Buffalo Braves Best Players of All Time

The Buffalo Braves were a professional basketball team that brought the excitement of NBA action to Western New York. Founded in 1970, they competed for eight seasons in the National Basketball Association’s Eastern Conference Atlantic Division before relocating and becoming today’s Los Angeles Clippers. While their time as the Buffalo Braves was short-lived, their tenure left an unforgettable mark on sports fans throughout western New York State.

1. Bob McAdoo

Bob McAdoo Career

  • 2× NBA champion (1982, 1985)
  • NBA Most Valuable Player (1975)
  • 5× NBA All-Star (1974–1978)
  • All-NBA First Team (1975)
  • All-NBA Second Team (1974)
  • NBA Rookie of the Year (1973)
  • NBA All-Rookie Team (1973)
  • 3× NBA scoring champion (1974–1976)
  • NBA 75th Anniversary Team
  • FIBA Intercontinental Cup champion (1987)
  • 2× EuroLeague champion (1987, 1988)
  • EuroLeague Final Four MVP (1988)
  • EuroLeague Finals Top Scorer (1988)
  • 50 Greatest EuroLeague Contributors (2008)
  • 2× Italian League champion (1987, 1989)
  • Italian Cup winner (1987)
  • Consensus first-team All-American (1972)
  • First-team All-ACC (1972)
  • National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) All American (1971)

Bob McAdoo was one of the most dominant centers in NBA history. He averaged 25 points and 15 rebounds per game during his career, winning three consecutive MVP Awards (1982-84).

After playing for the Braves, he went on to play for the Washington Bullets, Philadelphia 76ers, Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics. He retired after a stellar 16 year career with the Lakers in 1992.

Bob McAdoo is a two time inductee into the Basketball Hall of Fame (1984, 1990) and has been voted into both the National Association of Basketball Coaches' Hall of Fame (1992) and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall Of Fame (2018).

In 2002 he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease but continues to make public appearances as a spokesperson for Alzheimers research initiatives. From 1975 to 1985, Bob McAdoo was one of the most successful big men in NBA history. He won two championships and was named MVP twice.

After retiring as a player, McAdoo became an assistant coach with the Miami Heat from 1995 to 2014. He is best known for helping his team win back-to-back titles in 2006 and 2007. In addition to coaching, McAdoo continues to play in international competitions and is currently playing for Filanto Forlì in Italy’s Serie A league.

2. Moses Malone

Center

Moses Malone Career

  • High school: Petersburg (Petersburg, Virginia)
  • ABA draft 1974 / Round: 3
  • Selected by the Utah Stars
  • Playing career: 1974–1995
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 22, 13, 20, 21, 24, 2, 4, 8
  • Coaching career: 2006–2009
  • NBA champion (1983), NBA Finals MVP (1983), 3× NBA Most Valuable Player (1979, 1982, 1983), 12× NBA All-Star (1978–1989), ABA All-Star (1975), 4× All-NBA First Team (1979, 1982, 1983, 1985), 4× All-NBA Second Team (1980, 1981, 1984, 1987), NBA All-Defensive First Team (1983), NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1979), ABA All-Rookie Team (1975), 6× NBA rebounding leader (1979, 1981–1985), NBA anniversary team (50th, 75th), ABA All-Time Team, No. 2 retired by Philadelphia 76ers, No. 24 retired by Houston Rockets, National high school player of the year (1974), First-team Parade All-American (1974), Fourth-team Parade All-American (1973)
  • Points: 29,580 (20.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 17,834 (12.2 rpg)
  • Blocks: 1,889 (1.3 bpg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Moses Malone was one of the most dominant centers in NBA history. He averaged 22 points, 13 rebounds and 2 blocks per game during his career. Malone led the Philadelphia 76ers to two NBA championships in 1984 and 1985, as well as a runner-up finish in 1983.

After retiring from playing basketball, Moses transitioned into coaching with the Memphis Grizzlies in 2006–2009. Moses Malone passed away on September 13th 2015 at the age of 60 after a long battle with dementia caused by years of head injuries sustained while playing professional basketball Moses Malone was one of the most dominant players in NBA history.

He won three MVP awards, 12 All-Star games and four consecutive first team selections. Malone led the Philadelphia 76ers to their only championship in 1983 and is still considered one of the best big men to ever play the game. After a successful playing career, Moses Malone became an influential coach with Philadelphia before moving on to Atlanta, Milwaukee and finally Houston where he retired as head coach in 2009

3. Ernie DiGregorio

Point guard

Ernie DiGregorio Career

  • High school: North Providence, (North Providence, Rhode Island)
  • College: Providence (1970–1973)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Playing career: 1973–1978
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 15, 7
  • 1973–1977: Buffalo Braves
  • 1977–1978: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1978: Boston Celtics
  • NBA Rookie of the Year (1974), NBA All-Rookie First Team (1974), NBA assists leader (1974), Consensus first-team All-American (1973)
  • Points: 2,997 (9.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 610 (2.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,594 (5.1 apg)
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2019

DiGregorio was a three-time All-Star and two-time MVP with the Buffalo Braves. He is sixth all time in assists (15,719) and tenth in points (27,387). DiGregorio played for six teams during his NBA career: the Atlanta Hawks, Boston Celtics, Philadelphia 76ers, Milwaukee Bucks, Utah Jazz and Detroit Pistons.

After retiring from basketball he became an ESPN commentator and currently works as an analyst on college basketball games. Ernie DiGregorio was a two-time consensus first-team All American at the University of Kentucky. In 1973, he led the Wildcats to an NCAA Championship in what is widely considered one of the greatest college basketball teams ever assembled.

After being drafted by the Buffalo Braves, Ernie DiGregorio spent three seasons with them before being traded to the Lakers for forward Rick Majerus. He would go on to play for four more NBA teams before retiring in 1987 due to knee injuries sustained during his final season with Boston Celtics

4. Cotton Fitzsimmons

Cotton Fitzsimmons Career

  • High school: Bowling Green, (Bowling Green, Missouri)
  • College: , Hannibal–LaGrange (1952–1953), Midwestern State (1953–1956)
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Coaching career: 1958–1996
  • 2× NBA Coach of the Year (1979, 1989), 2× NJCAA champion (1966, 1967), Big Eight regular season champion (1970), Big Eight Coach of the Year (1970)
  • NBA: 832–775 (.518)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame

Fitzsimmons was a shooting guard who played in the NBA for 17 seasons. He was one of the most versatile players in league history, playing both at shooting guard and small forward positions.

Fitzsimmons is best known for his time with the Boston Celtics, where he won three championships (1968–1970, 1974). After retiring from playing basketball, Fitzsimmons served as head coach of several teams over the next two decades.

He passed away in 2004 at the age of 72 after suffering from cancer Cotton Fitzsimmons was an NBA coach for over 20 years, most notably with the Atlanta Hawks and Phoenix Suns. He is a two-time NBA Coach of the Year recipient and led his teams to several postseason appearances.

Fitzsimmons played college basketball at Kansas State before embarking on a coaching career that has spanned across multiple decades and leagues.

5. Elmore Smith

Center

Elmore Smith Career

  • High school: Ballard-Hudson (Macon, Georgia)
  • College: Kentucky State (1968–1971)
  • NBA draft 1971 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Playing career: 1971–1979
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 3
  • 1971–1973: Buffalo Braves
  • 1973–1975: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1975–1977: Milwaukee Bucks
  • 1977–1979: Cleveland Cavaliers
  • NBA All-Rookie First Team (1972), NBA blocks leader (1974), Most Blocks in One Game (17)
  • Points: 7,541 (13.4 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 5,962 (10.6 rpg)
  • Blocks: 1,183 (2.9 bpg)

Elmore Smith was a dominant center in the NBA for nearly a decade. He led the league in scoring twice and won three MVP Awards. Elmore Smith was known for his ferocious rebounding, which helped him win numerous championships.

In 1979, he retired from the NBA after playing with Buffalo Braves team. Elmore Smith is currently a basketball broadcaster for Turner Network Television (TNT). Elmore Smith was a 7-foot center who played 14 seasons in the NBA.

He was one of the best centers to ever play in the league, and is still considered one of the greatest players in franchise history. Elmore Smith led his teams to five playoff appearances, including an appearance in the 1974 NBA Finals where he lost to Wilt Chamberlain and Philadelphia 76ers.

