. Cobb's greatness was also evident on the field; he won two World Series with Detroit as well as a record 12 American League batting championships.

A controversial figure throughout much of his life, Cobb nevertheless remains an iconic part of American sports history.

Also Played For: detroit tigers

31. Honus Wagner

Honus Wagner Career

  • World Series champion (1909), 8× NL batting champion (1900, 1903, 1904, 1906–1909, 1911), 5× NL RBI leader (1901, 1902, 1908, 1909, 1912), 5× NL stolen base leader (1901, 1902, 1904, 1907, 1908), Pittsburgh Pirates No. 33 retired, Pirates Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Honus Wagner is one of the most decorated players in baseball history, with three MVP awards and eleven batting titles to his name. He was a shortstop for most of his career, but he also played second base and third base from time to time.

Wagner led the National League in hits nine times, batting average six times, home runs twice, RBIs once, stolen bases four times and total bases sixteen times during his career. His success at the plate earned him the nickname "The Flying Dutchman" due to his ability to hit balls out of any ballpark he played in.

Wagner retired after playing only two seasons with Pittsburgh following World War I because of an arm injury sustained while serving in France during that conflict Wagner was a dominant hitter for many years, earning eight batting titles and five stolen base crowns. 

Wagner also managed and coached in the majors for over 30 years, helping his teams to numerous success including three World Series championships.

He is one of baseball's most iconic players and figures largely responsible for making Pittsburgh a major league city.

Also Played For: pittsburgh pirates

32. Greg Maddux

Atlanta Braves

Greg Maddux Career

  • 8× All-Star (1988, 1992, 1994–1998, 2000), World Series champion (1995), 4× NL Cy Young Award (1992–1995), 18× Gold Glove Award (1990–2002, 2004–2008), 3× NL wins leader (1992, 1994, 1995), 4× MLB ERA leader (1993–1995, 1998), Chicago Cubs No. 31 retired, Atlanta Braves No. 31 retired, Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame, Braves Hall of Fame

Greg Maddux was one of the most successful pitchers in MLB history. He won 355 games and lost 227, with a 3.16 ERA and 3,371 strikeouts. Maddux was born in San Angelo, Texas on April 14th 1966.

His baseball career started with the Chicago Cubs in 1986 and he spent his entire 18-year career there before moving to the Dodgers in 2008. 

Greg Maddux is widely considered to be one of the best pitchers ever, winning three Cy Young Awards (1994–1996) as well as seven other major awards throughout his career including MVP honors in 1996 and 1997 respectively.

He retired from professional baseball at the end of 2008 having achieved an overall record of 355 wins against 227 losses - making him one of only six players ever to have amassed over 300 victories while playing at least 20 years professionally.

33. Cy Young

Cy Young Career

  • World Series champion (1903), Triple Crown (1901), 5× Wins leader (1892, 1895, 1901–1903), 2× ERA leader (1892, 1901), 2× Strikeout leader (1896, 1901), Pitched a perfect game on May 5, 1904, Pitched three no-hitters (1897, 1904, 1908), Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, Cleveland Guardians Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, , MLB records, , 511 career wins, 7,356 career innings pitched, 815 career games started, 749 career complete games, 251⁄3 consecutive hitless innings pitched

Cy Young was one of the most accomplished pitchers in baseball history. He won over 500 games and had a 2.63 ERA, making him one of the best pitchers ever.

Cy Young began his career with the Cleveland Spiders in 1890 and went on to have a record of511-315 over 16 seasons with six different teams. In 1911, CyYoung reached his pinnacle as he led the Boston Rustlers to their first World Series title since 1907.

However, illness forced him to retire at the end of that season at age 38, still holding many records including most wins (511) and strikeouts (3283). Cy Young was a dominant pitcher throughout his career. He won over 100 games, led the league in strikeouts multiple times, and once held the record for most complete games in a season.

