Negro League Baseball Best Players of All Time

Negro League Baseball was an integral part of the American sports landscape for over half a century. It provided African Americans with the opportunity to compete in professional baseball, something that would not have been possible without it due to segregation at the time. The Negro Leagues produced some of the greatest players and most memorable moments in baseball history, becoming both a source of pride and entertainment while helping break down racial barriers.

1. Josh Gibson

Josh Gibson Career

  • Batting average: .374
  • Hits: 806
  • Home runs: 165
  • Runs batted in: 725
  • 12× All-Star (1933–1936, 1939, 1942–1944, 1946), 2× Negro World Series champion (1943, 1944), 3× Negro National League batting champion (1936, 1937, 1939), 2× Triple Crown (1936, 1937), Washington Nationals Ring of Honor, Pirates Hall of Fame

Josh Gibson was one of the most legendary Negro League players ever and his stats prove it. He had a batting average of .374 and hit806 hits in his career.

Gibson played for the Homestead Grays from 1930 to 1946, winning three league championships with them. Gibson's death at the age of 35 is still regarded as a tragedy by baseball fans, due to his outstanding skills on the field and off it.

Gibson was one of the most dominant hitters in Negro League history, and is widely considered to be one of the best players ever to play the game. 2. He led his teams to three championships during a Hall-of-Famer career that spanned over 20 years.

3. Gibson's home runs were legendary, as he hit 165 between 1930 and 1946. 4. Gibson was also an excellent fielder, winning two batting titles while also accumulating 725 RBIs in his career

2. Satchel Paige

Satchel Paige Career

  • 2× MLB All-Star (1952, 1953), 6× Negro league All-Star (1933–1934, 1936, 1941–1943), World Series champion (1948), Negro World Series champion (1942), Triple Crown (1944), Cleveland Guardians Hall of Fame, Oldest Major League Baseball player in history

Satchel Paige was a legendary pitcher who played for the Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Athletics in the MLB. He won 118 games in his career and lost 80, which is an impressive record.

Paige began his baseball career playing for the Birmingham Black Barons of the Negro Leagues, before making his debut with the Cleveland Indians in 1947. During his nine-year MLB career, Paige posted some remarkable stats, including a win-loss record of 118–80 and an ERA of 2.61.

After leavesing the MLB in 1965, Paige continued to pitch successfully into his 70s; he passed away at age 75 in 1982 after having battled Alzheimer's disease for several years beforehand. Satchel Paige was one of the most successful pitchers in baseball history. He won over 1,500 games and led his teams to championship appearances on multiple occasions.

Satchel Paige is also known for his blazing speed on the field and legendary throwing motion. Despite his impressive stats, Paige never received an MVP award or a Cy Young Award nomination during his career because they were primarily given out to players who are considered "traditional" starters. In 1997, Satchel Paige was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in Cooperstown, New York alongside other legends such as Babe Ruth and Willie Mays.

Nowadays, Satchel Paige tours throughout various countries performing clinics and speaking about the joys of pitching while continuing to inspire young athletes everywhere he goes

3. Oscar Charleston

Oscar Charleston Career

  • 3× Negro National League pennant (1933, 1935, 1936), 3× East–West All-Star Game selection (1933–1935)[7], Negro National League batting champion (1921), 2× Eastern Colored League batting champion (1924, 1925), 3× Triple Crown (1921, 1924, 1925), Pirates Hall of Fame

Charleston was a center fielder for the Indianapolis ABCs in 1915. He played briefly for the Philadelphia Stars in 1941 before retiring from professional basketball.

Charleston accumulated 1,207 hits and 143 home runs over his career in the NBL. Charleston died on October 5, 1954 at the age of 57 after complications from surgery to remove a tumor from his neck Oscar Charleston led the Indianapolis Crawfords to a championship in 1940.

Oscar Charleston was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962. He managed teams in Philadelphia, Toledo, and Indianapolis before retiring as a manager after the 1941 season. Oscar Charleston died at age 83 in 1976.

4. Rube Foster

Rube Foster Career

  • Managerial record: 336–195–11
  • 4× Negro National League pennant (1920–1922, 1926)

Rube Foster was a hugely successful pitcher and manager in both the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball. He began his career with the Chicago Union Giants in 1902, before moving onto manage the Chicago American Giants later that year.

In 1917, he moved to the Boston Red Sox where he would stay for two seasons, managing them to a combined record of 36-36. After leaving baseball, Foster ran a grocery store in Kankakee, Illinois until his death from pneumonia at 51 years old in 1930.

Foster was one of the most successful managers in Negro National League history, leading Chicago American Giants to four pennants and a World Series championship. Foster also played for several teams during his career, including the Louisville White Sox and Chicago Union Giants.

He is considered one of the pioneers of African American baseball management and has been honored by both the Negro Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum as well as numerous other organizations.

5. Buck Leonard

Buck Leonard Career

  • 13× All-Star (1935, 1937–1941, 1943–1946, 1948²), 3× Negro World Series champion (1943, 1944, 1948), 2× Negro National League batting champion (1935, 1938), Washington Nationals Ring of Honor, Pirates Hall of Fame

Buck Leonard was a Negro league baseball player who had an impressive career. He batted left and threw left, making him one of the rare MLB players to have played both positions.

His first major league appearance came with the Homestead Grays in 1934 and he would go on to play for five other teams over 17 seasons. In 1950 he made his final big-league appearance at age 47.

His batting average was .345 and he hit 724 hits, 95 home runs, and 550 runs batted in during his career. He also led the Negro leagues in hitting four times during his illustrious playing days. Buck Leonard is most famous for being part of Jackie Robinson's debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 - a moment which helped break down racial barriers in Major League Baseball once and for all Buck Leonard was one of the most dominant hitters in Negro league history.

He won three batting championships and appeared in 13 All-Star games. Buck Leonard also had a distinguished military career, serving in both World War II and the Korean War. After retiring from baseball, Buck Leonard worked as an umpire for several years before passing away at the age of 74 in 2006

6. Cool Papa Bell

Cool Papa Bell Career

  • 2x Negro World Series champ (1943, 1944), 8x All-Star (1933–1936, 1942 (2)-1944), Lifetime batting average: .337 (Negro leagues), Washington Nationals Ring of Honor

Cool Papa Bell was a center fielder who played in the Negro leagues from 1922 to 1946. He had a batting average of .325 and 57 home runs, and 593 RBIs in his career.

Bell also threw left-handed, which helped him field many balls at high speeds. Cool Papa Bell is considered one of the best defensive center fielders in history, earning nine Gold Gloves during his playing days.

After retiring as a player, Cool Papa Bell served as an executive with several baseball organizations including the Boston Red Sox and St Louis Cardinals. On March 7th 1991, aged 87 years old, Cool Papa Bell died after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease Cool Papa Bell was a great player and one of the most popular in Negro League history.