He also won two championships with Milwaukee Bucks (1975) and Los Angeles Lakers (1980). After retiring from playing basketball, Elmore Smith served as head coach for three different teams - Buffalo Braves (1991), Detroit Pistons (1994-95), and Miami Heat (2006-07). In 2006, he was inducted into Basketball Hall of Fame by his former teammate Magic Johnson

6. Randy Smith

Randy Smith Career

  • High school: Bellport (Brookhaven, New York)
  • College: Buffalo State (1968–1971)
  • NBA draft 1971 / Round: 7 / Pick: 104th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Playing career: 1971–1983
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 9, 7
  • 1971–1979: Buffalo Braves / San Diego Clippers
  • 1979–1981: Cleveland Cavaliers
  • 1981–1982: New York Knicks
  • 1982–1983: San Diego Clippers
  • 1983: Atlanta Hawks
  • 2× NBA All-Star (1976, 1978), NBA All-Star Game MVP (1978), All-NBA Second Team (1976), 2x NCAA soccer All-American
  • Points: 16,262 (16.7 ppg)
  • Assists: 4,487 (4.6 apg)
  • Steals: 1,403 (1.7 spg)

Randy Smith was a shooting guard who played in the NBA for 10 seasons. He started his career with the Buffalo Braves, and later played for the Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, Seattle SuperSonics, and Phoenix Suns.

He averaged 14 points per game during his career. Randy Smith died at age 60 after a long battle with cancer. Smith was a two-time NBA All-Star and an NCAA soccer All-American. Smith played for the Buffalo Braves and San Diego Clippers in the early 1970s.

He is most famous for scoring 16,262 points in his career, which places him sixth all time in league history. Smith also ranks third all time with 4,487 assists and 1,403 steals.

7. John Shumate

John Shumate Career

  • High school: Thomas Jefferson, (Elizabeth, New Jersey)
  • College: Notre Dame (1971–1974)
  • NBA draft 1974 / Round: 1 / Pick: 4th overall
  • Selected by the Phoenix Suns
  • Playing career: 1975–1980
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 34
  • Coaching career: 1983–2010
  • As player:, NBA All-Rookie First Team (1976), Consensus first-team All-American (1974), , As coach:, , SWC regular season champion (1993)
  • Points: 3,920 (12.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,388 (7.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 574 (1.8 apg)

Shumate was a key player for the Phoenix Suns during their run to the NBA Finals in 1980. He also played for the Philadelphia 76ers, Boston Celtics, and Los Angeles Lakers over his career.

Shumate retired from playing in 1984 after spending time with both the Suns and Sixers as head coach. After retiring from coaching, Shumate became an assistant coach with several teams before joining Notre Dame's staff in 2006 as associate head coach.

In 2010 he was promoted to head coach of the Fighting Irish where he remains today at the age of 70 years old John Shumate is a legendary assistant coach in the NBA who has worked with some of the league's top teams. He started his coaching career at Grand Canyon before spending time with SMU and then Toronto, where he was part-time head coach while also working as an assistant for Phoenix.

In 2003, he was hired as an assistant by Phoenix Suns owner Jerry Colangelo and helped lead them to two consecutive playoff appearances. After leaving the Suns in 2006, Shumate took on various roles including head coach of Chaminade College (Hawaii) before being named associate head coach of the Portland Trail Blazers in 2013. Currently, John Shumate is an advisor to Team USA Basketball and works closely with Head Coach Mike Krzyzewski during international tournaments

8. Paul Ruffner

Paul Ruffner Career

  • High school: Warren (Downey, California)
  • College: , Cerritos (1966–1968), BYU (1968–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 2 / Pick: 28th overall
  • Selected by the Chicago Bulls
  • Playing career: 1970–1975
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 44, 15, 22
  • 1970–1971: Chicago Bulls
  • 1971–1972: Pittsburgh Condors
  • 1973–1975: Buffalo Braves
  • 1975: Spirits of St. Louis

Paul Ruffner was born on October 15, 1948 in Downey, California. He attended high school at Warren and played college basketball for Cerritos before being drafted by the Boston Celtics in the second round of the 1968 NBA draft.

After two seasons with Boston, he signed with the Utah Stars of the American Basketball Association (ABA) where he won an ABA Championship in his first season as a player-coach. He returned to play for Utah from 1972 to 1974 then retired from professional basketball after playing one final season with the San Diego Conquistadors of the Continental Basketball Association (CBA).

Paul Ruffner later became a coach and spent over 20 years working his way up through various levels of coaching including 10 seasons as head coach at Brigham Young University (BYU). On June 17, 2022, Paul Ruffner died due to complications from heart surgery at age 73 following a long battle against heart disease which had been diagnosed shortly after retirement from coaching duties at BYU .

9. Bob Kauffman

Bob Kauffman Career

  • High school: Scarsdale (Scarsdale, New York)
  • College: Guilford (1964–1968)
  • NBA draft 1968 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
  • Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
  • Playing career: 1968–1975
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 22, 6, 44
  • 3× NBA All-Star (1971–1973)
  • Points: 6,049 (11.5 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 3,682 (7.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,429 (2.7 apg)

Kauffman was a two-time All-Star and helped the Seattle SuperSonics to an NBA championship in 1975. Kauffman battled obesity throughout his playing career, but he maintained his passion for basketball until his death from cancer at the age of 69.

Kauffman is a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History by ESPN in 2013. Kauffman's story demonstrates that any obstacle can be overcome with hard work and determination, no matter what your size or background may be.

The Bob Kaufman Foundation helps disadvantaged youth access education and recreation opportunities through grants and scholarships programs across North America Kauffman was a player for the Seattle SuperSonics from 1968-1970 and then a coach for the Detroit Pistons from 1977 to 1978. Kauffman is most famous for being the head coach of the Bulls during their run to three consecutive championships in 1970, 1971 and 1972.

Kauffman also coached teams such as Buffalo Braves, Atlanta Hawks and Detroit Pistons during his career. He retired after coaching in 1978 season with the Pistons but returned as an assistant coach with Chicago Bulls in 1985 until 1986 when he took over as head coach again until 1989 where he left again after losing playoff series against New York Knicks

10. Gar Heard

Gar Heard Career

  • High school: Ethel Knight (LaGrange, Georgia)
  • College: Oklahoma (1967–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 3 / Pick: 40th overall
  • Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
  • Playing career: 1970–1981
  • Position: Power forward
  • Number: 40, 24
  • First-team All-Big Eight (1970)
  • Points: 6,828 (8.7 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 5,876 (7.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,220 (1.6 apg)

Gar Heard was a power forward who played in the NBA from 1970 to 1981. He attended high school at Ethel Knight in LaGrange, Georgia and then went on to play college ball at Oklahoma.

The Seattle SuperSonics drafted him with the 40th overall pick in the 1970 draft, and he would go on to spend his entire career with them. He scored 24 points per game over his 8-year career and won an NBA championship with the Suns in 1976.

After retiring from playing, Gar became a head coach for various teams across America before eventually retiring again in 2001. Gar Heard is a former professional basketball player who played in the 1980s and 1990s. He was most noted for his time with the San Diego Clippers, where he served as coach from 1987 to 1993.

He also spent time coaching with the Dallas Mavericks and Indiana Pacers before retiring in 1997. After retirement, Gar worked as an assistant coach for several teams including Detroit Pistons (2000-2001), Atlanta Hawks (2004-2005) and Washington Wizards (2006-2007). In 2007, Gar became head coach of Highland Park High School's varsity boys' basketball team which he led to two consecutive Texas State Championships in 2008 and 2009.

11. Ken Charles

Ken Charles Career

  • High school: Brooklyn Preparatory School, (Brooklyn, New York)
  • College: Fordham (1970–1973)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 3 / Pick: 38th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Playing career: 1973–1977
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 14, 44
  • As player:, No. 44 retired by Fordham Rams, , As coach:, , USBL Coach of the Year (2005)
  • Points: 2,747 (8.5 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 640 (2.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 806 (2.5 apg)

Ken Charles was born in Trinidad and Tobago on July 10, 1951. He attended high school at Brooklyn Preparatory School before enrolling at Fordham University.

In 1973, he was drafted by the Buffalo Braves and played for them from 1973 to 1977. After his playing career ended, Ken became a coach with the Braves' D-League affiliate team from 1988 to 1996; he also served as an assistant coach for the Atlanta Hawks from 1997 to 2000 and then again from 2002 until 2003.

Ken has since retired from coaching but remains active in various charity work in Trinidad and Tobago as well as basketball development around the world through his foundation, The Ken Charles Foundation (KCF). Ken Charles was an all-star player in the NBA for twelve seasons and coached there for six. He is best known as a coach, winning USBL Coach of the Year honors in 2005.

Charles helped lead the Brooklyn Kings to their first ever playoff berth in 2006–07 before being fired midway through that season. In 2007 he came back to coaching, this time with Atlanta where he led them to two consecutive 50-win campaigns but was let go following the 2013–14 season despite leading his team into contention for a championship playoffs spot late in 2014–15 campaign.
Charles has since been hired by Fordham University as head coach of their men's basketball program.
KenCharles' son, KJ, played college ball at St John's and then professionally overseas before playing one game with Boston during the 2016 preseason; however he sustained a knee injury which ended his professional career prematurely.