Cy Young is considered one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

34. Tom Seaver

New York Mets

Tom Seaver Career

  • 12× All-Star (1967–1973, 1975–1978, 1981), World Series champion (1969), 3× NL Cy Young Award (1969, 1973, 1975), NL Rookie of the Year (1967), 3× NL wins leader (1969, 1975, 1981), 3× NL ERA leader (1970, 1971, 1973), 5× NL strikeout leader (1970, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1976), Pitched a no-hitter on June 16, 1978, New York Mets No. 41 retired, New York Mets Hall of Fame, Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame

Tom Seaver was a dominant pitcher in the 1970s and 1980s. He won 311 games over his career and had an earned run average of only 2.86. Tom Seaver is best known for his record-breaking performance against the Boston Red Sox, where he went 39–17 with a 2.84 ERA in four seasons from 1984 to 1988.

Tom Seaver retired after the 1986 season, but came out of retirement briefly in 1990 before retiring permanently two years later at the age of 47 due to arthritis in his pitching arm. After retiring as a player, Tom Seaver worked as a television analyst for MLB teams until his death aged 75 in 2020.

Tom Seaver was one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history. He won three Cy Young Awards, led the NL in strikeouts five times, and pitched a no-hitter on June 16, 1978. Tom Seaver also had a reputation as one of the most difficult players to hit against. His career high strikeout rate is still an MLB record.

After leaving the Mets following the 1977 season, Tom Seaver played for Cincinnati Reds and then New York Mets before retiring at age 34 in 1982.

Also Played For: new york mets

35. Rube Foster

Rube Foster Career

  • Managerial record: 336–195–11
  • 4× Negro National League pennant (1920–1922, 1926)

Rube Foster was a hugely successful pitcher and manager in both the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball. He began his career with the Chicago Union Giants in 1902, before moving on to manage the Chicago American Giants later that year.

In 1917, he moved to the Boston Red Sox where he would stay for two seasons, managing them to a combined record of 36-36. After leaving baseball, Foster ran a grocery store in Kankakee, Illinois until his death from pneumonia at 51 years old in 1930.

Foster was one of the most successful managers in Negro National League history, leading Chicago American Giants to four pennants and a World Series championship. Foster also played for several teams during his career, including the Louisville White Sox and Chicago Union Giants.

He is considered one of the pioneers of African American baseball management and has been honored by both the Negro Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum as well as numerous other organizations.

Also Played For: negro league baseball, chicago american giants

36. Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson Career

  • NgL All-Star (1945), 6× All-Star (1949–1954), World Series champion (1955), NL MVP (1949), MLB Rookie of the Year (1947), NL batting champion (1949), 2× NL stolen base leader (1947, 1949), Los Angeles Dodgers No. 42 retired, No. 42 retired by all MLB teams, UCLA Bruins No. 42 retired[1], Monument Park honoree, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Jackie Robinson was born on January 31, 1919 in Cairo, Georgia. He broke the color barrier in MLB with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, becoming the first African American to play major league baseball.

Robinson went on to have an illustrious career as a second baseman and player-manager for several teams before retiring from MLB in 1956. After his retirement from playing baseball.

He became a successful civil rights activist and served as chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) until his death in 1972 at age 53 years old.

Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball. He broke baseball's color barrier in 1947 and became an icon for civil rights movements across America.

 Robinson continued to play successfully into his late 40s, becoming a Hall of Fame player and leading the Dodgers to their only World Series victory. Jackie Robinson died at age 53 in April 1972 after a long battle with cancer.

Also Played For: los angeles dodgers

37. John Henry Lloyd

John Henry Lloyd Career

  • Batting average: .349
  • Hits: 569
  • Runs batted in: 308
  • Lifetime batting average: .349 (Negro leagues), Eastern Colored League pennant (1923)

Lloyd was a shortstop who played in the Negro leagues from 1906 to 1932. He had a batting average of .349 and 569 hits in his career. Lloyd died at age 79 after an illness in 1964.

Lloyd was born on October 15, 1878 in Columbus, Ohio. Lloyd began playing professional baseball with the Columbus Buckeyes of the American Association in 1901. 

He made his major league debut with the Philadelphia Giants in 1907 and played for them until 1909 when he joined the Cuban X-Giants of the National League.

Lloyd rejoined Philadelphia two years later and spent another four seasons with them before being traded to the Leland Giants midway through 1910 season. After one year as manager of that team, he took over as player/manager of the Chicago American Giants for three more seasons (1914–17). 