He played for teams including the St. Louis Stars, Detroit Wolves, Kansas City Monarchs, Santo Domingo and Homestead Grays before moving to Mexico where he had success with Rojos del Águila de Veracruz and Sultanes de Monterrey. After retiring from playing baseball he worked as a manager in the Mexican winter league before passing away at age 71 in 1984.

7. Smokey Joe Williams

Smokey Joe Williams Career

  • Pitched a no-hitter on May 4, 1919 in Harlem[3]

Williams was one of the most successful black pitchers in history, winning 324 games over his career. He played for a number of teams throughout his career, but is best remembered for his time with the Detroit Wolves.

Williams died in 1951 at the age of 64 after a long battle with cancer. Smokey Joe Williams was an African American pitcher who helped lead the Black Bronchos to a championship in 1905. After winning with San Antonio, he went on to play for the Chicago Giants and New York Lincoln Giants before retiring in 1923.

Smokey Joe Williams is one of only two players (the other being Warren Spahn) inducted into both the National Baseball Hall of Fame and the Negro Leagues Hall of Fame. He also received many awards during his career, including three MVP Awards (1916, 1919, 1922).

8. Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson Career

  • NgL All-Star (1945), 6× All-Star (1949–1954), World Series champion (1955), NL MVP (1949), MLB Rookie of the Year (1947), NL batting champion (1949), 2× NL stolen base leader (1947, 1949), Los Angeles Dodgers No. 42 retired, No. 42 retired by all MLB teams, UCLA Bruins No. 42 retired[1], Monument Park honoree, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Jackie Robinson was born on January 31, 1919 in Cairo, Georgia. He broke the color barrier in MLB with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947, becoming the first African American to play major league baseball.

Robinson went on to have an illustrious career as a second baseman and player-manager for several teams before retiring from MLB in 1956. After his retirement from playing baseball, he became a successful civil rights activist and served as chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) until his death in 1972 at age 53 years old.

Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball. He broke baseball's color barrier in 1947 and became an icon for civil rights movements across America. Robinson continued to play successfully into his late 40s, becoming a Hall of Fame player and leading the Dodgers to their only World Series victory. Jackie Robinson died at age 53 in April 1972 after a long battle with cancer.

9. Turkey Stearnes

Turkey Stearnes Career

  • 5× All-Star (1932, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1939), 2× Negro National League batting champion (1929, 1931), Negro Southern League pennant (1932), Negro American League pennant (1939)

Turkey Stearnes was one of the most accomplished players in NBL history. He played for six different teams over a span of twenty-two seasons and averaged more than thirty points per game.

Turkey Stearnes was born on May 8, 1901 in Nashville, Tennessee. His early career included playing for the Giants during the 1920s before moving to Kansas City in 1940 where he spent his final two years in the league.

As an outfielder, Turkey Stearnes led both leagues with 186 home runs during his career and hit .349 overall; he also stole 997 bases and scored 1,316 points. After retiring from professional basketball following the 1941 season, Turkey Stearne returned to work as a coach with several minor league baseball teams before passing away on September 4th, 1979 at age 78 after suffering from Alzheimer's Disease for many years prior to that point

10. John Henry Lloyd

John Henry Lloyd Career

  • Batting average: .349
  • Hits: 569
  • Runs batted in: 308
  • Lifetime batting average: .349 (Negro leagues), Eastern Colored League pennant (1923)

Lloyd was a shortstop who played in the Negro leagues from 1906 to 1932. He had a batting average of .349 and 569 hits in his career. Lloyd died at age 79 after an illness in 1964.

Lloyd was born on October 15, 1878 in Columbus, Ohio. Lloyd began playing professional baseball with the Columbus Buckeyes of the American Association in 1901. He made his major league debut with the Philadelphia Giants in 1907 and played for them until 1909 when he joined the Cuban X-Giants of the National League.

Lloyd rejoined Philadelphia two years later and spent another four seasons with them before being traded to the Leland Giants midway through 1910 season. After one year as manager of that team, he took over as player/manager of the Chicago American Giants for three more seasons (1914–17). In 1921, John Henry became manager of Hilldale Club where he remained for five seasons before retiring from baseball at age 35 in 1927

11. Monte Irvin

Monte Irvin Career

  • 4x NgL All-Star (1941, 1946–1948), MLB All-Star (1952), Negro World Series champion (1946), World Series champion (1954), 2× Negro National League batting champion (1941, 1946), NL RBI leader (1951), San Francisco Giants No. 20 retired

Monte Irvin was a Hall of Fame left fielder who played for the Giants and Cubs in MLB. He batted .304 over 19 seasons and had 3,060 hits in his career. Irvin is best known for hitting two home runs in Game 7 of the 1951 World Series to help New York win their fourth championship title.

After retiring as a player, Monte Irvin served as an executive with several baseball organizations before passing away at 96 years old on January 11, 2016. Monte Irvin was one of the most prolific hitters in Negro league history. He led the circuit in home runs and RBIs four times each, while batting over .300 on two occasions.

Irvin made his major league debut with the Giants in 1949 and helped them win their first championship that season. He played six more seasons with New York before joining the Cubs for a final stint in 1956. After retiring from baseball, Irvin spent several years as a broadcaster for both black and white networks before passing away at age 72 in 1998.

12. Martín Dihigo

Martín Dihigo Career

  • 2× Negro League All-Star (1935, 1945), 4× Cuban League MVP (1927/28, 1935/36, 1936/37, 1941/42), Eastern Colored League batting champion (1926), Only player in History to be elected to 5 different Hall of Fames, Elected to Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame (1951), Elected to Mexican Baseball Hall of Fame (1964), Elected to Venezuelan Hall of Fame, Elected to Dominican Hall of Fame, , Cuban League records, , 107 career wins, 121 career complete games, , Mexican League records, , .676 career winning percentage ( > 1,000 innings)

Dihigo was a pitcher and second baseman who played for several teams in Cuba and Mexico. He had a batting average of .307 and 436 hits in his Cuban league career, along with 68 home runs.

Dihigo also made 309 runs batted in during his Mexican League career, playing for Águila de Veracruz between 1950-1951. Martín Dihigo died at the age of 64 after a long illness on May 20th, 1971.

Martín Dihigo was a Cuban baseball player who had a long and successful career in the Negro leagues. He is best known for his time with the New York Cubans, where he won three championships. After retiring from playing, Dihigo served as manager of several teams in Cuba and Mexico.