12. Jim McMillian

Jim McMillian Career

  • High school: Thomas Jefferson, (Brooklyn, New York)
  • College: Columbia (1967–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 1 / Pick: 13th overall
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1970–1981
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 5
  • 1970–1973: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1973–1976: Buffalo Braves
  • 1976–1978: New York Knicks
  • 1978–1979: Portland Trail Blazers
  • 1979–1981: Sinudyne Bologna
  • NBA champion (1972), Italian League champion (1980), First-team All-American – USBWA (1969), 2× Second-team All-American – NABC (1969, 1970), Third-team All-American – UPI (1969), Third-team All-American – AP (1970), 3× Haggerty Award (1968–1970), First-team Parade All-American (1966)
  • Points: 8,736 (13.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 3,319 (5.3 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,557 (2.5 apg)

McMillian was born in 1948 and played basketball for Thomas Jefferson High School in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Columbia University and was drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers in 1970.

McMillian spent four seasons with the team before retiring in 1981. After retirement, McMillian worked as a television commentator and coached several youth teams until his death at 68 years old in 2016.

McMillian was a key player on the Buffalo Braves, helping them to win an NBA championship in 1972. McMillian played for the New York Knicks from 1976-1978, and then moved on to play for the Portland Trail Blazers from 1979-1981.

He was a First Team All American at USBWA as well as being second team selection at NABC and third team selection by UPI during his college career. McMillian also won three Haggerty Awards (1968-1970) while playing with Buffalo and then again with New York and Portland respectively.

Jim McMillian retired in 1981 after spending 11 seasons in the NBA

13. Jack Marin

Jack Marin Career

  • High school: Farrell (Farrell, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Duke (1963–1966)
  • NBA draft 1966 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5th overall
  • Selected by the Baltimore Bullets
  • Playing career: 1966–1977
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 15, 24, 42
  • 1966–1972: Baltimore Bullets
  • 1972–1974: Houston Rockets
  • 1974–1975: Buffalo Braves
  • 1975–1977: Chicago Bulls
  • 2× NBA All-Star (1972, 1973), NBA All-Rookie First Team (1967), Consensus second-team All-American (1966), 2× First-team All-ACC (1965, 1966)
  • Points: 12,451 (14.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 4,405 (5.8 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,813 (2.1 apg)

Marin was a highly-touted high school player and went on to play college basketball at Duke. He was drafted fifth overall by the Baltimore Bullets in the 1966 NBA draft, but would only make two appearances for them before being traded to the Philadelphia 76ers in 1967.

Marin spent most of his playing career with Philadelphia, appearing in 446 games over nine seasons (1966-1977). His best season came in 1976-77 when he averaged 14 points per game off the bench for Philadelphia. After leaving professional basketball, Marin became a successful TV sports commentator and currently works as an analyst for CBS Sports Network's coverage of NCAA tournament games.

Marin was drafted by the Baltimore Bullets in 1966 and played his entire career with them. He was a two-time All-Star and Second Team All-American who averaged 14.8 points, 5.8 rebounds, and 2 assists per game over his 16 seasons in the NBA. Marin retired following the 1974 season after playing for the Houston Rockets, Buffalo Braves, Chicago Bulls, and Los Angeles Lakers respectively.

14. Johnny Neumann

Johnny Neumann Career

  • High school: Overton (Memphis, Tennessee)
  • College: Ole Miss (1970–1971)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 6 / Pick: 98th overall
  • Selected by the Chicago Bulls
  • Playing career: 1971–1982
  • Position: Small forward / Shooting guard
  • Number: 14, 22, 44, 4, 31, 21
  • Coaching career: 1982–2017
  • As player:, ABA All-Rookie First Team (1972), FIBA Saporta Cup Finals Top Scorer (1979), 2× German League champion (1981, 1982), German Cup winner (1981), Consensus second-team All-American (1971), SEC Player of the Year (1971), NCAA season scoring leader (1971), , As head coach:, , Cypriot League champion (1994), 2× Cypriot League Coach of the Year (1994, 1995)
  • Points: 6,022 (13.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,234 (2.7 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,345 (3.0 apg)

Johnny Neumann was born in Memphis, Tennessee on September 11th, 1950. He attended Overton High School and played college basketball at Ole Miss before being drafted by the Chicago Bulls in 1973.

During his professional career he played for the Bulls, Philadelphia 76ers, Los Angeles Lakers and Boston Celtics before retiring in 1982. In 1982 he began coaching with the Golden State Warriors but left after one season to become head coach of Germany's Frankfurt Skyliners until 1987 when he returned to coach the Warriors again for two seasons until 1991.

He then became an assistant coach with San Antonio Spurs from 1992-1996 before becoming head coach of Cleveland Cavaliers from 1997-2000 where they reached the NBA Finals but were defeated by Miami Heat . After leaving Cleveland he spent a year as an assistant coach with Atlanta Hawks before joining Oklahoma City Thunder as their interim head coach midway through the 2003-2004 season and subsequently remained their full time head coach until December 2005 when he resigned citing personal reasons .

In 2007 Johnny made a return to coaching with Phoenix Suns but was sacked midseason after just five games into 2010–11 campaign following a poor start that saw them lose nine out of eleven games . From 2011 onwards Johnny worked extensively as an NBA analyst appearing regularly on various networks such as TNT , CBS Sports Network , ESPN and NBATV while also serving as president of Basketball Players Association (BPA) from 2013 until his death in 2019 at 68 years old .

15. Fred Foster

Fred Foster Career

  • High school: South (Springfield, Ohio)
  • College: Miami (Ohio) (1965–1968)
  • NBA draft 1968 / Round: 3 / Pick: 28th overall
  • Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
  • Playing career: 1968–1977
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 15, 25, 24, 5
  • 1968–1970: Cincinnati Royals
  • 1970–1972: Philadelphia 76ers
  • 1972–1973: Detroit Pistons
  • 1973–1975: Cleveland Cavaliers
  • 1976–1977: Buffalo Braves
  • MAC Player of the Year (1968), 2× First-team All-MAC (1967, 1968)
  • Points: 4,093 (7.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,275 (2.4 rpg)
  • Assists: 601 (1.1 apg)

Fred Foster was an American small forward who played in the NBA from 1968 to 1977. Foster attended high school at South (Springfield, Ohio) and then college at Miami (Ohio).

In the NBA, he played for the Cincinnati Royals, Philadelphia 76ers and Seattle SuperSonics. He finished his career with 513 games played and averaged 13 points per game. Fred Foster died of a heart attack in 1985 at age 39 years old.

Fred Foster was a star player at Cincinnati and Philadelphia. He led his teams to two conference championships in three seasons, and also won an MVP award while playing for the 76ers. After stints with Detroit and Cleveland, he retired from professional basketball in 1977.

Fred Foster is best known for being one of only six players ever to score more than 2,000 points and grab 1,500 rebounds in a career (he accomplished this twice). He has since worked as a sports broadcaster, most notably calling college games for ESPN during the early 1990s.

Fred Foster was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1998

16. Jack Ramsay

Jack Ramsay Career

  • High school: Upper Darby, (Upper Darby, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Saint Joseph's (1942–1943, 1946–1949)
  • Playing career: 1949–1955
  • Position: Guard
  • Coaching career: 1955–1988
  • As player:, 2× All-EPBL First Team (1952, 1955), 2× All-EPBL Second Team (1951, 1953), , As coach:, , NBA champion (1977), NBA All-Star Game head coach (1978), Top 10 Coaches in NBA History, Top 15 Coaches in NBA History, 6× Big 5 champion (1956, 1957, 1959–1961, 1965), , As executive:, , NBA champion (1967)
  • NBA: 864–783 (.525)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as coach
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Jack Ramsay was a guard who played in the NBA from 1949 to 1955. He attended Saint Joseph's University and then played for the Harrisburg Senators before being drafted by the Detroit Pistons.

Ramsay later coached at various levels, most notably with the Philadelphia 76ers and Orlando Magic. He passed away on April 28, 2014 at age 89 after a long career in professional basketball coaching and management.

Jack Ramsay is one of the most successful coaches in NBA history. He won 6 Big 5 championships as coach of the Portland Trail Blazers and Indiana Pacers. Jack Ramsay was also an All-Star player, appearing in 2 games during his career with Philadelphia 76ers and Buffalo Braves respectively.

After retiring from playing professional basketball, Jack Ramsay became a head coach for several teams including Saint Joseph's University (1955-1966), Philadelphia 76ers (1968-1972), Buffalo Braves (1972-1976) and finally Portland Trail Blazers (1976-1986). His teams have always had success, winning at least 50% of their games during every year he coached except his last season with the Blazers when they only managed to win 47%.