In 1921, John Henry became manager of Hilldale Club where he remained for five seasons before retiring from baseball at age 35 in 1927.

38. Martín Dihigo

Martín Dihigo Career

  • 2× Negro League All-Star (1935, 1945), 4× Cuban League MVP (1927/28, 1935/36, 1936/37, 1941/42), Eastern Colored League batting champion (1926), Only player in History to be elected to 5 different Hall of Fames, Elected to Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame (1951), Elected to Mexican Baseball Hall of Fame (1964), Elected to Venezuelan Hall of Fame, Elected to Dominican Hall of Fame, , Cuban League records, , 107 career wins, 121 career complete games, , Mexican League records, , .676 career winning percentage ( > 1,000 innings)

Dihigo was a pitcher and second baseman who played for several teams in Cuba and Mexico. He had a batting average of .307 and 436 hits in his Cuban league career, along with 68 home runs.

Dihigo also made 309 runs batted in during his Mexican League career, playing for Águila de Veracruz between 1950-1951. Martín Dihigo died at the age of 64 after a long illness on May 20th, 1971.

Martín Dihigo was a Cuban baseball player who had a long and successful career in the Negro leagues. He is best known for his time with the New York Cubans, where he won three championships. After retiring from playing, Dihigo served as manager of several teams in Cuba and Mexico.

39. Ernie Banks

Ernie Banks Career

  • 14× All-Star (1955–1960², 1961²–1962², 1965, 1967, 1969), 2× NL MVP (1958, 1959), Gold Glove Award (1960), 2× NL home run leader (1958, 1960), 2× NL RBI leader (1958, 1959), Chicago Cubs No. 14 retired, Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Ernie Banks was a Hall of Fame shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs. He won nine Gold Glove Awards, three National League MVP Awards, and two World Series championships.

Ernie Banks was born in Dallas, Texas on January 31st 1931. His father played professional baseball and his older brother also became a major league player. 

After playing football at San Antonio College, Ernie signed with the Chicago Cubs as an amateur free agent in 1951.

He made his MLB debut that year and went on to play 19 seasons for the Cubs before retiring after the 1971 season. During his career, Banks set numerous records including most hits (2,583), home runs (675), RBIs (1,409), slugging percentage (.609) and total bases (4,849). 

He is also third all-time in doubles (382) behind only Stan Musial and Hank Aaron. In 1969 he became just the second player ever to lead both leagues in batting average (.406) while winning MVP honors both leagues - joining Ty Cobb. 

Following his retirement from baseball Ernie spent several years working as a television sportscaster before passing away at age 83 on January 23rd 2015 due to complications from Alzheimer's Disease.

40. Bud Fowler

Bud Fowler

Bud Fowler was a player, manager and scout in the early days of baseball. He played for several teams in his career, but is most famous for being the manager of the Boston Red Sox from 1902 to 1909.

Although he had some success as a manager, Bud Fowler is best known for what he did off the field; namely helping to develop modern scouting techniques and introducing scientific methods to baseball management.

Bud Fowler passed away in 1913 at 54 years old after a long period of illness. Bud Fowler was one of the most popular and successful Negro League players ever. He played in the leagues from 1895 to 1898, and during that time he led his team to two championships.

Fowler was a powerful hitter who could hit for both power and average. In 1896, he hit 38 home runs and drove in 113 RBIs, which is still an all-time record for a Negro League player.

 After playing in the Negro Leagues, Bud Fowler went on to play Major League Baseball with several different teams including the Boston Americans (1903), Chicago White Sox (1906-1909), Cincinnati Reds (1920) and Philadelphia Phillies (1921).

Bud Fowler was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1992 as part of the first class of African American players, along with Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson.

41. Sandy Koufax

Los Angeles Dodgers

Sandy Koufax Career

  • 7× All-Star (1961–1962, 1963–1966), 4× World Series champion (1955, 1959, 1963, 1965), NL MVP (1963), 3× Cy Young Award (1963, 1965, 1966), 2× World Series MVP (1963, 1965), 3× Triple Crown (1963, 1965, 1966), 3× MLB wins leader (1963, 1965, 1966), 5× NL ERA leader (1962–1966), 4× MLB strikeout leader (1961, 1963, 1965, 1966), Pitched a perfect game on September 9, 1965, Pitched four no-hitters, Los Angeles Dodgers No. 32 retired, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Sandy Koufax was a legendary pitcher who played for the Dodgers from 1955 to 1966. He won 165 games in his career and had an ERA of 2.76. Sandy Koufax also led the National League in strikeouts twice, with 2,396 total over his career.

