Washington Football Team Best Players of All Time

The Washington Football Team is a professional American football team based in the Washington metropolitan area. Founded as an NFL expansion franchise in 1932, they are now one of the oldest teams in the league and have been members of the NFC East division since their inception. The team has seen many highs and lows throughout its history but recently won their first Super Bowl title in 2019-20 under head coach Ron Rivera. Led by quarterback Dwayne Haskins and defensive leader Ryan Kerrigan, this organization strives to bring excitement to fans all over DC every Sunday during game season.

1. Chase Young

Defensive end

Chase Young Career

  • NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year (2020)
  • Pro Bowl (2020)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2020)
  • Big Ten Male Athlete of the Year (2020)
  • Bronko Nagurski Trophy (2019)
  • Chuck Bednarik Award (2019)
  • Ted Hendricks Award (2019)
  • Chicago Tribune Silver Football (2019)
  • Nagurski–Woodson Defensive Player of the Year (2019)
  • Smith–Brown Defensive Lineman of the Year (2019)
  • Unanimous All-American (2019)
  • First-team All-Big Ten (2019)
  • Second-team All-Big Ten (2018)

In 2020, Chase Young was drafted by the Washington Football Team in the 1st round. He played at Ohio State from 2017-2019 and had a successful collegiate career with 52 tackles, 10 sacks and 2 interceptions.

In 2020, he made his NFL debut against Arizona and recorded 3 tackles including one for a loss. His stats have continued to improve since then; in 2019 he recorded 12 sacks and has continued to be an impactful player for the team this season (2021).

Chase Young was an all-around standout for the Wolverines during his four years at Michigan. He was a three-time First Team All-Big Ten selection and two time Second Team All-Big Ten pick, as well as being voted onto several national award ballots, including the Associated Press Top 25 poll and the Walter Camp Award ballot in 2020.

He finished second on Michigan’s career tackles list with 73 total stops in 128 games played, while also accumulating nine sacks (tied for seventh all-time) and six forced fumbles (second most all-time). After declaring early for the 2020 NFL Draft, Young impressed scouts enough to be selected by the Philadelphia Eagles with their first round draft pick that year – 14th overall – becoming just the 10th Wolverine ever drafted into professional football.

2. Brandon Scherff

Guard

Brandon Scherff Career

  • First-team All-Pro (2020)
  • 5× Pro Bowl (2016, 2017, 2019–2021)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2015)
  • Outland Trophy (2014)
  • Rimington–Pace Offensive Lineman of the Year (2014)
  • Unanimous All-American (2014)
  • First-team All-Big Ten (2014)

Scherff is a six-foot-five, 319-pound guard for the Jacksonville Jaguars. Scherff played college football at Iowa and was drafted by the Washington Redskins in 2015.

In his two seasons with the Redskins, he made 54 starts at left guard. He was traded to the Jacksonville Jaguars in February 2022 and has started all 48 games there since then, including 13 this season as one of their captains.

Scherff is considered one of the best guards in NFL history and his impact on both sides of the ball has been immense, particularly on defense where he’s a key part of an elite unit that ranks first overall in yards allowed per game (283).

As captain of the team this year, Scherff led them to their first AFC South title since 1999 while also being named second team All American and First Team All Pro at guard by ESPN analysts Mel Kiper Jr., Todd McShay and Daniel Jeremiah respectively.

Brandon Scherff is an All-Pro offensive lineman for the Washington Redskins. Brandon Scherff was a unanimous first-team all-American in 2014 and won the Outland Trophy as the nation's top interior lineman that year. Brandon Scherff has started 99 games in his NFL career, including 99 of 100 possible starts over six seasons with the Redskins.

Brandon Scherff was drafted by Washington in 2015 and has been one of their most consistent players ever since then, making him a key member of their team moving forward.

3. Jonathan Allen

Defensive lineman

Jonathan Allen Career

  • 2× Pro Bowl (2021, 2022)
  • CFP national champion (2015)
  • Bronko Nagurski Trophy (2016)
  • Chuck Bednarik Award (2016)
  • Ted Hendricks Award (2016)
  • Lombardi Award (2016)
  • SEC Defensive Player of the Year (2016)
  • Unanimous All-American (2016)
  • 3× first-team All-SEC (2014–2016)

Jonathan Allen was a highly-touted defensive tackle prospect coming out of high school and he attended Alabama for two seasons before being drafted by the Redskins in 2017.

He has started all 16 games for Washington this season, recording 36 tackles and 2 sacks. Allen is also known as an excellent run defender due to his ability to occupy multiple blockers and make plays around the line of scrimmage.

Jonathan Allen was a dominant player in college and earned numerous accolades, including three first-team All-SEC selections. Allen entered the NFL as one of the top defensive prospects and quickly established himself as a premier lineman.

He has been selected to two Pro Bowls and won several awards, including the Chuck Bednarik Award and Ted Hendricks Award. Allen is an relentless defender who is always involved in the action on defense; he will be crucial to Washington's success this season.

4. Sammy Baugh

Sammy Baugh Career

  • 2× NFL champion (1937, 1942)
  • 4× First-team All-Pro (1937, 1940, 1942, 1943)
  • 4× Second-team All-Pro (1938, 1941, 1947, 1948)
  • 6× Pro Bowl (1938–1942, 1951)
  • 4× NFL passing yards leader (1937, 1940, 1947, 1948)
  • 2× NFL passing touchdowns leader (1940, 1947)
  • 3× NFL passer rating leader (1940, 1945, 1947)
  • 8× NFL completion percentage leader (1940, 1942, 1943, 1945–1949)
  • 5× NFL punting average leader (1940–1945) [1]
  • NFL punting yards leader (1943)
  • NFL interceptions (made) leader (1943)
  • NFL 1940s All-Decade Team
  • NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Washington Commanders No. 33 retired
  • Consensus All-American (1936)
  • Second-team All-American (1935)
  • TCU Horned Frogs No. 45 retired

Sammy Baugh was one of the most successful quarterbacks in NFL history. He played for 14 seasons and led his teams to 10 playoff appearances, winning three Super Bowls (1946, 1957, and 1963).

Sammy Baugh also had a long career as a punter and safety. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1970. Sammy Baugh died on December 17, 2008 at the age of 94 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease for several years.

Sammy Baugh was an American football player who played for the Washington Redskins and Houston Oilers. He was a three-time NFL passing champion, as well as one of the most prolific passers in league history. A native of Austin, Texas, Baugh attended Hardin–Simmons University before being drafted by the Redskins in 1937.

He spent six seasons with Washington before moving to the Oilers during World War II. After rejoining Washington in 1945, Baugh led his team to two more Super Bowl championships and remains one of only four players to win multiple titles with different teams (alongside Jim Brown, Fran Tarkenton and Jerry Rice). In retirement, Baugh served as head coach at SMU from 1961 until his death in 1965.

5. Darrell Green

Defensive back

Darrell Green Career

  • 2× Super Bowl champion (XXII, XXVI)
  • NFL Man of the Year (1996)
  • 4× First-team All-Pro (1986, 1987, 1990, 1991)
  • 7× Pro Bowl (1984, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1991, 1996, 1997)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (1983)
  • NFL 1990s All-Decade Team
  • NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Bart Starr Award (1997)

Darrell Green is a former cornerback who played for the Washington Redskins from 1983 to 2002. He was named First-Team All-Pro five times and Second-Team All-Pro twice during his career with Washington.

Darrell also won two Super Bowls with the Redskins, in 1991 and 1992. After retiring as a player, he served as an assistant coach for the Cleveland Browns (2003–2006) and Philadelphia Eagles (2007). In January 2019, Green was hired as head coach of the Memphis Express of the Alliance of American Football league.

Darrell Green was a five-time Pro Bowl selection and two-time Super Bowl champion with the Washington Redskins. He is one of just eight players in NFL history to have more than 1,000 tackles, 50 interceptions and 10 touchdowns. In 1997 he was named the Bart Starr Award recipient for his distinguished career in football.

Darrell Green remains the all-time leader in INTs by an opposing player (54) and has been inducted into both the NFC and AFC hall of famers as well as both professional football's halls of fame.

6. Dexter Manley

Dexter Manley Career

  • 2× Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII)
  • First-team All-Pro (1986)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1987)
  • Pro Bowl (1986)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Dex Manley was a successful defensive end in the NFL for almost 20 years. He played for three different teams and recorded over 100 tackles and 10 sacks during his career.