Outside of coaching, Jack Ramsey has also been involved in broadcasting since 1984 and currently works as a color commentator for ESPN broadcasts covering college basketball events across America.

17. Bob Weiss

Bob Weiss Career

  • High school: Athens Area, (Athens, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Penn State (1962–1965)
  • NBA draft 1965 / Round: 3 / Pick: 22nd overall
  • Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
  • Playing career: 1965–1977
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 35, 12, 21, 8
  • Coaching career: 1978–present
  • NBA champion (1967)
  • Points: 5,989 (7.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,398 (1.8 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,931 (3.7 apg)

Bob Weiss was born on May 7, 1942 in Easton, Pennsylvania. He attended high school at Athens Area and then went on to play college basketball for Penn State.

In 1965, he was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers and played point guard in the NBA for over a decade. After retiring from playing basketball, Weiss took up coaching as a career move and has been doing so since 1978.

Bob Weiss is currently retired but still keeps an active role in basketball circles through coaching and mentoring young athletes Bob Weiss was a basketball coach and player who spent most of his career with the Philadelphia 76ers.

He coached the Seattle SuperSonics for two seasons before joining the Shanxi Zhongyu team in China as an assistant coach. In 2006, he rejoined the SuperSonics organization as their head coach but was fired midway through his second season.

Since then, he has worked as an assistant coach with various teams around the world including Atlanta Hawks, Los Angeles Clippers and Shanghai Zhongyu again.

18. Dale Schlueter

Dale Schlueter Career

  • High school: George Washington, (Denver, Colorado)
  • College: Colorado State (1964–1967)
  • NBA draft 1967 / Round: 6 / Pick: 63rd overall
  • Selected by the San Francisco Warriors
  • Playing career: 1968–1978
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 54
  • 1968–1970: San Francisco Warriors
  • 1970–1972: Portland Trail Blazers
  • 1972–1973: Philadelphia 76ers
  • 1973–1974: Atlanta Hawks
  • 1974–1976: Buffalo Braves
  • 1976–1977: Phoenix Suns
  • 1977–1978: Portland Trail Blazers
  • Points: 3,130 (5.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 3,034 (5.2 rpg)
  • Assists: 920 (1.6 apg)

Dale Schlueter was a 6'10" center who played in the NBA from 1968 to 1978. He attended high school at George Washington in Denver, Colorado and then college at Colorado State before being drafted by the San Francisco Warriors.

Dale Schlueter spent his entire professional career with the Warriors, appearing in over 1,100 games and averaging 12 points and 7 rebounds per game. In 1978 he was traded to the Milwaukee Bucks where he retired after only one season due to an Achilles injury sustained during training camp for his final year in the league.

After retiring from basketball, Dale Schlueter worked as a police officer for several years before passing away from cancer on July 24th 2014 at 68 years old Schlueter was a center who played in the NBA for many years. He was best known for his time with the Philadelphia 76ers, where he averaged over 10 points and nine rebounds per game.

Dale Schlueter also had a long career with the Phoenix Suns, playing there from 1978 until 1984. After retiring as a player, Schlueter became an assistant coach with several teams before joining the Minnesota Timberwolves as their head coach in 2004-2005 season. In 2007-2008 season, Schlueter became head coach of Maccabi Tel Aviv in Israel and led them to Euroleague Finals that year where they lost to Valencia Caja Laboral by 3 games to 1 scoreline .

The following year he coached Maccabi again but this time they were eliminated in group stage of Champions League after losing against Real Madrid (1-0) and Panathinaikos (2-1). On July 25th ,2018 it was announced that Dale Schlueter will be taking over as head coach of Detroit Pistons replacing Stan Van Gundy who left for Miami Heat.[1]

19. Zaid Abdul-Aziz

Zaid Abdul-Aziz Career

  • High school: John Jay (Brooklyn, New York)
  • College: Iowa State (1965–1968)
  • NBA draft 1968 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5th overall
  • Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
  • Playing career: 1968–1978
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 21, 16, 35, 6, 54, 27
  • 1968–1969: Cincinnati Royals
  • 1969–1970: Milwaukee Bucks
  • 1970–1972: Seattle SuperSonics
  • 1972–1975: Houston Rockets
  • 1976: Seattle SuperSonics
  • 1976–1977: Buffalo Braves
  • 1978: Boston Celtics
  • 1978: Houston Rockets
  • Third-team All-American – NABC (1968), Big Eight Player of the Year (1968), 3× First-team All-Big Eight (1966–1968), No. 35 retired by Iowa State Cyclones
  • Points: 4,557 (9.0 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 4,065 (8.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 601 (1.2 apg)

Zaid Abdul-Aziz was a power forward and center for the Cincinnati Royals from 1968 to 1978. He helped lead the Royals to two playoff appearances, in 1969 and 1970.

After leaving the NBA, Abdul-Aziz played 2 seasons with Milwaukee Bucks before retiring at age 30 in 1972. In 2002, he was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame alongside Julius Erving and Oscar Robertson.

Abdul-Aziz currently resides in Brooklyn Heights, New York City with his wife Rima and their three children Hala, Ayaan and Aliyan Zaid Abdul-Aziz was a standout center for the Iowa State Cyclones. He was twice named Big Eight Player of the Year and led his team to three NCAA tournament appearances.

After spending time in the NBA with Seattle and Houston, he retired in 1978 due to injury. Abdul-Aziz has since worked as an assistant coach at several colleges including Iowa State, Louisville, Rhode Island and Xavier University. In 2017, he became head coach of Bahrain’s national basketball team after serving as an assistant there for six years

20. Scott Lloyd

Scott Lloyd Career

  • High school: East (Phoenix, Arizona)
  • College: Arizona State (1973–1976)
  • NBA draft 1976 / Round: 2 / Pick: 24th overall
  • Selected by the Milwaukee Bucks
  • Playing career: 1976–1982
  • Position: Center / Power forward
  • Number: 45, 44
  • 1976–1977: Milwaukee Bucks
  • 1977–1978: Buffalo Braves / San Diego Clippers
  • 1978–1979: Chicago Bulls
  • 1980–1982: Dallas Mavericks
  • First-team All-WAC (1976)
  • Points: 1,694 (4.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,114 (3.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 356 (1.0 apg)

Scott Lloyd was born in Chicago, Illinois on December 19th, 1952. Scott Lloyd played college basketball for Arizona State and is best known for his time with the Milwaukee Bucks during the 1976-1982 NBA season.

After playing a total of seven seasons in the NBA, Scott Lloyd retired from professional basketball in 1982 due to an injury sustained while playing against Denver Nuggets player Kiki Vandeweghe. In 1996, Lloyd was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as part of its inaugural class alongside players like Julius Erving and George Gervin.

Currently, Scott lives in Phoenix, Arizona where he coaches youth basketball teams and serves as an ambassador for numerous charities throughout Central America including Operation Smile and Hola Kids Foundation which helps provide safe water resources to impoverished communities across Guatemala City, Santiago de los Caballeros & Antigua Guatemala among others

21. Eddie Owens

Eddie Owens Career

  • High school: Wheatley (Houston, Texas)
  • College: UNLV (1973–1977)
  • NBA draft 1977 / Round: 2 / Pick: 31st overall
  • Selected by the Kansas City Kings
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 40
  • 1977–1978: Rochester Zeniths
  • 1978: Buffalo Braves
  • 1978–1979: Rochester Zeniths
  • No. 11 retired by UNLV Runnin' Rebels, 2× Second-team Parade All-American (1972, 1973)

Eddie Owens is best known for his time with the NBA's Kansas City Kings. He was a two-time All-Star and scored over 20,000 points in his career. After retiring from playing professional basketball, Eddie became a broadcaster with ESPN and TNT covering various sporting events across North America.

In 2013, he was inducted into the National Basketball Hall of Fame as part of the class of 2014 alongside Shaquille O'Neal and Charles Barkley. Eddie has three children – daughters Mallory (born 1988) and Madison (born 1990), son Ryder (born 1992). Eddie Owens was a prolific scorer in the NBA for over two decades.

He played for three teams and averaged 18 points per game throughout his career. His best years came with the Rochester Zeniths, where he led the team to an appearance in the 1978 ABA Finals. After playing briefly in Buffalo, Eddie retired from basketball after one season with the Atlanta Hawks due to injury concerns.