Although he retired after the 1966 season, Sandy Koufax is still considered one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history and is often referred to as "The Great Koufax". 

Sandy Koufax was born on December 30th, 1935 in Brooklyn, New York and died on January 17th, 2017 at 87 years old Sandy Koufax was an outstanding pitcher in both the Negro Leagues and Major League Baseball.

He won 7 All-Star games, 4 World Series championships, 3 Cy Young Awards and 2 World Series MVPs. Sandy Koufax is one of only two pitchers to ever pitch a perfect game in MLB history (the other being Roger Clemens). 

In 1965, at the age of 22 years old, Sandy Koufax became the first pitcher in MLB history to throw four no-hitters. Sandy Koufax retired from baseball after the 1966 season with 499 career wins and 548 strikeouts.

Also Played For: dodgers

42. Tom Glavine

Pitcher

Tom Glavine Career

  • 10× All-Star (1991–1993, 1996–1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006), World Series champion (1995), 2× NL Cy Young Award (1991, 1998), World Series MVP (1995), 4× Silver Slugger Award (1991, 1995, 1996, 1998), 5× NL wins leader (1991–1993, 1998, 2000), Atlanta Braves No. 47 retired, Braves Hall of Fame

Tom Glavine is a former pitcher who played for the Atlanta Braves and New York Mets. He had a win-loss record of 305–203 and an earned run average of 3.54.

Glavine was born on March 25, 1966, in Concord, Massachusetts. Glavine batted left and threw left-handed. Tom Glavine made his MLB debut with the Atlanta Braves in 1987 and ended his career with the same team in 2008.

In 2,607 appearances over 17 seasons (1987–2008), Tom Glavine struck out 2,607 batters while compiling a winning percentage of .605%. After retiring from baseball, TomGlavin has worked as an analyst for Turner Sports' coverage of Major League Baseball on TNT.

Tom Glavine was an All-Star pitcher for 10 seasons and won two Cy Young Awards. He is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and his uniform number 47 has been retired by the Atlanta Braves. Tom Glavine helped lead the Atlanta Braves to their only World Series victory in 1995.

43. John Smoltz

Pitcher

John Smoltz Career

  • 8× All-Star (1989, 1992, 1993, 1996, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007), World Series champion (1995), NL Cy Young Award (1996), NLCS MVP (1992), Silver Slugger Award (1997), NL Rolaids Relief Man Award (2002), Roberto Clemente Award (2005), 2× NL wins leader (1996, 2006), 2× NL strikeout leader (1992, 1996), NL saves leader (2002), Atlanta Braves No. 29 retired, Braves Hall of Fame

John Smoltz is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball who enjoyed a lengthy and successful career with the Atlanta Braves, St. Louis Cardinals, and Boston Red Sox.

John Smoltz was born on May 15th, 1967 in Warren, Michigan and grew up playing baseball for his school team before signing with the Braves as an undrafted free agent in 1988.

After debuting that summer, he quickly became one of Atlanta's top pitchers and won three consecutive National League Cy Young Awards from 1991 to 1993. 

His success continued into the late 1990s when he helped lead the Cardinals to their first World Series championship since 1926 en route to four more division titles between 1999 and 2003.

In 2009 however, after suffering two knee injuries that forced him out of action for almost half a season, Smoltz retired at age 38 after 19 seasons in professional baseball. 

Since then he has become a popular analyst on MLB broadcasts alongside his son Brennan, working most notably for Fox Sports Midwest and Turner Broadcasting's coverage of Major League Soccer.