Dex Manley is probably most well-known for his time with the Washington Redskins, where he helped lead the team to two Super Bowl appearances (1982, 1987). In 1990, Dex Manley was traded to the Phoenix Cardinals and spent four seasons there before retiring at the end of 1994 season.

Since retiring from football, Dex Manley has worked as a television analyst for various sports networks in America. Dexter Manley was a linebacker for the Ottawa Rough Riders and Shreveport Pirates in the NFL. He won two Super Bowls with the Eagles (XVII, XXII) and is one of only six players to win both an MVP award (1986) and a Pro Bowl honor (1986).

Dexter played collegiately at Southern Methodist University before being drafted by Philadelphia in the fourth round of the 1986 NFL draft. After playing briefly for Washington in 1988, Manley spent most of his time with Philadelphia from 1986-1992 where he helped lead Philly to three consecutive NFC Championship games as well as their first ever Super Bowl victory against San Francisco 49ers.

In 1993, Dexter signed with Shreveport but never appeared in a game for them due to injuries; after retiring from football he moved into coaching stints at various levels including college and high school level until his retirement in 2010.

7. John Riggins

Running back

John Riggins Career

  • Super Bowl champion (XVII)
  • Super Bowl MVP (XVII)
  • NFL Comeback Player of the Year (1978)
  • First-team All-Pro (1983)
  • Pro Bowl (1975)
  • 2× NFL rushing touchdowns leader (1983, 1984)
  • NFL 1980s All-Decade Team
  • Bert Bell Award (1983)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Washington Redskins Ring of Fame

John Riggins was a halfback in the NFL for 13 seasons, playing with the Jets, Redskins and Chargers. He is best known for his durability – he played in over 1,000 consecutive games from 1971 to 1985 – and scoring ability.

John Riggins has also been involved in broadcasting since retiring from football; he currently works as an analyst on FOX Sports' coverage of college football. In 2006, John Riggins was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame John Riggins was a Hall of Fame running back who helped lead the Washington Redskins to victory in Super Bowl XVII and MVP honors.

He also enjoyed success on the field with the Dallas Cowboys, Philadelphia Eagles and New York Giants before retiring in 1992. In recognition of his accomplishments, John Riggins was inducted into both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and College Football Hall of Fame in 1995. Today, he is known as an ambassador for children's charities and enjoys spending time with his family.

8. Art Monk

Wide receiver

Art Monk Career

  • 3× Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI)
  • First-team All-Pro (1984)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1985)
  • 3× Pro Bowl (1984–1986)
  • NFL receptions leader (1984)
  • NFL 1980s All-Decade Team
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (1980)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • First-team All-American (1979)

Art Monk was a wide receiver for the Washington Redskins and New York Jets in the NFL. He is best known for his time with the Redskins, where he helped lead them to three Super Bowl appearances (1981-1983).

After leaving the NFL, Monk went on to play for the Philadelphia Eagles and then finally retired from playing football in 1995. In 2012, Art Monk was inducted into the United States Department of Agriculture's Hall of Fame during its 150th anniversary celebration.

Now 65 years old, Art continues to work as an NFL analyst for Fox Sports 1 and ESPN Radio networks. Art Monk was a dominant wide receiver in the NFL for over 20 years. He is one of only two players ever to win three Super Bowls, and he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1998.

He also received multiple honors, including being named first-team All-Pro four times and second-team All-Pro twice. Monk's career came to an end due to injury, but he remains one of the most decorated receivers in NFL history.

9. Sean Taylor

Safety

Sean Taylor Career

  • Second-team All-Pro (2007)
  • 2× Pro Bowl (2006, 2007)[2]
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2004)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Washington Commanders No. 21 retired
  • BCS national champion (2001)
  • Big East Defensive Player of the Year (2003)
  • Unanimous All-American (2003)
  • First-team All-Big East (2003)
  • Second-team All-Big East (2002)
  • Jack Tatum Trophy (2003)

Sean Taylor was a safety for the Washington Redskins from 2004-2007. He played in 114 games, recording 5 interceptions and 44 tackles during his career.

On November 27th 2007, Sean Taylor was shot and killed by an unknown assailant while he was playing football at home in Miami, Florida. The death of Sean Taylor has raised awareness about gun violence and its impact on society as a whole.

The NFL is currently working to create harsher punishments for people who commit gun crimes, in honor of Sean Taylor's memory Sean Taylor was an All-Pro safety for the Washington Redskins and a two-time Pro Bowler. He was considered one of the best players in the NFL, even earning first team all-conference honors as a junior and senior at Virginia Tech.

In his rookie season he led the league with 12 interceptions and helped lead Washington to their first playoff appearance in 10 years. His death at just 24 years old shocked many football fans around the world, but his legacy will live on forever through his numerous awards and accomplishments

10. Joe Theismann

Quarterback

Joe Theismann Career

  • Super Bowl champion (XVII)
  • NFL Most Valuable Player (1983)
  • NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1983)
  • NFL Man of the Year (1982)
  • First-team All-Pro (1983)
  • 2× Pro Bowl (1982, 1983)
  • Bert Bell Award (1982)
  • 2× CFL All-Star (1971, 1973)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Washington Redskins Ring of Fame
  • First-team All-American (1970)

Joe Theismann was a quarterback for the Washington Redskins from 1974-1985. He is best known for leading the Redskins to their first Super Bowl victory in 1984, and earning First Team All-Pro honors four times during his career.

In 1991, Joe Theismann became the third player in NFL history to throw for over 50,000 yards and rush for over 10,000 yards. Joe Theismann retired from professional football following the 1985 season with an all-time record of 53–33–1 as a starter.

After retiring from playing football, he served as an analyst on NBC's Sunday Night Football game broadcasts until 2003. In 2012, Joe Theismann was inducted into both the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame Joe Theismann is a two-time Pro Bowler and NFL Most Valuable Player.

He played quarterback for the Washington Redskins in the 1980s and led them to three Super Bowl appearances, including their first win in 1983. After retirement from football, Joe became an analyst on NFL broadcasts and served as president of the Washington Redskins Ring of Fame from 2002 to 2009. In March 2010, he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma but continued working until his death at 74 in December 2017

11. Mark Moseley

Placekicker

Mark Moseley Career

  • Super Bowl champion (XVII)
  • NFL Most Valuable Player (1982)
  • UPI NFC Player of the Year (1982)
  • First-team All-Pro (1982)
  • 2× Pro Bowl (1979, 1982)
  • NFL scoring leader (1983)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Mark Moseley is one of the most successful placekickers in NFL history. He has kicked more than 2,000 career points and is fifth all-time in field goal percentage (83.9%).

Moseley was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in 1970 and spent his first four seasons with the team before joining Houston Oilers for two years. In 1974, he joined the Washington Redskins where he remained until 1986.

During that time, Moseley led the Redskins to three Super Bowl appearances (1982, 1984, 1985). After leaving Washington, Moseley played for various teams including Philadelphia Eagles (1987–1992), Detroit Lions (1993), Cleveland Browns (1994) and Carolina Panthers (1995).

Mark retired from professional football after playing a season with Arizona Cardinals in 1997 but returned to play on occasion thereafter until 2006 when he announced his retirement once again at age 54 . Mark Moseley was a standout linebacker for the Cleveland Browns from 1986 to 1989.

He played in three Super Bowls with the team, and won MVP honors in 1982. After playing his entire career with the Browns, he retired after the 1989 season. Moseley is a member of both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and Washington Commanders Ring of Fame, having been inducted in 1998 and 2003 respectively.

In addition to his football accomplishments, Mark also has two degrees: an MBA from Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management and a JD from Georgetown Law Center. Currently, he is a partner at Kirkland & Ellis LLP where he practices law focused on sports law issues including antitrust litigation and collective bargaining agreements..

Moseley lives in Seattle with his wife Terri and their four children Jordan (21), Sydney (18), Connor (16), Jacob (11).

12. Terry McLaurin

Wide receiver

Terry McLaurin Career

  • Pro Bowl (2022)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2019)

McLaurin was a standout receiver at Cathedral High School in Indianapolis. He announced his decision to enter the NFL Draft early, and went on to be drafted 76th overall by the Washington Commanders in 2019.

McLaurin had an impressive collegiate career with Ohio State, compiling 1,153 yards and 12 touchdowns on 128 receptions over three seasons. He entered the league as a rookie that year and showed some promise, recording 39 catches for 517 yards and one touchdown before being traded to the San Francisco 49ers in 2020.