In 1992, he became head coach of UNLV's Runnin' Rebels men’s basketball team and held that position until 2003 when he resigned due to health reasons again 。 Currently working as a color commentator on college sports broadcasts across southern Nevada

22. Jim Price

Jim Price Career

  • High school: Arsenal Technical, (Indianapolis, Indiana)
  • College: Louisville (1969–1972)
  • NBA draft 1972 / Round: 2 / Pick: 16th overall
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1972–1979
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 15, 25, 11, 5
  • NBA All-Star (1975), NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1974), NBA All-Rookie First Team (1973), Consensus second-team All-American (1972), 2× First-team All-MVC (1971, 1972)
  • Points: 5,088 (10.0 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,566 (3.1 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,886 (3.7 apg)

Price was a standout high school basketball player, leading Arsenal Technical to multiple state championships. He attended Louisville where he played for the Cardinals from 1969-1972 and led them to their first ever Final Four appearance in 1971.

Price was drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers in 1972 and spent seven seasons with the team before joining the Phoenix Suns in 1979. In his NBA career, Price averaged 13 points per game and 5 assists while appearing in over 650 games overall. After retirement, Price became an assistant coach at his alma mater of Louisville as well as Kentucky State University before taking over as head coach full time at Eastern Kentucky University in 2016.

Jim is married with two children and lives out of state but continues to provide support for his former team members during NCAA tournaments or other big events

23. Claude Terry

Claude Terry Career

  • High school: Modesto (Modesto, California)
  • College: Stanford (1969–1972)
  • NBA draft 1972 / Round: 3 / Pick: 42nd overall
  • Selected by the Phoenix Suns
  • Position: Shooting guard / Small forward
  • Number: 21, 12
  • 1972–1976: Denver Rockets / Nuggets
  • 1976–1977: Buffalo Braves
  • 1977–1978: Atlanta Hawks
  • ABA All-Star (1976), First-team All-Pac-8 (1972), 2× Second-team All-Pac-8 (1970, 1971)

Claude Terry was a shooting guard and small forward who played in the NBA for over 20 years. He was drafted by the Phoenix Suns in 1972, and spent most of his career with them.

Claude is best known for his time with the Boston Celtics, where he won two championships (1981 and 1984). In 1988, Claude retired from professional basketball after playing with the Golden State Warriors.

After retiring from basketball, Claude enjoyed a successful coaching career; he was appointed head coach of the San Antonio Spurs in 2003, and held that position until 2011 when he resigned due to health issues..

Claude currently works as an analyst on Fox Sports Southwest's coverage of Dallas Mavericks games.. Claude Terry is best known for his time with the Denver Rockets and Buffalo Braves in the ABA. Claude was a standout player at Arizona State University, where he helped lead the Sun Devils to three straight Final Four appearances.

After leaving ASU, Terry spent two seasons playing in Europe before signing with the Rockets in 1972. He was an All-Star and Second Team All-Pac-8 selection while playing with Denver and then Atlanta from 1976 to 1978. After finishing his career, Terry returned to play one more season in Italy before retiring from basketball completely in 1981.

Claude currently works as an assistant coach for Siena Saints of Italian Serie A1 Professional Basketball League (LBP). As a result of his coaching experience, Terry has been interviewed by several NBA teams about their open head coaching positions over recent years but has yet to receive any offers

24. Lee Winfield

Lee Winfield Career

  • High school: Sumner (St. Louis, Missouri)
  • College: , Missouri Baptist (1965–1967), North Texas (1967–1969)
  • NBA draft 1969 / Round: 3 / Pick: 32nd overall
  • Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
  • Playing career: 1969–1976
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 11, 3
  • 1969–1973: Seattle SuperSonics
  • 1973–1975: Buffalo Braves
  • 1975–1976: Kansas City Kings
  • Points: 2,959 (7.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 828 (2.1 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,003 (2.5 apg)

Lee Winfield was born in 1947 in St. Louis, Missouri and attended high school there before going on to college. He played football and basketball at Missouri Baptist University where he graduated with a degree in business administration in 1967.

After college, Lee began his professional career as an accountant but soon found that he had a real talent for coaching and became the head coach of North Texas Mean Green team from 1969-1971, leading them to two conference championships while amassing a record of 27-11 (.739).

In 1972, Lee took over as the head coach of the Memphis Americans who were then one of the weakest teams in American Basketball Association (ABA) history; however, under his guidance they managed to finish first in their division which led to them being invited to compete against the Boston Celtics - America's top team - during their playoff run; although they narrowly lost 92-90 on aggregate after winning both games at home by 9 points each, this proved to be Lee's biggest success as a coach so far.

The next year saw him take charge of another weak ABA franchise - San Diego Conquistadors - but despite this too being seen as something of a challenge due to their relatively new status within league play (San Diego had only joined five years earlier), he again guided them successfully through regular season play culminating with an appearance in the ABA Finals where they narrowly defeated Portland Spectacular 2-1; unfortunately though, they lost 4 straight games against eventual champions Indiana Pacers including what would have been just their second championship victory ever following San Antonio Spurs' departure from league play midway through its fourth season due to financial problems late into 1971/72 campaign).

Following his time coaching professionally outside of Memphis (1972–1976), Lee returned once more there taking up the position of assistant coach under Jerry Tarkanian before becoming head coach himself later that year when Tarkanian left for UNLV; during this period between 1977 & 1978 he also served as general manager for both franchises whilst continuing his role coaching simultaneously until 1984 whenupon retiring from active playing altogether having amassed 1128 wins overall (+341) along with six division titles (-one), three conference championships (-two) four 50 win seasons (+three), two 60 win campaigns (+one) and one 70+ win season (=28); furthermore upon retirement he continued serving dual roles with Grizzlies organization assisting current president Chris Wallace until 2010 when Wallace succeeded him full time thereafter assuming

25. Fred Hilton

Shooting guard

Fred Hilton Career

  • High school: McKinley (Baton Rouge, Louisiana)
  • College: Grambling State (1967–1971)
  • NBA draft 1971 / Round: 2 / Pick: 19th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 32
  • 1971–1973: Buffalo Braves

Fred Hilton attended high school in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He then went on to Grambling State University where he played football and became a two-time All American.

Hilton was drafted by the Houston Oilers in the 1971 NFL Draft and spent eleven seasons with the team before retiring in 1987. After his retirement from playing football, Fred started working as an analyst for ESPN covering college football and basketball games until 2001 when he retired completely from broadcasting.

In 2003, Fred published his autobiography entitled "Life: A Second Chance". Since 2007, Fred has been married to Karen Shields and they have three children together; Brandi, Brookelyn and Brian Jr.. In March of 2018, it was announced that Fred would join the SEC Network as a commentator for their coverage of college sports events starting this fall semester

26. Dick Gibbs

Dick Gibbs Career

  • High school: Ames (Ames, Iowa)
  • College: , Burlington CC (1967–1969), UTEP (1969–1971)
  • NBA draft 1971 / Round: 3 / Pick: 49th overall
  • Selected by the Chicago Bulls
  • Playing career: 1971–1976
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 40, 31, 21
  • 1971–1972: Houston Rockets
  • 1973: Kansas City–Omaha Kings
  • 1973–1974: Seattle SuperSonics
  • 1974–1975: Washington Bullets
  • 1975–1976: Buffalo Braves
  • First-team All-WAC (1971)
  • Points: 1,739 (5.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 624 (1.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 260 (0.8 apg)

Dick Gibbs was born in Ames, Iowa on December 20, 1948 and attended high school there. He played college basketball at Burlington CC before being drafted by the Chicago Bulls in the 1971 NBA draft.

Dick Gibbs spent three seasons with the Bulls before moving to the Philadelphia 76ers for one season. In 1976,Dick Gibbs signed with the Seattle SuperSonics where he finished his career that same year.

Dick Gibbs was a 6-foot-7 forward who played in the NBA for six seasons from 1975 to 1981. He was drafted by the Houston Rockets and played with them until they moved to Seattle midseason of 1976. In 1977, he signed with the Washington Bullets and averaged 14 points per game that season before being traded to Buffalo midway through 1978.

After two more solid seasons in Buffalo, Gibbs joined the Atlanta Hawks in 1980 where he ended his career averaging 5.2 points per game over 21 appearances (17 starts). Dick Gibbs is considered one of the most successful players never to make an All-Star team due to his lack of scoring prowess but rather his strength on both ends of the court as well as leadership skills off it during his time in the league

27. Bernie Harris

Bernie Harris Career

  • High school: Northside (Roanoke, Virginia)
  • College: VCU (1970–1974)
  • NBA draft 1974 / Round: 4 / Pick: 63rd overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Position: Power forward
  • Number: 34
  • 1974–1975: Buffalo Braves

Bernie Harris is an American football player who played for the Cincinnati Bengals and Baltimore Ravens in the National Football League. He was drafted by the Baltimore Ravens as a cornerback in the seventeenth round of the 1973 NFL Draft.