13. Bullet Rogan

Bullet Rogan Career

  • Win–loss record: 120–52
  • Earned run average: 2.65
  • Strikeouts: 918
  • Batting average: .338
  • Hits: 693
  • Stolen bases: 106
  • Negro World Series champion (1924), 4× Negro National League pennant (1923, 1924, 1925, 1929), Negro American League pennant (1937), All-Star (1936), On August 6, 1923, combined with José Méndez on no-hitter against the Milwaukee Bears, Played in first night game in baseball history, April 29, 1930, Toured the Philippines, Japan, and China in 1933–34 with the Philadelphia Royal Giants

Bullet Rogan was a right-handed pitcher and outfielder who played in Negro leagues for over 30 years. He had a career win-loss record of 120–52, with a 2.65 earned run average.

Bullet Rogan led the Negro leagues in strikeouts nine times, and batting average three times. Bullet Rogan died from cancer at the age of 73 in 1967 Rogan, who was born in Kansas City, Missouri on February 8, 1897, played for the Negro National League's 25th Infantry Wreckers and All Nations from 1917 to 1920.

In 1921 he joined the Kansas City Monarchs where he spent 10 seasons as a player and one as manager. He led the Monarchs to four Negro American League pennants (1923-1925-1929) and one Negro World Series title in 1924. Rogan also made three all-star teams during his career while playing at shortstop or second base.

On August 6, 1923 he helped lead an unassisted no hit performance by José Méndez against Milwaukee Bears which marked baseball's first night game ever played

14. Leon Day

Leon Day Career

  • Win–loss record: 48–21
  • Earned run average: 3.50
  • Batting average: .318
  • 9× All-Star (1935, 1937, 1939, 1939², 1942, 1942², 1943, 1946, 1946², Negro World Series champion (1946)

Leon Day was a pitcher in the Negro league for over 40 years. He had a 48-21 win-loss record and an ERA of 3.50. Day died at the age of 78 after a long illness, although he continued to pitch until just before his death.

Leon Day was an all-star player in the Negro leagues and a two-time Negro World Series champion. Leon day is one of only five men to have played in both the Major and Negro Leagues, as well as being inducted into both Halls of Fame.

Day's batting average (.318) during his career is still third best among players with at least 1,000 hits..

15. Ray Dandridge

Ray Dandridge Career

  • 3× All-Star (1935, 1937, 1944), American Association MVP (1950), Salón de la Fama del Beisbol Profesional de México (1989), , Negro leagues, , Lifetime batting average: .355

Ray Dandridge had a long and successful career as a third baseman in the Negro leagues. He made his debut with the Indianapolis ABCs in 1933, and also played for the Detroit Stars and Newark Dodgers over the next few years.

In 1955 he retired from playing baseball after a lengthy stint with the Bismarck Barons. Ray Dandridge later worked as an executive for many different companies, including Coca-Cola and Ford Motor Company, before passing away in 1994 at age 80.

Ray Dandridge was a professional baseball player who played in the Negro leagues. Ray Dandridge is best known for playing with the Newark Eagles, where he won three All-Star games and MVP honors in 1950. Following his success in the Negro leagues, Ray Dandridge joined several other teams before retiring in 1955.

16. Judy Johnson

Judy Johnson Career

  • 2× All-Star (1933, 1936), Negro World Series champion (1925)

Johnson made her Negro league debut in 1921 with the Hilldale Club. She was a consistent player over the next several years, batting .291 or better in each of those seasons.

In 1924 she helped lead the Colored World Series champion Philadelphia Stars to their first championship. Johnson played until 1928 and then retired from baseball due to injuries sustained while playing softball on a team sponsored by African-American businessmen in Wilmington, Delaware.

After retirement she worked as an insurance agent for many years before retiring completely in 1982 at age 78 years old after suffering two strokes that left her unable to speak or write properly ever again.. Judy Johnson is considered one of the greatest third basemen in Negro league history and one of only three players (along with Buck Leonard and Satchel Paige) who have won both MVP Awards and championships with different teams during their careers (the other two being Willie Mays and Joe DiMaggio).

17. Biz Mackey

Biz Mackey Career

  • Batting average: .328
  • Hits: 1,008
  • Runs batted in: 603
  • Home runs: 52
  • Managerial record: 186–143–9
  • 5× East-West All-Star Game (1933, 1935, 1936, 1938, 1947), 2× Negro World Series champion (1925, 1946), Eastern Colored League batting champion (1923)

Biz Mackey was a catcher in the Negro leagues for over 30 years. He had a batting average of .328 and 1,008 hits in that time. Biz Mackey played with the San Antonio Black Aces (1918-1950) and Newark Eagles (1950-1965).

Biz Mackey is best known for his playing days with the Philadelphia Phillies during World War II where he helped lead them to an American League pennant in 1944. After his playing career ended, Biz Mackey became a coach and manager in several Negro leagues teams before retiring in 1966 aged 68 years old.

Biz Mackey was a manager in the Negro leagues for over twenty years, including nine seasons with the Newark Dodgers. He led his teams to winning records in six of those nine seasons and won two Negro League championships (in 1935 and 1938). Mackey was also inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971.

18. Bill Foster

Bill Foster Career

  • Win–loss record: 143–69
  • Earned run average: 2.40
  • 2× All-Star (1933, 1934), 2× Negro League World Series champion (1926, 1927)

Bill Foster was a pitcher and outfielder in the Negro National League. He had a 143-69 win-loss record in his career. Foster debuted with the Memphis Red Sox in 1923, but he would only play for them for one season before moving to the Chicago American Giants later that year.

Foster played until 1937, retiring at the age of 46 due to injuries sustained during his career. After retirement from baseball, Foster worked as an insurance agent and died in 1978 at 74 years old Foster was an all-star in the Negro Leagues and a champion of the world series.

Foster is one of just five players to win three batting titles in the Negro Leagues, and he led his league eight times in home runs and RBIs during his career. Foster also starred as a pitcher for several teams over parts of 15 seasons, including stints with Memphis Red Sox (1923–24), Chicago American Giants (1923–30, 1932–35, 1937), Birmingham Black Barons (1925) and Homestead Grays (1931).

19. Willie Wells

Willie Wells Career

  • 10× All-Star (1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1939(1), 1939², 1942(1), 1942², 1945), 2× Negro National League pennant (1928, 1930), 2× Cuban League MVP (1929/30, 1939/40), Negro National League batting champion (1930), Triple Crown (1930), Negro National League record for most home runs in a season, 27 in 1926.

Willie Wells was a shortstop who played in both the Negro and Major League Baseball. Willie Wells was born on August 10, 1906 in Austin, Texas. Willie Wells made his debut with the St.

Louis Giants in 1924 and played for them until 1948 when he moved to Memphis to play for the Red Sox. In 1949 Willie Wells joined the Kansas City Monarchs where he would spend the remainder of his career playing until 1959 .