After two somewhat disappointing seasons with SF, McLaurin was dealt back to Washington just prior to the start of 2021 season where he recorded 43 receptions for 611 yards and four touchdowns - his highest marks yet in terms of both yardage and scores。 The wide receiver is currently playing for the New Orleans Saints after signing there as a free agent this offseason Terry McLaurin is the current Washington Redskins' quarterback.

He was drafted in the fifth round of the 2019 NFL Draft by the Redskins. Prior to being drafted, he played college football at Ohio State University where he won Big Ten Quarterback of The Year honors and a National Championship. In his rookie season with Washington, McLaurin completed 57% of his passes for 2,667 yards and 16 touchdowns while also rushing for 381 yards and two scores on 58 carries (5th most in NFL). In 2020, McLaurin led Washington to an 11-5 record as their starting QB before injuring his shoulder late in the season and missing playoffs altogether due to injury; they finished second in NFC East behind eventual Super Bowl Champion Philadelphia Eagles..

As a result of this injury, Terry underwent surgery which caused him to miss all offseason workouts leading up to 2021 training camp but returned fully healthy for preseason games only... however that's when things started going downhill as injuries once again plagued him throughout year culminating with another lost season due to arm issues - ultimately ending his tenure with Washingon after just two years overall playing time (44 total plays).

13. London Fletcher

Linebacker

London Fletcher Career

  • Super Bowl champion (XXXIV)
  • 2× Second-team All-Pro (2011, 2012)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (2009–2012)
  • Bart Starr Award (2012)
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest

Fletcher was drafted by the St. Louis Rams in 1998, but did not see any action there until 2002. He then spent three seasons with the Buffalo Bills before signing with Washington Redskins in 2007.

In 2013, he retired from professional football after 11 seasons playing for four different teams. Fletcher is a two-time Pro Bowler and has also been named to multiple All-Pro lists throughout his career.

He led the NFL in solo tackles for three consecutive years (2007–2009) and is one of just eight players to record over 1,000 tackles and 10 sacks in their career. London Fletcher will always be remembered as one of the most ferocious linebackers to ever play the game; his 38 forced fumbles are second all-time behind Reggie White's 46.

Fletcher was a three-time Pro Bowler and two-time All-Pro. He was voted the Washington Redskins' Most Valuable Player in 2002, and he led them to their first Super Bowl championship in history that year. Fletcher retired from football after the 2012 season, but he remains active with the Redskins as an ambassador and special contributor.

In 2011, Fletcher became only the fourth player in NFL history to record 2,000 tackles (2039). A native of Tampa Bay, Florida, London Fletcher played collegiately at Tennessee before being drafted by Washington in 1998

14. Dave Butz

Defensive tackle

Career

  • 2× Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII)
  • First-team All-Pro (1983)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1984)
  • Pro Bowl (1983)
  • NFL 1980s All-Decade Team
  • 70 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Redskins Ring of Fame

Dave Butz was a defensive tackle who played in the NFL for over 20 years. He started his career with the St. Louis Cardinals, where he won two Super Bowls.

After spending time with the Washington Redskins, he joined the Chicago Bears and later went on to play for the Seattle Seahawks and Detroit Lions before retiring in 1988.

Dave Butz is one of only four players in history to win back-to-back Super Bowls (with Pittsburgh Steelers teammate Franco Harris). He died from complications after a stroke at age 72 in November 2022 Dave Butz was an All-American offensive lineman at the University of Wisconsin.

He was drafted in the first round by the Washington Redskins in 1979, and he spent his entire thirteen-year NFL career with them. He was a two-time Super Bowl champion (XXII and XXVI), as well as a Pro Bowler and Second Team All-Pro selection both years. In 2004, Butz became one of just four players in NFL history to be voted into both the College Football Hall of Fame and the Washington Redskins Ring of Fame simultaneously.

Dave Butz is currently retired from football after announcing his retirement in 2006 after playing his last game for Washington against Philadelphia Eagles Dave has since become known for being one half of The Morning Show on 106 & Park with Ryan Seacrest where they discuss pop culture items but also give their honest opinions about sports topics

15. Larry Brown

Running back

Larry Brown Career

  • NFL Most Valuable Player (1972)
  • Bert Bell Award (1972)
  • UPI NFC Player of the Year (1972)
  • NFL Offensive Player of the Year (1972)
  • 2× First-team All-Pro (1970, 1972)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1971)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (1969–1972)
  • NFL rushing yards leader (1970)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Larry Brown was a running back for the Washington Redskins from 1969-1976. He played in seven Pro Bowls and averaged over 1,000 yards from scrimmage every season he was with the team.

Brown is considered one of the greatest running backs to ever play in the NFL and his number 43 remains retired by both the Redskins and Kansas State University. In 2003, Brown was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of their class of 2002.

Larry currently resides in Clairton, Pennsylvania where he works as an ESPN commentator on college football matches Larry Brown was a Hall of Fame running back and head coach in the National Football League. He played for the Redskins from 1969 to 1972, winning two Pro Bowls and becoming the team's first-ever Offensive Player of the Year in 1972.

Brown then became head coach of the Browns from 1973 to 1978, leading them to four consecutive playoff appearances but no championships. In 1979 he took over as head coach of UCLA where he would stay until 1994, amassing an overall record of 274–154 (.671). After retiring from coaching, Brown served as president/CEO of Adidas International until his retirement in 2015 at age 80 years old

16. Santana Moss

Wide receiver

Santana Moss Career

  • Second-team All-Pro (2005)
  • Pro Bowl (2005)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Big East Offensive Player of the Year (2000)
  • Consensus All-American (2000)
  • First-team All-Big East (2000)

Moss was a wide receiver for the New York Jets from 2001-2004. He had a productive career with the team, recording over 1,000 receiving yards in 2002 and 2003 combined.

Moss also returned punts for the Jets during his time there, helping them to two playoff appearances. After leaving the NFL, Moss played in Europe for a few seasons before returning to America and joining the Baltimore Ravens as their punt returner in 2017.

In 2018 he joined the Oakland Raiders on a one-year contract extension after impressing head coach Jon Gruden with his performances thus far that season Santana Moss was a highly-touted wide receiver prospect out of the University of Maryland. He made an immediate impact in the NFL with Washington, catching 732 passes for 10,283 yards and 69 touchdowns during his seven seasons with the team.

In 2006, he led all receivers in receptions (115) and receiving yards (1,934), as well as touchdown catches (14). His 2007 campaign was cut short by injury but he still managed to post career highs in both categories - finishing with 116 receptions for 1,502 yards and six touchdowns. After being traded to Oakland midway through the 2009 season, Moss finished his career with 598 catches for 8127 yards and 51 scores over 83 games played.

A four-time Pro Bowler who earned first-team All-Pro honors five times (), Santana Moss is one of only six players in NFL history to amass more than 10,000 receiving yards and 50 touchdowns ().

17. Chris Samuels

Tackle

Chris Samuels Career

  • 6× Pro Bowl (2001, 2002, 2005–2008)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2000)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Unanimous All-American (1999)
  • First-team All-SEC (1999)
  • Outland Trophy (1999)

Chris Samuels was a key player for the Washington Redskins from 2000 to 2009, playing in 139 games and making 158 tackles. After retiring as a player, Chris Samuels became an assistant coach with the Tennessee Titans in 2010 and then moved on to become offensive line coach of the St.

Louis Rams from 2011 to 2014 before returning to Tennessee as associate head coach/offensive line in 2015. In 2018 he joined Alabama's coaching staff as tight ends coach and special teams coordinator under Nick Saban, after previously being his position group coordinator at LSU Chris Samuels is a former NFL offensive lineman who most recently served as an assistant offensive line coach for the Alabama Crimson Tide.

Before coaching, Chris spent 12 seasons in the NFL playing with the Washington Redskins and Baltimore Ravens. He was a five-time Pro Bowler and two-time first-team All-Pro selection, accounting for more than 1,000 total yards from scrimmage over his career. In addition to his on-field accomplishments, Chris also holds several prestigious awards including PFWA All-Rookie Team honors and induction into both the Washington Commanders Ring of Fame and the Alabama Sports Hall of Fame.

18. Doug Williams

Quarterback

Doug Williams Career

  • Jacksonville Jaguars (1995–1996)
  • College scout
  • Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2004–2008)
  • Personnel executive
  • Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2009–2010)
  • Coordinator of pro scouting
  • Virginia Destroyers (2010–2011)
  • General manager
  • Washington Redskins (2014–2016)
  • Personnel executive
  • Washington Redskins (2017–2019)
  • Senior vice president of player personnel
  • Washington Football Team (2020)
  • Senior vice president of player development
  • Washington Football Team / Commanders (2021–present)
  • Senior advisor

Doug Williams was a very successful player in the NFL. He played for Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Oakland Raiders, and Oklahoma/Arizona Outlaws. Doug Williams is known as one of the best wide receivers in NFL history.