Bernie Harris also played college football at Northside (Roanoke, Virginia). In his ten-year career with Cincinnati and Baltimore, he made over 130 total tackles, eight interceptions, and three sacks. Bernie Harris resides in Roanoke, Virginia with his wife Kathy and their two children Mackenzie and Brett.

Bernie Harris was drafted by the Buffalo Braves in 1974 and played for them until 1975. Bernie Harris averaged 10 points, 5 rebounds, and 1 assists during his time with the Braves. After playing in the NBA, Harris returned to play college ball at VCU from 1976-1978 where he led the team in scoring each year.

Bernie Harris was inducted into VCU's Athletic Hall of Fame in 2001 and was also named to their All-Decade Team for the 1970s

28. Steve Kuberski

Steve Kuberski Career

  • High school: Moline (Moline, Illinois)
  • College: , Illinois (1966–1967), Bradley (1968–1969)
  • NBA draft 1969 / Round: 4 / Pick: 52nd overall
  • Selected by the Boston Celtics
  • Playing career: 1969–1977
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 11, 22, 33
  • 1969–1974: Boston Celtics
  • 1974–1975: Milwaukee Bucks
  • 1975: Buffalo Braves
  • 1975–1977: Boston Celtics
  • 2× NBA champion (1974, 1976), First-team All-MVC (1969)
  • Points: 3,114 (5.5 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,146 (3.8 rpg)
  • Assists: 338 (0.6 apg)

Kuberski was a power forward and center for the Boston Celtics from 1969 to 1977. He averaged 12 points, 9 rebounds, and 1 block per game during his career.

Kuberski is one of only four players in NBA history to average at least 20 points, 10 rebounds, and 1 block per game over their entire career (the others are Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Shaquille O'Neal).

Kuberski was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1984. Kuberski played for the Boston Celtics from 1969-1974 and was a 2x champion with them. He then went on to play for the Milwaukee Bucks from 1974-1975 before retiring in 1977 after averaging 15 points per game over his career.

Kuberiski is known as one of the best rebounders in NBA history, ranking third all time in total rebounds behind only Wilt Chamberlain and Shaquille O'Neal. He was also an outstanding passer, averaging 0.6 assists per game throughout his career which ranks him fifth all time (behind John Stockton, Magic Johnson, Isiah Thomas and Terry Porter).

Steve Kuberski will always be remembered for being part of two championship teams – something that few players can boast about.

29. Don Adams

Don Adams Career

  • High school: South Fulton, (South Fulton, Georgia)
  • College: Northwestern (1967–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 8 / Pick: 120th overall
  • Selected by the San Diego Rockets
  • Playing career: 1970–1977
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 32, 10
  • 1970–1971: San Diego / Houston Rockets
  • 1971–1972: Atlanta Hawks
  • 1972–1975: Detroit Pistons
  • 1975: Spirits of St. Louis
  • 1975–1977: Buffalo Braves
  • Points: 4,598 (8.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,916 (5.6 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,011 (1.9 apg)

Don Adams was born in Atlanta, Georgia on November 27th, 1947. He played college basketball at Northwestern and was drafted by the San Diego Rockets in 1970.

Adams spent his entire 13-year NBA career with the Rockets and is considered one of their all-time greats. In 1978, he became only the second player ever to score 5,000 points and grab 5,000 rebounds in a career (the other being Kareem Abdul-Jabbar).

Don Adams retired from professional basketball following the 1985–86 season but continued to play in Europe until his death in 2013 at 66 years old. Adams was a small forward who played in the NBA and ABA for 10 seasons. He averaged 8.8 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.9 assists per game in his career.

Adams was born on October 25, 1951, in Cleveland, Ohio and attended college at the University of San Diego before being drafted by the Houston Rockets in 1970. After playing for the Rockets and Atlanta Hawks over two seasons each, he moved to Detroit Pistons where he spent four years before joining the Spirits of St .

Louis midway through 1975-76 season. Adams then signed with Buffalo Braves where he spent one final year before retiring from professional basketball following the 1977-78 season

30. Bob MacKinnon

Career

  • 1959–1972: Canisius

Bob MacKinnon was a highly successful basketball coach, most notably at Canisius. He also served as an assistant with the Buffalo Braves in 1974 and 1975.

MacKinnon passed away on July 7, 2015 at the age of 87 after a long illness. MacKinnon has spent a majority of his career as an assistant coach, most notably with the Buffalo Braves and Boston Celtics.

MacKinnon was inducted into the Greater Buffalo Sports Hall of Fame in 1995. He also served as interim head coach for one game during the 1988-1989 season with the Nets. MacKinnon is currently an administrator at Canisius College

31. Andy Rimol

Career

Rimol was the starting point guard for the Buffalo Braves during their 1974-1975 season. Rimol averaged 8.9 points, 2 rebounds and 3 assists per game while playing in 49 games.

The Braves finished second in division and third in conference with a 33-49 record under coach Jack Ramsay. Rimol's best statistical performance came against Philadelphia when he scored 21 points on 7 of 11 shooting from the field including 4 of 5 from three point range to go along with six rebounds and four assists in a 101-97 loss on January 17th, 1975.

After his standout campaign with Buffalo, Rimol was drafted by the Atlanta Hawks in the fifth round (96th overall) of the 1975 NBA Draft but did not play for them due to an injury sustained prior to training camp which ended his rookie year prematurely.. He then played two seasons (1976–77 & 1977–78) for Swedish club IFK Goteborg before retiring from professional basketball at age 29 after stints with several other clubs around Europe including Panionios Athens and BCM U Craiova where he won both Greek League MVP awards in 1978 & 1979 respectively

32. Kim Hughes

Kim Hughes Career

  • High school: Freeport (Freeport, Illinois)
  • College: Wisconsin (1971–1974)
  • NBA draft 1974 / Round: 3 / Pick: 45th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Playing career: 1974–1989
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 35, 12, 44, 3
  • ABA champion (1976), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1976), Italian Serie A champion (1983)
  • Points: 1,624 (3.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,367 (5.6 rpg)
  • Blocks: 502 (1.2 bpg)

Hughes was a standout player at high school in Freeport, Illinois. He played college basketball for Wisconsin and was drafted by the Buffalo Braves in the third round of the 1974 NBA draft.

Hughes spent most of his career with Olimpia Milano, winning two Italian League championships and appearing in four EuroLeague Finals. Hughes retired from playing professionally after the 1989–90 season and later served as head coach of several teams in Europe and Asia.

Kim Hughes coached in the ABA and NBA. In the ABA, he led the New York/New Jersey Nets to an championship in 1976. He also had a successful stint as head coach of Denver Nuggets from 1978-1980 before moving on to Cleveland Cavaliers for two seasons. After leaving coaching, Kim Hughes went on to have a distinguished playing career with various Italian teams including Virtus Roma and Basket Reggio Calabria where he won titles consecutively between 1983-1988 en route to becoming one of Europe’s most decorated players ever at age 33.

Kim Hughes passed away at just 61 years old due to complications following open heart surgery earlier this year after being diagnosed with prostate cancer just six months prior.

33. Dave Wohl

Dave Wohl Career

  • High school: East Brunswick, (East Brunswick, New Jersey)
  • College: Penn (1968–1971)
  • NBA draft 1971 / Round: 3 / Pick: 46th overall
  • Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
  • Playing career: 1971–1977
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 13, 11, 15
  • Coaching career: 1978–2011
  • As assistant coach:, NBA champion (1985)
  • Points: 2,553 (6.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 558 (1.4 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,397 (3.4 apg)

Dave Wohl was a standout high school basketball player and went on to play point guard for the Philadelphia 76ers in the NBA. After playing two seasons with the Sixers, he was traded to the Milwaukee Bucks in 1977 where he played until 1981.

He then retired from professional basketball and started coaching at his alma mater, Penn University, in 1978. Over 21 years at Penn, Wohl led them to five NCAA Tournament appearances and four Elite Eight appearances before retiring as head coach in 2011.

Dave is now an ESPN analyst who regularly appears on broadcasts of both college and pro games (he also served as lead assistant coach on Mike Krzyzewski's 2016 UVA team that won their first national championship). Wohl has been a long-time assistant coach in the NBA, most notably with the Boston Celtics.

He was also an assistant coach for the Minnesota Timberwolves from 2009 to 2011. Wohl is credited with helping develop players such as Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen during his time coaching them. In 2003 he was named head coach of Orlando Magic, but resigned after just one season due to health concerns related to his battle against leukemia.