Willie Wells enjoyed great success during his MLB career batting over .300 several times and hitting over 140 home runs. He also amassed over 879 hits which is testament to how good a hitter he was overall.. While with Kansas City ,the Monarchs won two Negro League Championships (1951 & 1952) as well as one American Association Championship (1953).

After leaving baseball, Willie continued to live in Austin where he died aged 82 on January 22nd 1989

20. Willie Mays

Willie Mays Career

  • 24× All-Star (1954–1973), World Series champion (1954), 2× NL MVP (1954, 1965), NL Rookie of the Year (1951), 12× Gold Glove Award (1957–1968), Roberto Clemente Award (1971), NL batting champion (1954), 4× NL home run leader (1955, 1962, 1964, 1965), 4× NL stolen base leader (1956–1959), Hit 4 home runs in one game on April 30, 1961, San Francisco Giants No. 24 retired, New York Mets No. 24 retired, San Francisco Giants Wall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, Major League Baseball All-Time Team

Willie Mays was one of the greatest players in baseball history and he is still considered one of the most iconic athletes. He was known for his power, speed, and batting ability.

His career spanned over five decades and he won numerous awards including three MVPs and an Oscar Award. Willie Mays passed away on September 9, 1973 after a long battle with cancer at the age of 51 years old.

Willie Mays was an all-time great outfielder who played for the Giants from 1951 to 1973. He won 24 All-Star games, and led the NL in home runs four times and stolen bases twice. In 1971, Willie Mays was awarded the Roberto Clemente Award, which is given to the best player in each league.

Willie Mays is also known for his record breaking performance on April 30th 1961 when he hit 4 home runs in one game against Philadelphia Phillies

21. Mule Suttles

Mule Suttles Career

  • 5× All-Star (1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1939), 2× Negro National League batting champion (1926, 1928), Triple Crown (1926)

Mule Suttles was a first baseman who played in the National Basketball League for five seasons, from 1921 to 1924 and again from 1944 to 1946. He averaged .339 with 1,088 hits and 179 home runs in his career.

Suttles spent most of his playing days with the Atlantic City Bacharach Giants, appearing in 140 games over four seasons before moving on to Newark Eagles where he finished up his NBL career. Mule Suttles was born on March 31, 1901 in Edgewater, Alabama and died on July 9th 1966 at the age of 65 years old after a long and successful career as a professional basketball player.

Mule Suttles was one of the most successful African American baseball players in history. He was a five-time all-star and batting champion, as well as a triple crown winner. After playing for several teams during his career, Mule Suttles finished with the Newark Eagles in 1940.

22. Ben Taylor

Ben Taylor Career

Ben Taylor was a first baseman who played in the Negro leagues during the early 20th century. He had a long and successful career in both black and white baseball, playing for teams including the Birmingham Giants, West Baden Sprudels, and St Louis Giants.

In 1929 he retired from professional ball after spending 14 seasons on various rosters across multiple leagues. Ben Taylor passed away in 1953 at the age of 64 years old. Ben Taylor is one of the most successful managers in baseball history. He led several teams to championships, including the Washington Pilots and Baltimore Black Sox.

Taylor was also a prolific hitter, playing for many years with the Philadelphia Phillies and Boston Red Sox. After his retirement as a player, he served as manager for several teams before being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984.

23. Larry Doby

Larry Doby Career

  • NgL All-Star (1946), 7× All-Star (1949–1955), Negro World Series champion (1946), World Series champion (1948), 2× AL home run leader (1952, 1954), AL RBI leader (1954), Cleveland Guardians No. 14 retired, Cleveland Guardians Hall of Fame

Doby was one of the most celebrated African American players in baseball history, playing for four different teams over a 14-year career. Doby made his MLB debut with the Indians on July 5, 1947 and helped lead Cleveland to their first World Series victory in 1948.

In 1957, Doby became the first black player ever elected to play in an All-Star Game and led Cleveland to another championship that season. After spending three seasons with the White Sox, Doby moved on to play for the Dragons in Japan before retiring at age 38 after being traded back to Cleveland in 1960.

Following his retirement from baseball, DBY served as a manager for several minor league teams before passing away in 2003 at the age of 79 Doby became the first African American to play in MLB when he played for the Cleveland Indians in 1947. Doby was a key player on two championship teams, with the Indians in 1948 and again with the White Sox in 1955.

After leaving baseball, Doby worked as an executive for several major league organizations before returning to playing baseball full-time in 2000. In 2011, Larry Doby was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum along with Jackie Robinson

24. Cristóbal Torriente

Cristóbal Torriente Career

  • Batting average: .340
  • Hits: 759
  • Home runs: 55
  • Runs batted in: 530
  • Stolen bases: 93
  • Negro National League batting champion (1920), 3× Negro National League pennant (1920–1922), , Cuban Winter League Baseball, , All time career batting average record: .352

Cristobal Torriente was a left-handed outfielder who played for the Chicago American Giants in 1920 and the Louisville Black Caps in 1932. He had an impressive batting average of .340 with 759 hits, 55 home runs, and 530 RBIs in his career.

Cristóbal Torriente died from a heart attack at age 44 while playing baseball for New York's African Americans on their spring training team. Cristóbal Torriente was one of the most successful catchers in Cuban baseball history. He began his career with Habana and helped lead them to two championships in 1912 and 1913.

Torriente then played for Almendares, where he won another championship in 1916. After a few years away from Cuban baseball, Torriente rejoined Albendares and led them to yet another title in 1917. The catcher then signed with Cuban Stars, where he would remain until 1916 when he left for All Nations briefly before returning to Cuba again later that year .

In 1918, Torriente joined the newly formed Major League Baseball team known as the Chicago American Giants but only played a handful of games before retiring at age 33 due to injury.. Torriente made a return to playing minor league ball after his retirement from MLB and continued doing so through 1931.. Torriente also served as manager for three teams during his playing days: Cuban Stars (1921), Louisville Black Caps (1932) and Atlanta Black Crackers (1933).

In all three instances, he led his teams to playoff appearances but never advanced past the first round.. In 2002 Cristobal Torienté was inducted into both the Caribbean Baseball Hall of Fame (inducted 2003)and the Florida State League Hall of Fame(inducted 2005).[4]

25. Buck O'Neil

Buck O Career

  • 2x All-Star (1942–1943), Negro World Series champion (1942), Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame

Buck O'Neil was a first baseman and Negro American League player who played for several teams over the course of his career. He was born in Carrabelle, Florida in 1911 and died there in 2006.

O'Neil batted right and threw right-handed, which made him an versatile player on the field. He had a batting average of .258 throughout his career, but he is most remembered for his spectacular home run against the Birmingham Black Barons during the 1955 season.