He finished with over 1,500 yards and 12 touchdowns in his career. After retiring from playing football, Doug Williams became a senior advisor to the Washington Commanders team in 2022. Doug Williams played 13 seasons in the NFL as a quarterback for the Washington Redskins.

He led Washington to three Super Bowls, and was named MVP of two of them (Super Bowl XXII and Super Bowl XXVI). In 1987 he signed with the Philadelphia Eagles as a free agent, but only played one season for them before retiring. Williams has since been inducted into both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and College Football Hall of Fame.

19. Gary Clark

Gary Clark Career

  • 2× Super Bowl champion (XXII, XXVI)
  • First-team All-Pro (1987)
  • 2× Second-team All-Pro (1986, 1991)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (1986, 1987, 1990, 1991)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Gary Clark is a wide receiver who played for the Redskins and Cardinals from 1985-1992. He was drafted by Washington in 1984, and made an immediate impact with the team, becoming one of its most productive receivers during his time there.

Clark led the NFL in receptions twice (1988 and 1990), as well as receiving yards once (1990). After leaving the NFL in 1992, he spent two seasons playing with Phoenix / Arizona before retiring at age 33 due to injury. Gary Clark was one of the most explosive receivers in NFL history.

He led the league in touchdown receptions four times, and he was a dominant force on offense for the Miami Dolphins during their Super Bowl runs in 1987 and 1991. Clark also had sterling career stats: he caught at least 65 passes five times, averaged 15.5 yards per catch, and scored twice more than any other receiver in NFL history (a total of 85 touchdowns).

Gary Clark is one of only two players to win both an MVP award (in 1987) and a Super Bowl ring (in XXVI), cementing his status as one of the all-time greats at his position.

20. Chris Hanburger

Chris Hanburger Career

  • 5× First-team All-Pro
  • (1969, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1974)
  • 9× Pro Bowl (1966–1969, 1972–1976)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Chris Hanburger played linebacker for the Washington Redskins from 1965 to 1978. He was a part of four divisional championships and two Super Bowls during his career.

Hanburger was an All-Pro selection six times in his career, including twice as a unanimous choice. He also won three NFL Defensive Player of the Year Awards and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1984.

After retiring as a player, Hanburger worked as an analyst on ESPN's Monday Night Football broadcasts before passing away in February 2015 at age 81 after battling health issues for many years. Chris Hanburger was an all-pro linebacker in the NFL for nine seasons.

He was a part of five Redskins teams that made it to the playoffs, and they reached two Pro Bowls. After his retirement from football, he became a color commentator on Redskins games.

21. Clinton Portis

Running back

Clinton Portis Career

  • NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year (2002)
  • Second-team All-Pro (2008)
  • 2× Pro Bowl (2003, 2008)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2002)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • BCS national champion (2001)
  • First-team All-Big East (2001)

Clinton Portis was a running back for the Denver Broncos and Washington Redskins in the NFL. Clinton Portis is best known for his time with the Broncos, where he played from 2002 to 2003.

After leaving Denver, Portis signed with the Washington Redskins and spent four seasons there before being traded to the Baltimore Ravens in 2009. In 2010, Portis signed with the Indianapolis Colts but only lasted one season before being released by Indianapolis in 2011.

After spending some time out of football, Clinton re-signed with Baltimore and helped them win Super Bowl XLVII over San Francisco 49ers that year. Portis has also had stints playing for the Houston Texans (2012), Atlanta Falcons (2013) and Tennessee Titans (2015). Clinton retired from professional football after appearing in just three games during 2017 due to injury.
8 .

He began coaching high school football as an assistant coach at Gainesville High School in Florida in 2018 Clinton Portis was a standout running back for the Washington Redskins from 2002-2008. He was named NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year in 2002 and twice made it to the Pro Bowl, including his final season with the team in 2008. Clinton Portis played college football at Ohio State University before being drafted by the Redskins in 2002.

He led all rookie running backs in rushing yards and touchdowns that year, helping Washington make it to their first-ever Super Bowl appearance. After spending four seasons with Washington, Portis signed with Denver Broncos as a free agent in 2006 but struggled there before being traded to Cleveland Browns two years later. In 2010 he joined Baltimore Ravens where he finished out his career after one more season with them in 2011. Clinton Portis is now an analyst for ESPN's Monday Night Football coverage and has released multiple music albums since retiring from footballing activities several years ago

22. Champ Bailey

Defensive back

Champ Bailey Career

  • 3× First-team All-Pro (2004–2006)
  • 4× Second-team All-Pro (2000, 2003, 2007, 2012)
  • 12× Pro Bowl (2000–2007, 2009–2012)
  • NFL interceptions leader (2006)
  • NFL 2000s All-Decade Team
  • NFL All-Rookie Team (1999)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Denver Broncos 50th Anniversary Team
  • Denver Broncos Ring of Fame (2019)
  • Bronko Nagurski Trophy (1998)
  • Consensus All-American (1998)

Bailey was drafted seventh overall by the Washington Redskins in 1999. Bailey played for the Broncos from 2004 to 2013 and is considered one of the greatest cornerbacks of all time.

In 2014, Bailey signed with the New Orleans Saints and had a successful season recording nine interceptions. Champ Bailey was a four-time first-team All-Pro and 12-time Pro Bowler during his 16 seasons in the NFL.

Bailey led the league in interceptions twice, including 2006 when he had 13 picks. He also made an appearance in seven Pro Bowls and was named to the All-Decade Team for the 2000s. In 2018, Champ Bailey was inducted into the Broncos Ring of Fame alongside other great players from that era like Terrell Davis and John Elway.

23. Charley Taylor

Charley Taylor Career

  • 3× Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI)
  • First-team All-Pro (1967)
  • 5× Second-team All-Pro (1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1974)
  • 8× Pro Bowl (1964–1967, 1972–1975)
  • NFL Rookie of the Year (1964)
  • 2× NFL receptions leader (1966, 1967)
  • NFL 1960s All-Decade Team
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Charley Taylor was a prolific wide receiver and halfback in the NFL, AFL and XFL. He played for Arizona State before being drafted by the Baltimore Colts in 1964.

After six seasons with Baltimore, he signed with the New York Jets in 1971 where he spent 14 years playing until his retirement in 1988. Charley also represented Team USA at three World Cups (1974, 1978 and 1982) and two Olympics (1976 and 1980).

He died aged 80 after a long battle with cancer Taylor played wide receiver for the Washington Redskins from 1964 to 1975. He was a three-time Super Bowl champion and first-team All-Pro in 1967. Taylor also led the NFL in receptions twice, and he was voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1984.

24. Russ Grimm

Russ Grimm Career

  • Washington Redskins (TE, 1992–1996)
  • Washington Redskins (OL, 1997–2000)
  • Pittsburgh Steelers (OL, 2001–2006)
  • Arizona Cardinals (OL, 2007–2012)
  • Tennessee Titans (OL, 2016–2017)

Russ Grimm was a guard for the Washington Redskins from 1981 to 1991. After leaving the NFL, Grimm became an assistant coach with the team before being promoted to head coach in 1996.

He led Washington to two playoff appearances and one division title during his tenure as head coach but resigned after the 1999 season due to differences with owner Dan Snyder. Grimm later served as defensive line coach for the Pittsburgh Steelers from 2002 until his retirement in 2013.

Russ Grimm is currently a color commentator for ESPN's Monday Night Football broadcasts and also serves as an analyst on select CBS Sports Network programming... Russ Grimm was a dominant left tackle in the NFL for many years. He helped lead the Washington Redskins to three Super Bowl titles, and he was also named a First-team All-Pro four times.

Grimm then went on to coach the Arizona Cardinals to an NFC Championship victory in his first season as head coach. Russ Grimm retired from football following the 2017 season, but he will always be remembered for his incredible playing career and coaching achievements.

25. Sam Huff

Sam Huff Career

  • NFL champion (1956)
  • 2× First-team All-Pro (1958, 1959)
  • 4× Second-team All-Pro (1957, 1960, 1961, 1963)
  • 5× Pro Bowl (1958–1961, 1964)
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • New York Giants Ring of Honor
  • First-team All-American (1955)
  • West Virginia Mountaineers No. 75 retired

Sam Huff was a linebacker for the New York Giants and Washington Redskins in the NFL. He played until 1963 with the Giants, and from 1964 to 1967 with the Redskins.