44. Dave Winfield

Dave Winfield Career

  • 12× All-Star (1977–1988), World Series champion (1992), 7× Gold Glove Award (1979, 1980, 1982–1985, 1987), 6× Silver Slugger Award (1981–1985, 1992), Roberto Clemente Award (1994), NL RBI leader (1979), San Diego Padres No. 31 retired, San Diego Padres Hall of Fame

Dave Winfield is one of the most successful and well-known players in baseball history. He played for San Diego and Cleveland and is in the Hall of Fame.

Winfield was a right fielder who hit 3,110 hits and 465 home runs in his career. He was an All-Star eleven times and won three MVP Awards. Winfield was also a good fielder and led the league in fielding percentage twice.

Winfield retired after the 1995 season. Dave Winfield was one of the most accomplished and successful hitters in baseball history. He was a 12-time All-Star, a World Series champion, and a seven-time Silver Slugger Award winner.

Winfield is best known for his long career with the San Diego Padres, where he was a key player in their success in the 1970s and 1980s. He retired in 1998 after playing for the New York Yankees and California Angels. Winfield was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000.

45. Christy Mathewson

Pitcher

Christy Mathewson Career

  • 2× World Series champion (1905, 1921), 2× Triple Crown (1905, 1908), 4× NL wins leader (1905, 1907, 1908, 1910), 5× NL ERA leader (1905, 1908, 1909, 1911, 1913), 5× NL strikeout leader (1903–1905, 1907, 1908), Pitched two no-hitters, Name honored by the Giants, Major League Baseball All-Century Team
  • Position(s): Fullback
  • College: Bucknell
  • High school: Keystone Academy
  • Pittsburgh Stars 1902 Championship team

Christy Mathewson was one of the most dominant pitchers in MLB history. He led his teams to three World Series championships and won two MVP Awards. Mathewson was born in Pennsylvania and started his career with the New York Giants.

He was one of the first pitchers to throw a curveball and was one of the most feared hitters in the league. Mathewson left the game for good in 1916, but he is still considered one of the greatest pitchers in MLB history. His win-loss record is 373-188 and he is second all-time in strikeouts with 2,502.

Christy Mathewson was one of the most dominant pitchers in baseball history, winning two World Series and five NL ERA titles. 

He is also famous for pitching two no-hitters, and is one of only four pitchers to accomplish the feat. Mathewson was a popular player and manager, and was honored by the Giants with a statue in his honor.

46. Jim Kaat

Jim Kaat Career

  • 3× All Star (1962², 1966, 1975), World Series champion (1982), 16× Gold Glove Award (1962–1977), AL wins leader (1966), Minnesota Twins No. 36 retired, Minnesota Twins Hall of Fame

Jim Kaat was one of the most successful pitchers in Major League Baseball history. He won over 283 games and finished with a 3.45 ERA. Kaat was a left-handed pitcher and batted left-handed.

He was drafted by the Washington Senators in 1959 and made his MLB debut the following year. Kaat played for the St. Louis Cardinals from 1983 to 1983. Kaat is a four-time All-Star and was the National League MVP in 1978.

Kaat is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame and was inducted in 1984. Kaat is a Zeeland, Michigan, native and remains active in charity work. Kaat was an All Star pitcher for the Washington Senators, White Sox, Phillies and Yankees during his 15-year playing career.

Kaat was a 16-time Gold Glove Award winner and was the winningest pitcher in Minnesota Twins history. Kaat was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022.

47. Tris Speaker

Boston Red Sox

Tris Speaker Career

  • 3× World Series champion (1912, 1915, 1920), AL MVP (1912), AL batting champion (1916), AL home run leader (1912), AL RBI leader (1923), Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, Cleveland Guardians Hall of Fame, , MLB Records, , 792 career doubles, 449 career outfield assists

Tris Speaker was a center fielder who played for the Boston Americans and Philadelphia Athletics in the early 1900s. Tris Speaker was one of the most consistent hitters in MLB history, batting over .300 for eight seasons and reaching the 3,000-hit mark.

Tris Speaker was a powerful hitter who hit home runs at a high rate, and his 117 homers are still a record. Tris Speaker was also a good fielder, throwing out runners at a high rate and earning three MVP awards. Tris Speaker retired from baseball in 1928 after a final season with the Philadelphia Athletics.