O'Neil's achievements as a player are commemorated by a plaque at baseball's Negro American League Museum in Kansas City, Missouri where he is also honoured with an annual award given to someone whose work has helped preserve African-American history and culture. Buck O'Neil was a talented player who had a long and successful career in baseball.

He is best known for his time with the Kansas City Monarchs, where he helped lead them to two Negro World Series titles. After retiring from playing, Buck became a manager and led several teams to success over the years. He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2022 and remains one of the most respected figures in the sport today.

26. Hilton Smith

Hilton Smith Career

  • 6× All-Star (1937–1942), Negro World Series champion (1942)

Hilton Smith was a Negro league baseball pitcher who played for the Monroe Monarchs and Kansas City Monarchs. He had a 71-31 record with 3.37 ERA in his career.

Hilton Smith was born on February 27, 1907, in Giddings, Texas. Hilton Smith died on November 18, 1983 at the age of 76 after suffering from heart disease for many years.

Hilton Smith made his Negro league baseball debut with the Monroe Monarchs in 1932 and continued playing until 1948 when he retired from professional baseball Hilton Smith was an all-star center fielder in the Negro leagues from 1937 to 1942.

He led his team to a Negro World Series championship in 1942 and was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2001.

27. Willard Brown

Willard Brown Career

  • 4x Negro American League pennant (1937, 1939, 1940, 1941), Negro World Series champion (1942), 6x NgL All-Star (1936–1937, 1942–1943, 1948–1949), Negro American League batting champion (1947), First African-American to hit a home run in the American League

Brown was one of the most successful and durable hitters in baseball history. He batted over .300 for 15 seasons and hit 529 home runs during his career.

Brown spent most of his playing days with the St. Louis Browns, where he became a three-time All-Star and won a World Series title in 1948. After retiring as a player, Brown served as an executive with several MLB teams before passing away in 1996 at the age of 81 years old.

Brown was an All-Star outfielder for both the Negro American League and Major League Baseball. He hit 49 home runs in his career, making him one of the most successful black players in baseball history. Brown also had 354 RBIs over his career, which is still a record for a black player in MLB history.

He played with the Kansas City Monarchs (1936–1944) and St Louis Browns (1947). After playing professional baseball, Brown became a coach and manager at various levels of ball until he retired in 1997

28. Louis Santop

Louis Santop Career

Louis Santop was a catcher in the Negro leagues for over 20 years. He had a successful career, winning several awards and making many contributions to Negro league baseball.

Santop died in 1942 at the age of 52 after succumbing to an illness. Louis Santop was a pitcher for the Hilldale Club in the Negro League from 1918-1926. 2. He had an impressive record, with a 153-59 win percentage and 1,845 strikeouts during his career.

3. Santop also played on three championship teams - 1920 (Brooklyn Royal Giants), 1921 (New York Lincoln Giants) and 1924 (Hilldale Club). 4. After he retired from playing baseball, Louis Santop became a manager in the Negro League and led several teams to championships before his death at age 58 in 1955

29. Andy Cooper

Andy Cooper Career

  • Win–loss record: 118–64
  • Earned run average: 3.58
  • East-West All-Star Game (1933, 1936), Negro National League pennant (1929), 3x Negro American League pennant (1937, 1939, 1940)

Andy Cooper was a pitcher for the Negro leagues who played from 1920 until 1939. He had a winning record of 118-64 and an ERA of 3.58. Andy Cooper made his major league debut with the Detroit Stars in 1920 and spent most of his career with the Kansas City Monarchs, appearing in only nine games over that span before retiring at the age of 43.

Andy Cooper's death at the age of 43 was due to injuries he sustained while playing ball - specifically, a broken arm suffered during one game against the Chicago American Giants on June 3, 1941. Cooper played in the Negro American League, which was considered one of the top black baseball leagues at the time. Cooper managed in the Negro American League and won 3 pennants with Kansas City Monarchs.

He is also a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame

30. Jud Wilson

Jud Wilson Career

  • Batting average: .352
  • Hits: 1,073
  • Home runs: 77
  • Runs batted in: 724
  • Stolen bases: 104
  • 2× Eastern Colored League batting champion (1927, 1928), 2× Negro World Series champion (1943, 1944), Washington Nationals Ring of Honor

Jud Wilson was a third baseman for the Homestead Grays in 1945. He had a batting average of .352 and hit 77 home runs during his career. Jud Wilson is most famous for playing with the Baltimore Black Sox in 1922, when he made his league debut.

Jud Wilson died on June 24th, 1963 at the age of 69 after a long and successful baseball career. Jud Wilson was one of the most successful African American players in baseball history. He played for six different teams throughout his career and won a total of seven championships.

Jud Wilson is also one of only three players to twice win the batting title in the Eastern Colored League (ECL). In 1927, he led the league with an average of .354 and won the Championship Series MVP award. Two years later, he repeated as ECL batting champion with an average of .350.

After playing two seasons (1931-1932) for Homestead Grays, Jud moved on to play for Pittsburgh Crawfords before finally ending his career with Philadelphia Stars in 1939. Throughout his MLB career, Jud hit over .300 four times and stole 104 bases.

31. José Méndez

José Méndez Career

  • Managerial record: 196-100-5
  • Negro World Series champion (1924), 3× Negro National League pennant (1923–1925)

José Méndez was a pitcher in the Cuban League who had a 196-100-5 record as a manager. He debuted with the Almendares in 1907 and played his last game for the Kansas City Monarchs in 1926.

José Méndez is best known for leading the Almendares to three consecutive championships from 1915-17, which is still an all time Cuban League record. After leaving baseball, José Méndez ran several businesses in Havana before dying of tuberculosis at 43 years old in 1928.

José Méndez was a Cuban baseball player who enjoyed great success in the Negro National League. He played for several teams over the course of his career, including Almendares (1907–1916), Brooklyn Royal Giants (1908), Almendares Park (1911–1912), Cuban Stars (1909–1912) and All Nations (1913– 1917).

Méndez is one of only a few players to win three Negro National League pennants and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.

32. Ray Brown

Ray Brown Career

  • 2× Negro World Series champion (1943, 1944), Triple Crown (1938), Washington Nationals Ring of Honor, Pirates Hall of Fame

Raymond Brown was one of the most successful black MLB pitchers in history. He debuted with the Dayton Marcos in 1930 and went on to win 122 games over the course of his career.

Brown also had a very successful record as a relief pitcher, earning an ERA of just 3.02 during that time period. Raymond Brown died from lung cancer at the age of 56 years old, leaving behind a legacy as one of baseball's all-time greats for African Americans Brown was a standout player during the Negro Leagues and helped lead several teams to championships.

Brown was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006 and is still considered one of the greatest African American players ever.

33. J. L. Wilkinson

J. L. Wilkinson Career

  • Served as secretary of the Negro National League., His Monarchs teams won ten league pennants and two Black World Series championships., Organized the first night game in baseball history, played on April 29, 1930, Signed Jackie Robinson in 1945.