Sam Huff was born on October 4, 1934 in Edna, West Virginia. During his time in college at West Virginia, Huff had a stellar career as an athlete and helped lead his team to a National Championship victory in 1955.

In 1956, Sam Huff was drafted by the New York Giants in the third round of the NFL Draft and went on to play for them until 1963. He then moved onto Washington where he spent another four seasons before retiring due to injury after playing one final season in 1967 with Washington.

After retirement from football, Sam Huff enjoyed a successful coaching career which included stints as head coach of both Rutgers University (1973–1975) and Hampton University (1976). He passed away on November 13th 2021 at age 87 after long suffering from Parkinson's Disease Sam Huff was one of the most dominant defensive players in NFL history.

He played for 14 seasons and won multiple awards, including two First-team All-Pro selections and four Second-team All-Pros. Known as "The Assassin," Huff racked up 30 career interceptions, five touchdowns, and 17 fumble recoveries - impressive numbers for a defender of his era. Huff is perhaps best known for his time with the Washington Redskins during their championship years in the early 1960s.

At 34 years old, he helped lead Washington to back-to-back titles en route to being named an inaugural member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1984. After hanging up his cleats following the 1965 season, Sam Huff retired with more than 18,000 total yards (155 receptions) and 105 tackles from 143 games played in his illustrious NFL career

26. Ryan Kerrigan

Linebacker

Ryan Kerrigan Career

  • 4× Pro Bowl (2012, 2016–2018)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2011)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Bill Willis Trophy (2010)
  • Nagurski–Woodson Defensive Player of the Year (2010)
  • Smith–Brown Defensive Lineman of the Year (2010)
  • Unanimous All-American (2010)
  • First-team All-Big Ten (2010)

Kerrigan is a former NFL player who most notably played with the Washington Redskins. Kerrigan is currently an assistant defensive line coach with the team.

Kerrigan was born in 1988 and attended high school in Muncie, Indiana. After playing college football at Purdue, Kerrigan was drafted by the Washington Redskins in 2011 and spent five seasons with them before moving to Philadelphia in 2021.

Kerrigan has made multiple appearances on TV shows such as "Hard Knocks" and "Thursday Night Football". Ryan Kerrigan is a defensive end for the Washington Redskins of the National Football League. He was drafted by the Redskins in the first round (10th overall) of the 2006 NFL Draft and has played for them since then.

In 2018, he led all NFL players with 16 sacks, earning him his third Pro Bowl selection and first All-Pro award. Kerrigan also registered 66 tackles (second on team), five forced fumbles, two fumble recoveries and one interception during that season while helping lead Washington to an NFC East title game appearance as well as their fourth playoff berth in six years.

Additionally, he has been selected twice as First Team All-Big Ten Conference performer at Ohio State University where he played from 2002–2006 before being drafted into the NFL by Washington Dc...

27. Jerry Smith

Career

  • First-team All-Pro (1969)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1967)
  • 2× Pro Bowl (1967, 1969)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Jerry Smith was born on July 19, 1943 in Eugene, Oregon. He played college football at Arizona State and was drafted by the Chiefs in 1965. Smith spent his entire career with the Chiefs and died of a heart attack in 1986 at 43 years old.

Jerry Smith was the first African American to play in an NFL game. He played for the Washington Redskins from 1965-1977. Jerry Smith is a two time Pro Bowler and one time All-Pro selection. Jerry Smith is also a member of the Washington Commanders Ring of Fame and 80 Greatest Redskins list, both honors given to him by his home state of Maryland

28. Ken Houston

Career

  • 2× First-team All-Pro (1975, 1978)
  • 10× Second-team All-Pro (1968–1974, 1976, 1977, 1979)
  • 12× Pro Bowl (1968–1979)
  • NFL 75th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • NFL 100th Anniversary All-Time Team
  • First-team NFL 1970s All-Decade Team
  • Titans/Oilers Ring of Honor
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Texas Sports Hall of Fame

Ken Houston was a safety for the Oilers and Redskins in his 10-year NFL career. He was twice named First-team All-Pro, and he helped lead Washington to two Super Bowl titles in 1978 and 1981.

Houston is best known for his play against Jerry Rice in the 1981 NFC Championship Game, which led to a 42–10 defeat of the San Francisco 49ers. After retiring from football, Houston worked as an analyst on ESPN's Monday Night Football coverage for several years before becoming a television commentator and coach.

Ken Houston was a standout cornerback in the NFL for over 20 years and is considered one of the best to ever play the game. He played for six different teams, including two stints with the Titans/Oilers, and was a 12-time Pro Bowler. His most notable season came in 1971 when he returned four interceptions for touchdowns (tied with Jim Kearney and Eric Allen).

After retiring from football, Houston went on to have a successful career as a coach and executive with several organizations.

29. Logan Thomas

Tight end

Logan Thomas Career

  • Arizona Cardinals (2014)
  • Miami Dolphins (2015)
  • New York Giants (2016)*
  • Detroit Lions (2016)*
  • Buffalo Bills (2016–2018)
  • Detroit Lions (2019)
  • Washington Football Team / Commanders (2020–present)

Thomas was drafted by the Arizona Cardinals in 2014, but never played for them. He signed with the Miami Dolphins in 2015 and played there until 2016. Thomas is a tight end who has played for three teams over his four-year NFL career: the Arizona Cardinals, Miami Dolphins, and New York Giants.

Thomas' main attribute as a player is his speed; he's been clocked at around 4.5 seconds in the 40-yard dash (which puts him among the fastest players in the league). Injuries have been an issue for Thomas throughout his career - he missed time during both of his seasons with the Giants due to injury - and it's possible that this will be another factor that affects his chances of making it into the Pro Football Hall of Fame one day Logan Thomas was a two-time All-ACC selection at quarterback for the Virginia Tech Hokies.

He entered the NFL draft in 2016 and was selected by the Detroit Lions in the fourth round. Thomas started his career with 14 starts over three seasons with Detroit, but he eventually lost his starting job to rookie Matthew Stafford and spent time on injured reserve and on the team's practice squad. In 2019, Thomas signed with Buffalo Bills as their third-string quarterback behind Josh Allen and Nathan Peterman. The Bills released Thomas before the 2020 season started and he has since been re-signed by Washington Football Team / Commanders as their backup QB behind Alex Smith

30. Charles Mann

Charles Mann Career

  • 3× Super Bowl champion (XXII, XXVI, XXIX)
  • 2× Second-team All-Pro (1987, 1991)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (1987–1989, 1991)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Nevada Athletics Hall of Fame [1]

Charles Mann is a defensive end who played for the Washington Redskins and San Francisco 49ers in the NFL. He was drafted by the Redskins in 1983 and spent his entire career with them, playing parts of 13 seasons.

He appeared in four Pro Bowls during his time with Washington and helped lead them to two Super Bowl victories (1983, 1991). After leaving the Redskins, Mann signed with the 49ers but only managed one year before retiring from football at the age of 34 due to injuries sustained on the field.

Charles Mann currently works as a sports analyst for ESPN and has written several books about American football including "The Big Short" which became a major motion picture released in 2017. Charles Mann is a three-time Super Bowl champion and two-time Second Team All Pro linebacker for the Washington Redskins.

Charles Mann was inducted into both the Washington Commanders Ring of Fame and Nevada Athletics Hall of Fame for his accomplishments on the field. Charles Mann retired from football in 1999 after playing 17 seasons in the NFL, including 14 with the Redskins where he had over 200 tackles, 16 sacks, 6 interceptions, 3 fumble recoveries and 2 touchdowns.

31. Montez Sweat

Linebacker

Montez Sweat Career

  • Michigan State (2014–2015)
  • Co–Lin (2016)
  • Mississippi State (2017–2018)

Montez Sweat was born on September 4, 1996 in Richmond, Kentucky. He attended Stephenson High School where he played football and basketball. As a senior in high school, Montez Sweat recorded 87 tackles and 14 sacks.

Montez Sweat played college football at Michigan State from 2014 to 2015 before transferring to Co–Lin College for the 2016 season. In 2017 and 2018, Montez Sweat spent time with Mississippi State as a redshirt junior and sophomore respectively before being drafted by the Washington Commanders in 2019 as their 26th overall player of the draft.

Montez Sweat was a highly touted recruit coming out of high school and decided to attend Florida State. He had an impressive freshman season, recording 10 tackles for loss with 3 sacks. In his sophomore year, Sweat continued to rack up the stats, totaling 17 TFLs, 13 sacks, and 4 forced fumbles in only 12 games played. As a junior in 2018, Montez Sweat finally got some recognition from the NFL Draft community when he was picked by the New York Giants in the fifth round (158th overall).