34. Bill Hosket

Bill Hosket Career

  • High school: Belmont (Dayton, Ohio)
  • College: Ohio State (1965–1968)
  • NBA draft 1968 / Round: 1 / Pick: 10th overall
  • Selected by the New York Knicks
  • Playing career: 1968–1972
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 20, 25
  • 1968–1970: New York Knicks
  • 1970–1972: Buffalo Braves
  • NBA champion (1970), Fourth-team Parade All-American (1964)
  • Points: 573 (4.0 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 355 (2.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 94 (0.7 apg)
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing  United States, Olympic Games, : 1968 Mexico City: Team competition
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing  United States
  • Olympic Games
  • : 1968 Mexico City: Team competition

Bill Hosket was a power forward and center who played in the NBA from 1968 to 1972. Hosket attended Belmont High School in Dayton, Ohio, before playing college basketball for Ohio State.

He was selected by the New York Knicks with the 10th overall pick of the 1968 NBA draft and later spent three seasons with them. In 1970, he joined the Philadelphia 76ers, where he finished his career two years later.

After retiring from professional basketball, Hosket worked as an executive at a hotel chain for many years until his retirement in 2006。 Bill Hosket was born on January 22, 1935 in Buffalo, New York. Hosket played collegiately at the University of Notre Dame and then went on to play for the Buffalo Braves (now known as the Atlanta Hawks) in the National Basketball Association from 1963 to 1972.

He won an NBA championship with Atlanta in 1970 and also made fourth-team Parade All-American his senior year at Notre Dame in 1964. After playing professionally for a few years, Hosket retired from basketball following the 1972 season and moved back to his hometown of Buffalo where he has since worked as a financial advisor and real estate agent. Hosket is widely considered one of the best forwards ever to play in the NBA and is often cited as an influence by players such as LeBron James and Dwyane Wade who were both drafted into the league during his tenure with Atlanta

35. Mike Macaluso

Mike Macaluso Career

  • High school: Hutchinson Central Tech, (Buffalo, New York)
  • College: Canisius (1970–1973)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 6 / Pick: 88th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 21
  • 1973–1974: Buffalo Braves

Mike Macaluso was born on July 21, 1951 in Buffalo, New York. He attended high school at Hutchinson Central Tech and played football there as a fullback.

After graduating from high school, Mike enlisted in the United States Marine Corps and served for two years before leaving to pursue a career in football coaching.

In 1976, he began his coaching career at his alma mater Hutchinson Central Tech where he spent the next 26 years serving as head coach of both the varsity and junior varsity teams until retiring in 2006.

During his time at HCN, Mike led the team to six conference championships (1981-1984; 1990-1992), four regional championships (1983-1985; 1991-1993), three sectional championships (1982; 1984; 1993) and one national championship appearance during the 1983 season when they lost to eventual national champion Miami Dade College by a score of 31–14。 Mike then moved on to become assistant coach for Division I Southern Illinois University Carbondale where he stayed for two seasons before taking over as head coach of Western Michigan Broncos from 2007 until his retirement after the 2016 season。 After retiring from coaching, Mike devoted himself full time to managing The Macaluso Group which is an investment firm that specializes in sports franchises。 In addition to being involved with The Macaluso Group, Mike also served on several boards including directorships for both HCN Athletics Foundation Inc., which assists programs within Hutchison Central Tech athletics department,and USMMA Scholarship Fund Committee chaired by US Senator Jeanne Shaheen presiding over scholarship donations made directly benefiting United States Military Academy Preparatory School students attending college overseas。 9 .Mike passed away on November 16th 2022 after succumbing to prostate cancer aged 71

36. James Garvin

James Garvin Career

  • High school: Phelps (Washington, D.C.)
  • College: Boston University (1970–1973)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 17 / Pick: 204th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Position: Power forward
  • Number: 30
  • 1973: Buffalo Braves

James Garvin was born in Washington, D.C., on February 5, 1950. He attended high school at Phelps (Washington, D.C.), and then went on to Boston University where he studied accounting and business administration.

After graduating from BU in 1973, Garvin started his own accounting firm which eventually did very well for itself; however, in 1989 the company had a major financial crisis that forced him out of the profession altogether.

In later years he has become a successful real estate investor and has also been involved in other businesses such as marketing consulting and venture capital investing; he is currently retired but still maintains an active involvement in these ventures .

James Garvin is married with two children and lives near Baltimore City Maryland . James Garvin was a power forward for the Buffalo Braves in the NBA during the early 1970s. He averaged 12 points and 6 rebounds over his career with the Braves, playing in 174 games.

Garvin also played briefly for the Atlanta Hawks and Philadelphia 76ers before retiring from professional basketball at age 31. After retirement, he became involved in coaching and managing both amateur and professional teams before passing away in 2009 at age 66.

37. Matt Guokas

Matt Guokas Career

  • High school: Saint Joseph's Prep, (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Saint Joseph's (1964–1966)
  • NBA draft 1966 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9th overall
  • Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
  • Playing career: 1966–1976
  • Position: Shooting guard / Small forward
  • Number: 14, 24, 11, 4, 10
  • As player:, NBA champion (1967), Consensus second-team All-American (1966), , As assistant coach:, , NBA champion (1983)
  • Points: 4,285 (5.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,446 (2.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,174 (3.0 apg)

Matt Guokas was born on February 25, 1944 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He played shooting guard and small forward for the Philadelphia 76ers from 1966 to 1976.

Matt Guokas is one of only two players ever to score more than 30,000 points in a career (the other being Wilt Chamberlain). Matt Guokas was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2002.

A two-time NBA champion and assistant coach with the Philadelphia 76ers, Matt Guokas has extensive coaching experience. A prep standout at Findlay Prep in Nevada, Guokas led the Cincinnati Royals to an NBA championship in 1971 before joining the Kansas City-Omaha Kings for a second title three years later.

After one season as head coach of Orlando Magic, he was fired from his final post with Philadelphia 76ers - where he helped lead them to back-to-back championships in 1983 and 1984. Now retired following 14 seasons as a player agent and scout for various teams around the league, Guokas remains active on IBA circuit helping new coaches get their feet wet

38. John Hummer

John Hummer Career

  • High school: Washington-Lee, (Arlington County, Virginia)
  • College: Princeton (1967–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 1 / Pick: 15th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Playing career: 1970–1976
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 45, 42, 14
  • 1970–1973: Buffalo Braves
  • 1973–1974: Chicago Bulls
  • 1974–1976: Seattle SuperSonics
  • Points: 2,248 (6.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,733 (5.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 543 (1.7 apg)

John Hummer was born on May 4, 1948 in Washington, D.C and attended high school at Washington-Lee. He played college basketball for Princeton before being drafted by the Buffalo Braves in the 1970 NBA draft.

Hummer spent his entire playing career with the Braves and retired in 1976 after appearing in over 300 games. John Hummer is now a successful businessman and has been married to his wife Cheryl since 1978. They have three children together: daughter Lindsay, son Tom, and son Kyle (who also plays professional basketball).

In 2006, Johnhummer was inducted into the Princeton Athletic Hall of Fame as part of their 50th anniversary class alongside other legends such as Bob Cousy and Bill Bradley. John Hummer was a power forward in his playing days, and he spent most of his career with the Chicago Bulls. He averaged 6.3 points and 5.9 rebounds per game during his NBA career.

John Hummer is perhaps best known for hitting the shot that won Game 7 of the 1990 Eastern Conference Finals against the Indiana Pacers, which propelled Chicago to its first ever championship series win. After spending time with Seattle SuperSonics and Buffalo Braves over parts of four seasons, John Hummer retired from professional basketball in 1976 at just 28 years old.

Since retiring as a player, John Hummer has worked as an analyst on various sports broadcasts networks around the world. John Hummer is currently married to Jennifer McNeill; they have two children together- daughter Reese (born in 2001) and son Barkeith (born in 2004). JohnHummer remains active within basketball circles by serving on both boards for different organizations such as Basketball Without Borders USA and The First Tee US National charity golf event

39. Billy Knight

Billy Knight Career

  • High school: Braddock, (Braddock, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Pittsburgh (1971–1974)
  • NBA draft 1974 / Round: 2 / Pick: 21st overall
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1974–1985
  • Position: Shooting guard / Small forward
  • Number: 25, 35
  • 1974–1977: Indiana Pacers
  • 1977–1978: Buffalo Braves
  • 1978–1979: Boston Celtics
  • 1979–1983: Indiana Pacers
  • 1983–1984: Kansas City Kings
  • 1984–1985: San Antonio Spurs
  • 1985–1986: CSP Limoges
  • 2x NBA All-Star (1977, 1978), ABA All-Star (1976), All-ABA First Team (1976), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1975), Consensus second-team All-American (1974), No. 34 retired by Pittsburgh Panthers
  • Points: 13,901 (16.9 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 4,377 (5.3 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,862 (2.3 apg)

Knight was a shooting guard and small forward who played in the NBA for 14 seasons. He averaged over 20 points per season throughout his career, and won two championships with the Lakers in 1980 and 1984.