J. L. Wilkinson was a baseball owner and executive who played an important role in the Negro National League during its early years. He is most notable for his work as president of the league's Kansas City Monarchs, which he led to three consecutive championship titles from 1922-24.

After leaving the Monarchs, Wilkinson served as a general manager and team owner in several other leagues before retiring in 1957. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1964 and has been cited as one of the pioneers of African American professional baseball J. L. Wilkinson was a key figure in the promotion and development of black baseball in America, working tirelessly to make it accessible to all players.

He served as secretary for the Negro National League and helped build some of the most successful teams in history, including the Kansas City Monarchs (1920-1948) who won ten league pennants and two Black World Series championships. In 1930, he organized one of baseball's first night games when Philadelphia played New York at Yankee Stadium - an event that has since become an annual tradition. After Robinson signed with the Dodgers in 1945, Wilkinson was instrumental in getting him on board and helped pave the way for equality within professional sports leagues across America.

34. Hank Aaron

Hank Aaron Career

  • 25× All-Star (1955–1975), World Series champion (1957), NL MVP (1957), 3× Gold Glove Award (1958–1960), 2× NL batting champion (1956, 1959), 4× NL home run leader (1957, 1963, 1966, 1967), 4× NL RBI leader (1957, 1960, 1963, 1966), Atlanta Braves No. 44 retired, Milwaukee Brewers No. 44 retired, Braves Hall of Fame, American Family Field Walk of Fame, Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor, Major League Baseball All-Century Team, , MLB records, , 2,297 career runs batted in, 6,856 career total bases, 1,477 career extra-base hits

Hank Aaron was one of the most outstanding baseball players in history and is widely considered to be one of the greatest hitters in MLB history. He retired with a .305 batting average, 3,771 hits, and 382 home runs.

Aaron played his entire career for the Milwaukee Braves (1954-1976). In 1974 he led the Braves to their first World Series championship since 1957 and became only the third player ever to win three MVP Awards (the other two being Willie Mays and Babe Ruth).

After retiring from baseball, Aaron served as a television sportscaster for several networks before passing away at age 86 on January 22nd, 2021. Hank Aaron is one of the most iconic and successful baseball players in history. He was a five-time all-star, won three World Series titles with the Atlanta Braves, and holds numerous records.

Hank Aaron was born on February 5th, 1935 in Mobile, Alabama. He made his major league debut with the Milwaukee Braves in 1954 at the age of 20 and went on to be one of baseball's greatest hitters during his 14 year career. Some of Aaron's most impressive records include being the all-time home run leader (755), batting champion (1957 & 1959), RBI leader (1960 & 1963), as well as having 3 gold gloves award for defensive excellence over that time period.

On September 7th 1974 he passed Babe Ruth for first place on MLB's all-time hits list - a record which still stands today. Hank Aaron has been inducted into both the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975 as well as both the Atlanta Braves Hall Of Fame and American Family Field Walk Of Fame - making him an extremely celebrated figure within America's favorite pastime.

35. Sol White

Sol White Career

  • Negro league baseball, Managed Philadelphia Giants to four straight black baseball championships (1904–1907), Wrote first book on black professional baseball, Sol White's Official Base Ball Guide (1907)

White played for several teams in the early part of his career, most notably with Pittsburgh and Newark. White was a key player on some successful teams, such as the 1890s' Wheeling Green Stockings and Ohio State League squads.

White managed in later years after hanging up his spikes, including stints with Newark (1926) and Central Islip (1955). Sol White passed away at 87 years old after a long and successful baseball career. Sol White was a black baseball promoter, author and editor who is best known for his 1907 book, "Sol White's Official Base Ball Guide." He helped shape the sport of modern baseball as we know it by promoting innovative rules and strategies that were ahead of their time.

White also played an important role in player development and helped to introduce new players to the game at a time when opportunities were few and far between. Thanks to his work, many current stars of today owe their start in professional ball directly to Sol White.

36. Cumberland Posey

Cumberland Posey Career

  • Washington Nationals Ring of Honor
  • High school: Homestead (Homestead, Pennsylvania)
  • College: , Penn State (1909–1911), Duquesne (1916–1918)
  • 5× Colored Basketball World Champion (1912, 1920–1923), Pittsburgh City Champion (1908)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Cumberland Posey was an outfielder and manager who played for the Homestead Grays from 1911-1946. He is most famous for his time with the Nationals, where he won a Ring of Honor induction in 1973.

Posey also gained notoriety as the owner of several Negro League teams during his career, including the Pittsburgh Crawfords (1936–1945) and Baltimore Elite Giants (1937). Cumberland Posey passed away at age 55 in 1946 after a lengthy battle with heart disease.

Cumberland Posey was one of the first black players in professional basketball. Cumberland Posey played for various teams during his career, most notably Duquesne and the Pittsburgh Pirates. Cumberland Posey is also notable for being one of the few African-American players to play in NBA competition.

Cumberland Posey died in 1946 at the age of 55 after a long illness, leaving behind a legacy as one of the pioneers of professional basketball

37. Effa Manley

Effa Manley Career

  • Negro World Series champion (1946)

Effa Manley was an owner of the Newark Eagles, a professional basketball team that played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) from 1936-1948. She was also well known for her philanthropic work, particularly with children's charities and educational institutions.

Effa Manley died in 1981 at the age of 84 after a long battle with arthritis. Effa Manley was a famed Negro League baseball player who won the championship in 1946. 2. She is also one of only three women to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, alongside Lou Gehrig and Babe Ruth.

3. Effa Manley's career highlight came when she pitched an entire game against the all-male Chicago American Giants team, which she led to victory with her excellent pitching performances. 4. After retiring from playing professionally, Effa Manley served as a sportswoman administrator for many years before passing away in 2004 at the age of 91

38. Roy Campanella

Roy Campanella Career

  • Batting average: .283
  • Hits: 1,401
  • Home runs: 260
  • Runs batted in: 1,017
  • Stolen bases: 34
  • 3x NgL All-Star (1941, 1944–1945), 8× All-Star (1949–1956), World Series champion (1955), 3× NL MVP (1951, 1953, 1955), Negro National League batting champion (1945), NL RBI leader (1953), Los Angeles Dodgers No. 39 retired

Roy Campanella was an all-star catcher in both the MLB and AAA for many years. He started his career with the Washington Elite Giants, then played for the Brooklyn Dodgers before retiring in 1957.

Campanella is most famous for his role as a member of the 'Million Dollar Quartet' alongside Jackie Robinson, Willie Mays and Joe DiMaggio, who helped lead baseball to its golden era after World War II.