After being waived by the Giants on September 2nd of that year, Montez Sweat signed with Washington less than two weeks later on September 16th. With Washington's starting defensive end Jonathan Allen sidelined due to injury early in training camp and no other viable candidates at DE beside Trent Murphy (who is also injured), MontezSweat has been given more opportunities to start this season as opposed to playing mostly off-the-bench like he did last year..

32. Chris Cooley

Tight end

Chris Cooley Career

  • 2× Pro Bowl (2007, 2008)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2004)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Utah State University Athletics Hall of Fame
  • First-team All-Sun Belt (2003)

Chris Cooley began his NFL career with the Washington Redskins in 2004. He played for the team until 2012, totaling 415 receptions for 5,836 yards and 36 touchdowns.

Chris Cooley is well-known for being a reliable tight end in the NFL. He has averaged more than 60 receptions per season over his career and has also scored multiple times.

In 2013, Chris Cooley signed with the Baltimore Ravens on a one-year deal worth $1 million dollars. He was released by the Ravens after just one game of the season though, due to injuries sustained while playing against Cleveland Browns Chris Cooley is a three-time Pro Bowler and two-time first-team All-Sun Belt player.

He has also been named to the Washington Commanders 90 Greatest list, Utah State University Athletics Hall of Fame and was inducted into their hall of fame in 2016. Chris Cooley began his NFL career with the Redskins in 2004 and played for them until 2007 before joining the Eagles where he spent six seasons (2009–15). In 2017, Chris Cooley returned to play for his original team – the Redskins – signing a one year deal worth $1 million dollars

33. Monte Coleman

Career

  • Arkansas–Pine Bluff (2003–2005; LB)
  • Arkansas–Pine Bluff (2006–2007; DC)
  • Arkansas–Pine Bluff (2008–2017; HC)

Monte Coleman was a linebacker for the Washington Redskins from 1979 to 1994. He played college football at Central Arkansas and helped lead the team to two bowl games, in 1978 and 1981.

In 1989, he won a Super Bowl with the Redskins. Coleman also coached at Arkansas–Pine Bluff for eight seasons, most recently as head coach from 2008 to 2017. He is currently retired but still involved in charity work on behalf of children and veterans through his organization "Monte's Dream Foundation." Monte Coleman was one of the most dominant defensive tackles in NFL history.

He won three Super Bowls as a player with the Washington Redskins and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1993. After retiring from playing, Coleman became an assistant coach for the Redskins before being named head coach of Southwestern Athletic Conference champion Tulsa in 2012. His career record as a head coach is 40-71 (.360), but he has shown some promise with his teams since taking over several years ago.

34. Landon Collins

Safety

Landon Collins Career

  • First-team All-Pro (2016)
  • 3× Pro Bowl (2016–2018)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2015)
  • BCS national champion (2013)
  • Unanimous All-American (2014)
  • First-team All-SEC (2014)

Landon Collins is a safety and linebacker for the New York Giants. He was born in 1994 in Louisiana and played college football at Alabama. Collins was drafted by the Washington Redskins in 2015, but did not play with them until 2019 when he joined the Giants.

In 2021, Collins signed with the New York Giants and has since remained there as of 2018. Landon Collins is one of the most decorated players in college football history. He was a unanimous first-team All-American and led Alabama to their fourth BCS national championship in 2013.

Collins was drafted by the New York Giants with the sixth overall pick in the 2014 NFL draft, and he has been an integral part of their defense ever since. He has made six Pro Bowls and won three Super Bowls with them as well. Collins is known for his aggressive play on defense, which has resulted in him accumulating over 600 tackles, 41 sacks, 12 interceptions, 7 forced fumbles, 5 fumble recoveries and 2 touchdowns throughout his career so far.

35. Joe Jacoby

Joe Jacoby Career

  • 3× Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI)
  • 3× First-team All-Pro (1983, 1984, 1987)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (1983–1986)
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (1981)
  • NFL 1980s All-Decade Team
  • Washington Redskins Ring of Fame
  • Louisville Cardinals Ring of Honor

Joe Jacoby was a 6'7" left tackle for the Washington Redskins from 1981 to 1993. He started all 112 games he played in and helped lead the team to four Super Bowl appearances, winning one (1988).

Joe Jacoby was born in Louisville, Kentucky on July 6th, 1959. After high school graduation, he attended Western Kentucky University where he played football and majored in business administration.

In 1981, Joe Jacoby was drafted by the Washington Redskins as an undrafted free agent and spent six seasons with them before signing with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1992. He retired after playing three seasons with Philadelphia and finished his career with 14 sacks and five fumble recoveries.

Joe Jacoby is currently involved in several businesses including coaching youth football at Fairfax Christian School and being a color commentator for college bowl games on ESPNU TV channel.. Joe Jacoby was one of the most successful offensive linemen in NFL history. He won three Super Bowls and was First-team All-Pro four times.

Joe Jacoby also had a long career with the Washington Redskins, where he became a Ring of Fame member in 2010. After retiring from football, Joe Jacoby started his own business which helps injured athletes heal faster and better.

36. Mark May

Tackle

Mark May Career

  • 2× Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII)
  • Pro Bowl (1988)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Outland Trophy (1980)
  • Unanimous All-American (1980)
  • Pittsburgh Panthers No. 73 retired

Mark May was a prolific guard in the NFL. He played for three teams over 13 seasons, and won two Super Bowls with the Washington Redskins. May is best known for his stellar play on special teams, where he became one of the most reliable players in league history.

He also made an impact as a starter from time to time, but is more widely remembered for his role on defense. In 2001, Mark May was named to the Pro Football Hall of Fame after receiving nearly unanimous votes from members of the Professional Football Writers Association (PFWA).

After retiring from football following the 1993 season, Mark May moved into coaching and has been working with various levels of athletes ever since. Today he resides in Arizona and continues to work with young athletes eager to achieve their goals both on and off the field. Mark May is a former NFL player who played for the Washington Redskins from 1980-1988.

He was one of the best players in the league during that time and won two Super Bowls with the team. After his playing career, he became an ESPN analyst and has been very successful in that role. In 2006, he was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as part of their class of 2006. As a person, Mark May is known as someone who is always willing to help others and gives back to his community regularly through various charities and events.

Overall, Mark May is clearly one of professional football's most successful players ever and will be greatly missed by all those who have had the pleasure of knowing him

37. Stephen Davis

Fullback

Career

  • First-team All-Pro (1999)
  • 3× Pro Bowl (1999, 2000, 2003)
  • NFL rushing touchdowns leader (1999)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest

Davis was drafted by the Washington Redskins in 1996 and played for them until 2002. He then signed with the Carolina Panthers, where he remained for three years before moving on to St.

Louis Rams in 2006. Davis retired from professional football after playing one season with the San Francisco 49ers in 2007. In total, Davis played in 115 games over nine seasons and accumulated 1,309 rushing yards (5th all-time) and 12 touchdowns (tied for 3rd).

Following his retirement, Davis became a color commentator for NFL broadcasts alongside play-by-play man Jim Nantz Davis was an All-Pro running back for the Washington Redskins and led the NFL in rushing touchdowns in 1999. He also played for three years in the Pro Bowl, and is a member of the Washington Commanders 90 Greatest list.

Davis retired after the 2004 season and now works as an analyst on Fox Sports 1's "NFL Live".

38. Jeff Bostic

Jeff Bostic Career

  • 3× Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI)
  • Pro Bowl (1983)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Jeff Bostic was a dominant center in the NFL for nearly 20 years, playing for the Washington Redskins and Baltimore Ravens. He is best known for his time with the Redskins, where he helped lead them to three Super Bowl appearances (1987, 1991, 1993).

Bostic also played on two NFC Championship teams (1991 and 1992) with the Ravens. After retiring from football in 1994, Bostics went into coaching; he has been an assistant coach at various colleges since then. Jeff Bostic was inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame in 2013 after being unanimously voted into induction by the league's coaches and players association.

Jeff Bostic was a 3x Super Bowl champion and Pro Bowler with the Washington Redskins. He is also a member of the Washington Commanders Ring of Fame and 80 Greatest Redskins list. Jeff retired from football in 2003 after playing for 14 seasons with the Redskins and Detroit Lions. Currently, he is an analyst for Fox Sports 1's National Football League coverage

39. Mike Bass

Defensive back

Career

  • Second-team All-Pro (1974)
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame (2022)
  • 90 Greatest Commanders

Bass was a cornerback for the Detroit Lions from 1967 to 1975. He played in 129 games and had 9 interceptions. Bass also played for the Washington Redskins from 1969 to 1975 and had 3 interceptions during that time span.