He died in 1958 at the age of 70. As one of the most famous and successful players in baseball history, Speaker also enjoyed a lengthy managerial career which included multiple World Series championships. 

Tris Speaker is most remembered for his stellar play as a left-handed batter, which helped him rack up impressive batting and home run numbers.

As a manager, Speaker was equally as successful, presiding over several championship-winning teams throughout his career. Tris Speaker was a fixture in the baseball world for over a century, and his impact on the sport will long be remembered.

Also Played For: cleveland indians

48. Derek Jeter

Infielder

Derek Jeter Career

  • 14× All-Star (1998–2002, 2004, 2006–2012, 2014), 5× World Series champion (1996, 1998–2000, 2009), World Series MVP (2000), AL Rookie of the Year (1996), 5× Gold Glove Award (2004–2006, 2009, 2010), 5× Silver Slugger Award (2006–2009, 2012), 2× AL Hank Aaron Award (2006, 2009), Roberto Clemente Award (2009), New York Yankees No. 2 retired, Monument Park honoree

Derek Jeter is a shortstop who has been a part of the New York Yankees organization for over 20 years. He has won five World Series titles, three AL MVP Awards, and four Gold Gloves.

Jeter was drafted by the Yankees in the first round of the 1992 MLB Draft. He made his MLB debut in 1995 and has since been a mainstay in the lineup. Jeter has set numerous records during his career, including the record for most hits by a shortstop and most home runs by a shortstop.

He is also the all-time leader in runs batted in. Jeter has been a model citizen both on and off the field. 

He has founded the Derek Jeter Foundation to help disadvantaged children and has raised over $130 million for various charities. Jeter is a popular figure in the baseball community and has been honored with numerous awards and accolades.

He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2013 and is a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Walk of Fame. Jeter is retired from baseball and is currently a senior vice president with the Yankees.

49. Mariano Rivera

Pitcher

Mariano Rivera Career

  • 13× All-Star (1997, 1999–2002, 2004–2006, 2008–2011, 2013), 5× World Series champion (1996, 1998–2000, 2009), World Series MVP (1999), ALCS MVP (2003), 5× AL Rolaids Relief Man Award (1999, 2001, 2004–2005, 2009), 3× Delivery Man of the Year (2005–2006, 2009), AL Comeback Player of the Year (2013), 3× MLB saves leader (1999, 2001, 2004), MLB record 652 career saves, New York Yankees No. 42 retired, Monument Park honoree

Rivera is a relief pitcher who played for the Yankees from 1995 to 2013. Rivera has a 82-60 record and a 2.21 earned run average. Rivera has 1,173 strikeouts and 652 saves in his MLB career.

Rivera is a three-time All-Star and a five-time World Series champion. Rivera is retiring at the end of the 2013 season. Rivera retired as the all-time saves leader in MLB and is a three-time AL comeback player of the year.

Rivera was a member of the Yankees for 13 seasons and won five World Series titles. He was a dominant reliever for the Yankees and is still remembered for his fantastic performances. Rivera is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame and was honored with a statue in Monument Park.

50. Connie Mack

Connie Mack Career

  • 5× World Series champion (1910, 1911, 1913, 1929, 1930), Most managerial wins, losses and games managed in major league history, Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, Athletics Hall of Fame

Connie Mack was an all-time great baseball manager and catcher. Mack played for the Washington Nationals and Pittsburgh Pirates. He led both teams to championships in his career.

Mack was nicknamed "The Old Man" because of his age. Mack passed away in 1956 at the age of 93. Connie Mack was a manager in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Mack led his teams to five World Series championships.

He was also a successful player, winning five World Series championships and batting .486. Mack is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame and the Athletics Hall of Fame. He died in 1950 at the age of eighty-one.

Final Words

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is home to some of the greatest players of all time. From Ty Cobb to Babe Ruth, these players have left an indelible mark on the game of baseball.

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Kevin Smith

I am a dedicated learner who is constantly pursuing my dreams in many areas of life. I am a Finance major at the University of Maryland, a professional baseball player for the Toronto Blue Jays and the owner of my personal brand, Elevate Baseball. I hope to inspire younger learners of all sports and interests to tirelessly pursue their dreams, whatever that may be. LinkedIn

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