After retirement from playing, Roy went into broadcasting and worked until he died at 71 years old in 1993. Campanella was a three-time All-Star and won three World Series titles with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Campanella's ability to hit for average, power and speed made him one of the most feared hitters in baseball during his era. After playing ten seasons with the Washington / Baltimore Elite Giants (1937–1945), Campanella joined the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948 and played there until 1957.

Roy is often cited as one of the pioneers of modern day bunting, which helped him rack up more than 1,000 runs batted in over his career. In 1955 he became only the second player to win both an MVP award and a World Series championship in the same season – a feat that still stands today.

Roy retired from professional baseball after finishing his final season with the Los Angeles Dodgers at age 38; since then he has been involved in broadcasting, coaching and other business ventures

39. Ernie Banks

Ernie Banks Career

  • 14× All-Star (1955–1960², 1961²–1962², 1965, 1967, 1969), 2× NL MVP (1958, 1959), Gold Glove Award (1960), 2× NL home run leader (1958, 1960), 2× NL RBI leader (1958, 1959), Chicago Cubs No. 14 retired, Chicago Cubs Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Ernie Banks was a Hall of Fame shortstop and first baseman for the Chicago Cubs. He won nine Gold Glove Awards, three National League MVP Awards, and two World Series championships.

Ernie Banks was born in Dallas, Texas on January 31st 1931. His father played professional baseball and his older brother also became a major league player. After playing football at San Antonio College, Ernie signed with the Chicago Cubs as an amateur free agent in 1951.

He made his MLB debut that year and went on to play 19 seasons for the Cubs before retiring after the 1971 season. During his career, Banks set numerous records including most hits (2,583), home runs (675), RBIs (1,409), slugging percentage (.609) and total bases (4,849). He is also third all-time in doubles (382) behind only Stan Musial and Hank Aaron .

In 1969 he became just the second player ever to lead both leagues in batting average (.406) while winning MVP honors both leagues - joining Ty Cobb . Following his retirement from baseball Ernie spent several years working as a television sportscaster before passing away at age 83 on January 23rd 2015 due to complications from Alzheimer's Disease .

40. Frank Grant

Frank Grant Career

Frank Grant was an accomplished second baseman in the Negro Leagues. He played for the Cuban Giants from 1889 to 1903, and for the Philadelphia Giants from 1903 to 1937.

Grant is best known for his time with the Philadelphia Giants, where he led the team in batting average twice and won two National League pennants. After retiring as a player, Grant served as manager of several teams before dying at age 71 in 1937.

Frank Grant was a pitcher during the late 1800s and early 1900s. He spent most of his career with the Buffalo Bisons, although he also played for the Cuban Giants and Philadelphia Giants. Grant is remembered as one of the best African-American pitchers in history, winning over 100 games throughout his career.

He is also notable for being one of only two players to win three World Series titles (with the other player being Babe Ruth).

41. Pete Hill

Pete Hill Career

  • Negro league baseball, Lifetime batting average: .326

Pete Hill was an outfielder who played in the Negro leagues from 1899 to 1925. He had a long and successful career, playing for several teams including Pittsburgh Keystones, Cuban X-Giants, and Baltimore Black Sox.

Pete Hill is remembered as one of the best black players of his era and is now considered a pioneer in baseball history. Pete Hill was one of the most successful African American baseball players in history. He played for a number of teams during his career, including the Philadelphia Giants (1903- 1907), Habana (1907- 1912), Leland Giants ( 1908- 1910) and Brooklyn Royal Giants ( 1908 - 1909).

Hill is perhaps best known for his time with the Chicago American Giants, where he won two Negro league championships in 1911 and 1912. After playing briefly with the San Francisco Park team in 1915, Pete Hill joined the Detroit Stars as their first black player ever before retiring from professional baseball at age 30 due to an injury sustained while playing semi-pro ball. Later on, Pete Hill served as manager of several minor league teams before being inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006

42. John Beckwith

John Beckwith Career

  • Batting average: .349
  • Hits: 636
  • Home runs: 76
  • Runs batted in: 461
  • Stolen bases: 40
  • Managerial record: 63–53–1
  • Negro National League pennant (1922)

Beckwith was a utility infielder and manager who played in the 1920s and 1930s. Beckwith spent most of his career with the Brooklyn Royal Giants, but also played for the Montgomery Grey Sox early in his career.

Beckwith was one of baseball's all-time great pinch hitters, hitting .349 with 636 hits and 76 home runs over parts of nine seasons. After retiring as a player, Beckworth served as a manager for several teams before dying in 1956 at the age of 55.

Beckwith led the Black Sox to victory in their first and only World Series. Beckwith was one of baseball's most successful managers, guiding teams to a record 63 wins over 53 losses during his career. After managing the Brooklyn Dodgers for two seasons, Beckwith took over as manager of the Chicago Giants in 1916 where he remained until 1921.

Following his stint with the Giants, Beckwith managed several other teams before retiring from coaching following the season that saw him take charge of the Baltimore Black Sox in 1924-1926. Although he never won an MVP award or made it to The Show, John Beckwith is considered one of baseball's greatest managers due to his success leading various teams to championships throughout his long managerial career

43. Dick Redding

Dick Redding Career

  • Run average: 4.71
  • Earned run average: 3.64

Dick Redding was a pitcher in Negro league baseball. Dick Redding made his debut with the Lincoln Giants in 1911 and played with them until 1932. Dick Redding is best known for his time spent with the Bacharach Giants, where he led the team to three championships (1927-29, 1931).

After playing his last season with the Bacharach Giants, Dick Redding retired from professional baseball and moved to New York City to continue working as a carpenter. Dick Redding passed away at age 58 after a long illness sustained while working on construction projects in New York City Dick Redding was a left-handed pitcher who played in Negro leagues from 1911 to 1931.

Redding had an illustrious career, winning 128 games and losing only 62. He is best known for his time with the Bacharach Giants, where he won two league championships (1919 and 1922). After retiring from baseball, Dick Redding became a coach and manager in the Negro leagues. Dick Redding passed away in October of 2003 at the age of 95 years old.

44. Alex Pompez

Alex Pompez Career

Alex Pompez was born in 1890 in Key West, Florida. He owned and operated a nightclub called the Blue Heaven on Broadway in New York City for many years.

Alex Pompez died of a heart attack at the age of 83 in 1974. Alex Pompez was a pitcher for the New York Cubans from 1946-1950. He had a record of 36-24 and led the team to two American League pennants.

Alex is one of only four pitchers in history to have won 20 or more games in each of his first three seasons, joining Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, and Pedro Martinez. After retiring as a player, he became general manager of the Cuban national baseball team and served in that capacity until 1992.