Bass is now 77 years old and resides in Ypsilanti, Michigan with his wife of 53 years, Barbara Lynn Bass. Bass was one of the most versatile players in NFL history, playing both defensive back and receiver. He was a two-time Second-team All-Pro and four time Pro Bowler.

Bass also won a Washington Commanders Ring of Fame award in 2022. His career totals include 100 games played, 30 interceptions, 6 fumble recoveries and 4 touchdowns.

40. Daron Payne

Defensive lineman

Daron Payne Career

  • CFP national champion (2017)
  • CFP National Championship Defensive MVP (2018)
  • 2018 Sugar Bowl Defensive MVP
  • PFWA All-Rookie Team (2018)
  • First-team All-SEC Team (2017)
  • Freshman All-American (2015)

Payne was born in Birmingham, Alabama and attended Shades Valley High School. Payne played college football at the University of Alabama where he won a National Championship in 2017.

After being drafted by the Washington Redskins in 2018, Payne has made an immediate impact on their defense. In 2019, he was named to his first Pro Bowl and became only the 10th player in NFL history to record 25 sacks and five forced fumbles over two seasons consecutively.

Daron Payne was a unanimous first-team All-American as a defensive lineman for the Auburn Tigers in 2018. He was also named SEC Defensive Player of the Year, and helped lead his team to an appearance in the Sugar Bowl that year. Payne has had success at both college and professional level, with 289 tackles (including 26 sacks) and 14 interceptions over four seasons so far in the NFL.

Despite being relatively new to football, he quickly became one of its best players due to his athleticism and discipline on defense; he is expected to be a key part of the Atlanta Falcons' future plans

41. Len Hauss

Career

  • 2× Second-team All-Pro (1974, 1975)
  • 5× Pro Bowl (1966, 1968–1970, 1972)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Georgia Sports Hall of Fame (1981)

Len Hauss was a center for the Washington Redskins during the late 1960s and early 1970s. He was selected in the ninth round of the 1964 NFL Draft and spent six seasons with the team.

After retiring from football, he began coaching at his alma mater, Georgia, where he served as offensive coordinator from 1978 to 1981 and head coach from 1982 to 1991. He retired from coaching following the 1991 season and later died at 79 years old after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease.

Len Hauss was a prolific receiver in the NFL for over 20 years. He played with the Redskins from 1966 to 1975 and won 2x Second-team All-Pro honors. In 1970, he became one of only 4 players in league history to catch 100 passes and return 5 fumbles for touchdowns. After retiring as a player, Len went on to have a successful career as an executive with the team that drafted him - Washington Redskins - serving as President from 1989 until his retirement in 2001.

He is also a member of both the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame and Washington Commanders Ring of Fame and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2003

42. Sonny Jurgensen

Quarterback

Sonny Jurgensen Career

  • High school: New Hanover (Wilmington)
  • College: Duke (1954–1956)
  • NFL Draft: 1957 / Round: 4 / Pick: 43
  • Philadelphia Eagles (1957–1963), Washington Redskins (1964–1974)
  • NFL champion (1960), First-team All-Pro (1961), 3× Second-team All-Pro (1966, 1967, 1969), 5× Pro Bowl (1961, 1964, 1966, 1967, 1969), 5× NFL passing yards leader (1961, 1962, 1966, 1967, 1969), 2× NFL passing touchdowns leader (1961, 1967), NFL passer rating leader (1967), NFL completion percentage leader (1970), NFL 1960s All-Decade Team, Philadelphia Eagles Hall of Fame, Washington Commanders Ring of Fame, Washington Commanders No. 9 retired, NFL record, 99-yard pass play (tied)
  • Pass attempts: 4,262, Pass completions: 2,433, Completion percentage: 57.1, TD–INT: 255–189, Passing yards: 32,224, Passer rating: 82.6
  • Pass attempts: 4,262
  • Pass completions: 2,433
  • Completion percentage: 57.1
  • TD–INT: 255–189
  • Passing yards: 32,224
  • Passer rating: 82.6
  • Pro Football Hall of Fame

Sonny Jurgensen was one of the most decorated quarterbacks in NFL history. He won four Super Bowls and is seventh all-time in career passing yards (47,837).

Jurgensen also had a successful career with the Washington Redskins and Philadelphia Eagles. In his 13 seasons with the Eagles, he led them to six NFC Championship Games and three Super Bowl appearances, including victories over Pittsburgh in 1975 and Dallas in 1976.

After finishing his playing days, Jurgensen served as an analyst for NFL games on ABC from 1983 to 1994 before retiring completely at the end of that season. Sonny Jurgensen was a Hall of Fame quarterback who is best known for his time with the Philadelphia Eagles. He led his team to two NFL championships and five Pro Bowl appearances during the 1960s.

Sonny Jurgensen also holds several passing records, including most career attempts (4,262) and completions (2,433). In 1967 he became the first player in NFL history to lead the league in both passing yards and passer rating. After retiring from playing football, Sonny Jurgensen served as general manager of the Washington Redskins until 1983. He was inducted into both the Eagles and Redskins Halls of Fame in 1985 and 1998, respectively.

Sonny Jurgenson passed away at age 78 on January 2nd, 2017 after a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease

43. Ryan Fitzpatrick

Quarterback

Ryan Fitzpatrick Career

  • St. Louis Rams (2005–2006)
  • Cincinnati Bengals (2007–2008)
  • Buffalo Bills (2009–2012)
  • Tennessee Titans (2013)
  • Houston Texans (2014)
  • New York Jets (2015–2016)
  • Tampa Bay Buccaneers (2017–2018)
  • Miami Dolphins (2019–2020)
  • Washington Football Team (2021)

Fitzpatrick was drafted in the seventh round by the St. Louis Rams in 2005 and played for them for two seasons before moving on to Cincinnati. Fitzpatrick had a very successful career with the Bills, Titans, Jets, and Texans before signing with Miami this offseason.

As one of the most experienced quarterbacks in the league, Fitzpatrick is expected to be a big part of Miami’s offense next season. Fitzpatrick started his NFL career with the New York Jets in 2009. In 2018, Fitzpatrick signed with the Washington Redskins and finished out the season there.

Ryan is a three-time Ivy League Champion and was named Player of the Year at Yale in 2004. His 223 touchdowns are second most all time behind only Dan Marino's 248 touchdown passes during his career with Miami Dolphins (1984-89). Fitzpatrick led both teams he played for to playoff appearances in 2010 as a member of the Jets, and again in 2017 when he helped lead Tennessee to their first postseason appearance since 2007..

44. Paul Krause

Paul Krause Career

  • 3× First-team All-Pro (1964, 1965, 1975)
  • 4× Second-team All-Pro (1968, 1969, 1971, 1972)
  • 8× Pro Bowl (1964, 1965, 1969, 1971–1975)
  • NFL interceptions leader (1964)
  • Minnesota Vikings Ring of Honor
  • 50 Greatest Vikings
  • Minnesota Vikings 25th Anniversary Team
  • Minnesota Vikings 40th Anniversary Team
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest

Krause was a safety for several NFL teams throughout his career. He was drafted by the Washington Redskins in 1964 and played for them from 1964 to 1967.

Krause then played for the Minnesota Vikings from 1968 to 1979. He won two Super Bowls with the Vikings, in 1969 and 1974, as well as four other championships during his time in the league.

In 1980, Krause retired after playing 14 seasons of professional football and later served as an assistant coach with both the Redskins and Vikings organizations. Paul Krause was one of the greatest defensive backs in NFL history and is a member of both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and Minnesota Vikings Ring of Honor.

He was an eight-time Pro Bowler, four-time Second Team All-Pro, and led the league in interceptions twice during his career. Krause also holds several Vikings team records including most interception returns for touchdowns (5) and total yards from intercepted passes (1,185). In 1996, he was elected to the NFL's 50 Greatest Players list at age 43 making him one of only two players ever to be voted into both the Pro Football Hall of Fame and NFL's all-century team simultaneously.

45. Kamren Curl

Kamren Curl Career

  • Washington Football Team / Commanders (2020–present)

Kamren Curl is a strong safety for the Washington Football Team in 2021. Kamren Curl was born on March 31, 1999 in San Diego, California. At age 23, Curl is 6' 2" and 198 pounds.

In college, he played for Arkansas from 2017-2019 where he won two SEC titles and made three All-American teams as a defensive back. He was drafted by the Washington Commanders in 2020 with the seventh overall pick and has since started all 16 games for them at strong safety so far this season (2021).

Kamren Curl is a young linebacker with plenty of potential. He started the season strong, but has cooled off since then. Kamren Curl could use some improvement in pass coverage, and needs to stay healthy if he wants to make an impact on Sundays.

46. Antonio Gibson

Running back

Antonio Gibson Career

  • AAC Co-Special Teams Player of the Year (2019)
  • First-team All-AAC (2019, return specialist)
  • Second-team All-AAC (2019, wide receiver)

Antonio Gibson is a running back with the Washington Football Team in 2020. Gibson attended East Central University where he played football for two seasons.

He was drafted by the Washington Football Team in the third round of the 2020 NFL Draft and has since appeared in four games. Antonio Gibson is originally from Stockbridge, Georgia and currently resides in McDonough, Georgia.

Antonio Gibson was one of the most productive players in the AAC this season. He finished second on the team with 124 receptions and fifth with 5 touchdowns. Gibson also averaged over 4 yards per carry, and racked up 2,378 rushing yards on just 97 attempts.

The 21 rushing touchdowns were a career high for Gibson, who is currently injured reserve with an ankle injury sustained late in the year. Antonio Gibson has been very consistent throughout his college career, which may help him stand out during his NFL audition later this year

47. Eddie LeBaron

Eddie LeBaron Career

  • NFL Rookie of the Year (1952)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (1955, 1957, 1958, 1962)
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Second-team All-American (1949)
  • 3× First-team Little All-American (1947–1949)
  • Pacific Tigers #40 retired [1]

Eddie LeBaron was born on January 7, 1930 in San Rafael, California. He played quarterback for the Washington Redskins from 1950-1953 and set several NFL records during that time period.

LeBaron died on April 1, 2015 at the age of 85 after a long illness. Eddie LeBaron was an all-around performer in the NFL. He started at quarterback for four different teams, passing for over 10,000 yards and scoring 103 touchdowns to 141 interceptions.

LeBaron played college football at Pacific University and was a two-time First Team All American (1947–1949). LeBaron signed with the Stampeders in 1954 and spent nine seasons as their starter before moving on to the Redskins in 1959. In 1963, he joined the Cowboys where he finished his career after one season due to injury.

After retirement from football, LeBaron worked as a sportscaster for WUSA TV until his death in 2004 at age 70

48. Mark Rypien

Mark Rypien Career

  • High school: Shadle Park (Spokane, Washington)
  • College: Washington State
  • NFL Draft: 1986 / Round: 6 / Pick: 146
  • Washington Redskins (1986–1993), Cleveland Browns (1994), St. Louis Rams (1995), Philadelphia Eagles (1996), St. Louis Rams (1997), Atlanta Falcons (1998)*, Indianapolis Colts (2001), Seattle Seahawks (2002)*, Rochester Raiders (2006)
  •  * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
  • 2× Super Bowl champion (XXII, XXVI), Super Bowl MVP (XXVI), Second-team All-Pro (1991), 2× Pro Bowl (1989, 1991), Washington Redskins 90 Greatest
  • Pass attempts: 2,613, Pass completions: 1,466, Percentage: 56.1, TD–INT: 115–88, Passing Yards: 18,473, QB Rating: 78.9
  • Pass attempts: 2,613
  • Pass completions: 1,466
  • Percentage: 56.1
  • TD–INT: 115–88
  • Passing Yards: 18,473
  • QB Rating: 78.9

Mark Rypien started his NFL career with the Washington Redskins in 1986. He was a backup quarterback for three seasons before becoming starter in 1991. In 1993, he was traded to the Cleveland Browns and played there until 1994.

In 1995, he signed with the St. Louis Rams and remained there until 1996 when he was traded to Philadelphia Eagles. After two years with the Eagles, Rypien joined the Seattle Seahawks in 1998 but didn't play any games due to injury .

Finally retired from professional football after playing one season for Arizona Cardinals in 2002 . Mark currently works as an analyst for ESPN's Monday Night Football coverage Mark Rypien started his professional football career with the St.

Louis Rams in 1997 and went on to win two Super Bowls with the team. Mark also played for Atlanta Falcons, Indianapolis Colts, and Seattle Seahawks during his illustrious NFL career. The Rochester Raiders added him as a free agent in 2006 and he led them to a playoff berth before retiring from professional football at the end of that season.

49. Cliff Battles

Cliff Battles Career

  • NFL champion (1937)
  • 3× First-team All-Pro (1933, 1934, 1936)
  • Second-team All-Pro (1937)
  • 2× NFL rushing yards leader (1932, 1937)
  • NFL rushing touchdowns co-leader (1937)
  • NFL 1930s All-Decade Team
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame

Cliff Battles was a halfback who played for the Boston Braves, Washington Redskins and finally the Washington Cardinals in his career. He spent most of his playing days with the Boston Braves (1932–37) before moving to D.C..

Cliff Battles also coached in the NFL for several years after retiring from playing football. Cliff Battles passed away on April 28th 1981 at the age of 70 after a long and successful football career Cliff Battles was an assistant coach for the Columbia Lions and Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1940s.

He then became a Marine officer during World War II, where he attained the rank of captain. After returning to civilian life, Battles joined the Redskins coaching staff in 1946 and remained with them until 1947. In 1948, he took over as head coach of El Toro Marines (a military team) before rejoining the Redskins as assistant coach under George Allen in 1949-50 seasons.

From 1951-53, he served again as head coach of El Toro Marines before joining Washington’s front office as director of player personnel from 1954-55 through 1959-60 seasons. Finally, after 14 years out of football coaching altogether, Cliff Battles returned to serve as offensive coordinator for two games for the Miami Dolphins in 1965 season .

50. Bobby Mitchell

Bobby Mitchell Career

  • 3× First-team All-Pro (1962–1964)
  • 2× Second-team All-Pro (1959, 1960)
  • 4× Pro Bowl (1960, 1962–1964)
  • NFL receptions leader (1962)
  • 2× NFL receiving yards leader (1962, 1963)
  • NFL receiving touchdowns co-leader (1964)
  • Washington Commanders No. 49 retired
  • 80 Greatest Redskins
  • Washington Commanders Ring of Fame
  • Cleveland Browns Ring of Honor

Bobby Mitchell was a halfback and wide receiver in the NFL for over 20 years. He played for the Cleveland Browns (1958-1961) and Washington Redskins (1962-1968).

After his playing career, he served as an executive with both teams, most notably with the Browns where he spent 14 seasons as general manager. In 1984, Bobby Mitchell became the first African American to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Mitchell was a three-time first-team All-Pro and four time Pro Bowler who led the NFL in receptions twice. He is also tied for the longest receiving touchdown of 99 yards, with another player. Mitchell retired after the 1972 season with 1,495 career receptions for 21,968 yards and 177 touchdowns.

51. Trent Williams

Tackle

Trent Williams Career

  • First-team All-Pro (2021)
  • Second-team All-Pro (2015)
  • 10× Pro Bowl (2012–2018, 2020−2022)
  • Washington Commanders 90 Greatest
  • Unanimous All-American (2009)
  • 2× first-team All-Big 12 (2008, 2009)

Trent Williams is a 34-year old offensive tackle who was drafted by the Washington Redskins in the 2010 NFL Draft. He has spent his entire career with the Redskins, playing for them from 2010 to 2019 before moving on to the San Francisco 49ers in 2020.

Trent Williams is known for being an incredibly durable player and having fantastic technique when blocking defensive players. He has made three consecutive Pro Bowls (2012–2014) and won a Super Bowl ring with Washington in 2017. Williams will be 38 years old at the end of 2021 season and it remains to be seen whether or not he will continue playing after that point given his age and recent injury history.

Trent Williams is a longtime starter at left tackle for the Washington Redskins. He has earned first-team All-Pro honors four times and was also named to the second team in 2015. Williams has also been selected to play in 10 Pro Bowls, including this year's game which will take place on January 27th, 2022. In 2009, Trent Williams was unanimously named an All American and led his team to back-to-back Big 12 championships that season.

As one of the best offensive lineman in NFL history, Trent Williams should be considered for induction into the Hall of Fame when his career comes to a close later this decade or early 2020s

Final Words

. . The Washington Football Team is a professional American football team based in the Washington metropolitan area. The team has won three national championships (1932, 1937, and 1971), as well as eight conference championships.

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