45. Quincy Trouppe

Quincy Trouppe Career

  • Batting average: .264
  • Hits: 119
  • Home runs: 6
  • Runs batted in: 67
  • Stolen bases: 6
  • Managerial record: 174–140–8
  • 8× All-Star (1938, 1945, 1946–1948²), Negro World Series champion (1945)

Quincy Trouppe was a catcher who played in the Major Leagues for the Cleveland Indians from 1952 to 1952. Quincy Trouppe had a batting average of .264 and hit six home runs in his career.

Quincy Trouppe died on August 10, 1993 at the age of 80 after suffering from heart disease for many years. Quincy Trouppe was a standout player in Negro leagues and Major League Baseball. He had a successful career, batting over .300 in both leagues.

Quincy Trouppe is best known for his time with the Cleveland Buckeyes, where he won two World Series titles.

46. Bud Fowler

Bud Fowler Career

Bud Fowler was a player, manager and scout in the early days of baseball. He played for several teams in his career, but is most famous for being the manager of the Boston Red Sox from 1902 to 1909.

Although he had some success as a manager, Bud Fowler is best known for what he did off the field; namely helping to develop modern scouting techniques and introducing scientific methods to baseball management.

Bud Fowler passed away in 1913 at 54 years old after a long period of illness. Bud Fowler was one of the most popular and successful Negro League players ever. He played in the leagues from 1895 to 1898, and during that time he led his team to two championships.

Fowler was a powerful hitter who could hit for both power and average. In 1896, he hit 38 home runs and drove in 113 RBIs, which is still an all-time record for a Negro League player. After playing in the Negro Leagues, Bud Fowler went on to play Major League Baseball with several different teams including the Boston Americans (1903), Chicago White Sox (1906-1909), Cincinnati Reds (1920) and Philadelphia Phillies (1921).

Bud Fowler was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1992 as part of the first class of African American players, along with Satchel Paige and Josh Gibson

47. Don Newcombe

Don Newcombe Career

  • 4× All-Star (1949–1951, 1955), World Series champion (1955), NL MVP (1956), Cy Young Award (1956), NL Rookie of the Year (1949), MLB wins leader (1956), MLB strikeout leader (1951)

Don Newcombe was an All-Star pitcher in the MLB for eleven seasons. He is best known for his record of 2,356 strikeouts in his career. After retiring from baseball, he became a successful coach and manager at various levels of ball playing.

In 2019, Don Newcombe passed away at the age of 92 after a long illness. Newcombe was one of the most dominant pitchers in baseball history, winning 153 games while leading his teams to 96 victories. He also had a stellar record against Japanese opponents, posting a batting average of .262 and 12 home runs over 54 appearances with the Chunichi Dragons.

As an MLB player, Newcombe was part of three championship teams - 1948-1949 Brooklyn Dodgers (his rookie season), 1954-1958 Cincinnati Reds, and 1958-1960 Cleveland Indians.

48. Sam Jethroe

Sam Jethroe Career

  • NL Rookie of the Year (1950), 2× NL stolen base leader (1950, 1951), 2x Negro American League Batting Champion (1944, 1945), 5x East-West All-Star (1942, 1944-1947), Negro World Series Champion (1945), 3x NAL Stolen Bases Leader

Sam Jethroe was a very talented center fielder in the Major Leagues. He batted .275 and had 105 RBIs in his career. Jethroe played for the Boston Braves from 1950 to 1954, making him one of the longest-tenured players on that team.

After retiring from baseball, Jethreau worked as a scout for various teams until he died at the age of 84 years old in 2001. Sam Jethroe was a four-time Negro American League batting champion and an all-star in both the Negro leagues and Major League Baseball.

Sam Jethroe won the NL Rookie of the Year Award in 1950, becoming one of only two players to ever win this honor while playing for a team other than Boston or Pittsburgh (the other being Sandy Koufax). After leaving baseball following the 1952 season, Sam Jethroe embarked on a successful singing career that lasted until his death in 2006 at age 76.

A six-time All Star recipient, Sam Jethreau was elected to both the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum's inaugural class as a player in 1982.

49. Newt Allen

Newt Allen Career

Newt Allen played Negro League baseball for the Indianapolis Clowns and Homestead Grays from 1920 to 1936. He was a Second Baseman/Manager on the Cincinnati Reds team that won the World Series in 1924, becoming one of only two black managers in major league history (the other being Roy Campanella).

Allen also managed teams in the Mexican League and East Coast Negro leagues during his career. After retiring as a player, he served as president of both the Negro American Baseball Congress (from 1958 to 1962) and Major League Baseball's Committee on Racial Equality (from 1963 to 1969). Allen has been credited with helping improve race relations between black players and white owners during his time as manager of MLB's Reds; subsequently, many African-American players went on to play for white teams after leaving professional baseball underAllen's tutelage or later joined him as coaches or front office personnel within MLB organizations

50. Bingo DeMoss

Bingo DeMoss Career

Bingo DeMoss was a second baseman and manager in the major leagues for over twenty years. He batted right-handed and threw right-handed. DeMoss won three World Series titles with the Giants (1935, 1936, 1938) and one championship with the Dodgers (1945).

Bingo DeMoss is also remembered for his charity work; he served as chairman of the National Committee to Aid War Victims from 1942 until his death in 1965. Bingo DeMoss was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962 Bingo DeMoss was the manager for the Chicago American Giants from 1936 to 1944.

He led the team to two championships in 1937 and 1938. After leaving management, he served as a coach for several teams before retiring in 1963.

51. Minnie Miñoso

Minnie Miñoso Career

  • 2x NgL All-Star (1947–1948), 9× All-Star (1951–1954, 1957, 1959–1960²), Negro World Series champion (1947), 3× Gold Glove Award (1957, 1959, 1960), 3× AL stolen base leader (1951–1953), Chicago White Sox No. 9 retired

Miñoso was a left fielder for the Chicago White Sox from 1949-1980 and is considered one of the greatest hitters in baseball history. Miñoso played in six World Series, winning three (1953, 1956, 1967), and earned MVP honors in 1957.

In his 19-year MLB career, Miñoso hit .299 with 602 home runs and 1,814 RBIs. After retiring as a player, Miñoso served as an executive with the White Sox organization before passing away at 91 years old on March 1st 2015. Minnie Miñoso was one of the most feared sluggers in baseball during his playing days.

He hit for power and average, and earned two All-Star selections. After retiring from MLB play, Minnie went on to have a successful career as a manager and coach.

Final Words

. . The Negro League Baseball was an integral part of the American sports landscape for over half a century. It is often regarded as one of the greatest periods in baseball history, with some of the best players ever to play the game coming from this era.

Some of the most legendary names in MLB history are blackball legends, including Satchel Paige and Jackie Robinson. These players were instrumental in helping to promote equality and integration within professional baseball, paving the way for future generations of athletes who could also reach unprecedented heights.

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