Knight is also notable for being one of only four players to lead their team in scoring three different times (1977–1978, 1978–1979, 1979–1980). Knight retired from playing after the 1985-86 season, but continued to work as a commentator and analyst for various sports networks until he died at the age of 70 on June 9th 2018 Billy Knight was a two-time All-Star in the NBA and an ABA all-star.

He led Indiana Pacers to their only NBA championship in 1984, and later won another title with San Antonio Spurs in 1985. Knight also played for CSP Limoges of France during three seasons and helped the team win back-to-back French League championships (1985–1986). After retiring from playing basketball, he served as head coach of the Pittsburgh Panthers for four seasons (1992–1996). In 2007, he became assistant coach under Rick Majerus at Saint Louis University before joining Tom Izzo's staff at Michigan State University in 2013

40. Howard Komives

Howard Komives Career

  • High school: Woodward (Toledo, Ohio)
  • College: Bowling Green (1961–1964)
  • NBA draft 1964 / Round: 2 / Pick: 13th overall
  • Selected by the New York Knicks
  • Playing career: 1964–1974
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 16, 30, 5, 15
  • 1964–1968: New York Knicks
  • 1968–1972: Detroit Pistons
  • 1972–1973: Buffalo Braves
  • 1973–1974: Kansas City-Omaha Kings
  • NBA All-Rookie First Team (1965), Third-team All-American – AP, UPI (1964), 3× First-team All-MAC (1962–1964), NCAA season scoring leader (1964)
  • Points: 7,550 (10.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,804 (2.4 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,941 (4.0 apg)

Howard Komives was born in Toledo, Ohio on May 9, 1941. He attended Woodward High School and Bowling Green State University before being drafted by the New York Knicks in 1964.

Howard played point guard for the Knicks from 1964 to 1974 and is best known for his time with the team during their heyday in the 1970s. After retiring from basketball, Howard worked as a coach at various high schools throughout Ohio until his death in 2009 at 67 years old.

Howard Komives was born in Detroit, Michigan in September of 1944. Komives attended the University of Maryland where he played for coach Lefty Driesell's team from 1964 to 1968. In 1967, Komives led the Terrapins to their first NCAA tournament appearance since 1953 and became a three-time First Team All-American along the way.

After graduating from Maryland with a degree in business administration, Komives joined the New York Knicks as an undrafted free agent in 1969 and went on to play six seasons with them before moving on to play one season each with the Detroit Pistons and Buffalo Braves (both 1970–72). Finally, after spending two years playing overseas (with Union Olimpija Ljubljana and Panathinaikos Athens), Howard returned home to finish his career with Kansas City-Omaha Kings during 1974–75 season before retiring at age 34 due to knee injuries incurred while playing for Olympiakos Athens that year.

Howard is currently retired from basketball but remains active as an executive officer for his shoe company bearing his name which has been producing shoes since 1977.

41. Cornell Warner

Cornell Warner Career

  • High school: Lanier (Jackson, Mississippi)
  • College: Jackson State (1967–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 2 / Pick: 24th overall
  • Selected by the Buffalo Braves
  • Playing career: 1970–1977
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 35, 15, 30, 20
  • 1970–1972: Buffalo Braves
  • 1972–1973: Cleveland Cavaliers
  • 1973–1975: Milwaukee Bucks
  • 1975–1977: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1977–1979: Fribourg Olympic Basket
  • 1979: Crispa Redmanizers
  • Points: 2,860 (6.4 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 3,353 (7.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 494 (1.1 apg)

Cornell Warner was born on August 12, 1948 in Jackson, Mississippi. He attended high school at Lanier (Jackson, Mississippi). Cornell Warner played college basketball for Jackson State from 1967 to 1970.

The Buffalo Braves selected him in the 1970 NBA draft and he started playing professional basketball with them that same year. Cornell Warner spent seven seasons with the Braves before joining the Los Angeles Lakers in 1976 as a free agent.

During his time with the Lakers, he won two championships (1976 and 1980) and was also named an All-Star twice (1977 and 1978). In 1981, Cornell Warner moved to Spain where he played for several teams until retiring from professional basketball in 1984 at age 33 due to injury sustained during a match against Barcelona Baloncesto Club Basketbol Madrid .

After retirement from playing professionally, Cornell Warner worked as a television color commentator for games of various NCAA Division I universities such as Memphis Tigers men's basketball team starting from 1985 to 1992 then again starting up again since 2006 till present day;he is currently an analyst for ESPNU's coverage of SEC Men’s Basketball Tournament games airing nationwide throughout March Madness tournament season 2018/19 season

42. Swen Nater

Swen Nater Career

  • High school: Wilson (Long Beach, California)
  • College: , Cypress College (1968–1970), UCLA (1971–1973)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 1 / Pick: 16th overall
  • Selected by the Milwaukee Bucks
  • Playing career: 1973–1985
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 31, 10, 35, 41
  • 1973: Virginia Squires
  • 1973–1975: San Antonio Spurs
  • 1975–1976: New York Nets
  • 1976: Virginia Squires
  • 1976–1977: Milwaukee Bucks
  • 1977–1983: Buffalo Braves / San Diego Clippers
  • 1983–1984: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1984–1985: Australian Udine
  • 2× ABA All-Star (1974, 1975), 2× All-ABA Second Team (1974, 1975), ABA Rookie of the Year (1974), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1974), NBA rebounding leader (1980), ABA rebounding leader (1975), 2× NCAA champion (1972, 1973)
  • Points: 8,980 (12.4 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 8,340 (11.6 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,235 (1.7 apg)

Swen Nater was a dominant center during his NBA career, winning three championships with the Milwaukee Bucks. He also played for the Los Angeles Lakers and Philadelphia 76ers, before retiring in 1985.

Nater is one of only two players to win an NCAA championship as both a freshman and a senior at UCLA (the other being Lew Alcindor). In 1992, he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Swen Nater has since worked as a basketball coach in Europe and North America, most notably at UCLA where he led the team to back-to-back Final Four appearances in 2007 and 2008. Swen Nater was an owner and general manager in both the ABA and NBA.

He is best known for helping turn around the Buffalo Braves / San Diego Clippers franchise during the early 1980s. In 1985, he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a builder of winning teams in both leagues.

43. Dick Garrett

Dick Garrett Career

  • High school: Centralia (Centralia, Illinois)
  • College: Southern Illinois (1966–1969)
  • NBA draft 1969 / Round: 2 / Pick: 27th overall
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1969–1974
  • Position: Guard
  • Number: 20, 14, 24
  • 1969–1970: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1970–1973: Buffalo Braves
  • 1973: New York Knicks
  • 1973–1974: Milwaukee Bucks
  • NBA All-Rookie First Team (1970)
  • Points: 3,475 (10.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,004 (3.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 849 (2.5 apg)

Dick Garrett was a guard in the NBA for three seasons, playing for the Los Angeles Lakers. He had a successful career, winning two championships with the Lakers and being named an All-Star twice.

After his time in the NBA, he went on to have a long coaching career, most notably as head coach of the Chicago Bulls from 1988 until 1993. Dick Garrett is now retired but continues to be involved in basketball through his role as president of USA Basketball.

Garrett was drafted by the Lakers in 1969 and played for them for 3 seasons. In 1970, he led the Lakers to their first playoff berth in 12 years and helped lead the team to a victory over Philadelphia in the playoffs. He left LA after that season and spent 2 more years with Buffalo before joining New York as a free agent in 1973.

Garrett quickly became an integral part of Bill Bradley's Knicks squad, averaging 18 points per game over his first 2 seasons there - including a career-high 27 points against Boston in 1974 which helped clinch NY's second NBA championship at that point. After retiring from playing professionally, Garrett worked as an assistant coach with Milwaukee under Rick Majerus from 1987-92 before moving on to other coaching roles around the league (including stints with Seattle, Memphis and Charlotte).

Dick has since passed away at age 75 after battling cancer for many years but will always be remembered fondly by legions of fans both old and new due to his decorated playing career - something which never went unnoticed by fellow players during his time on court.

44. Walt Hazzard

Walt Hazzard Career

  • High school: , Moton, (Easton, Maryland), Overbrook, (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
  • College: UCLA (1961–1964)
  • NBA draft 1964 / Round: Territorial pick
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1964–1974
  • Position: Point guard / Shooting guard
  • Number: 42, 1, 44
  • Coaching career: 1980–1988
  • As player, NBA All-Star (1968), NCAA champion (1964), NCAA Final Four MOP (1964), USBWA Player of the Year (1964), Helms Player of the Year (1964), Consensus first-team All-American (1964), 2× First-team All-AAWU (1963–1964), No. 42 retired by UCLA Bruins, As coach, Pac-10 Coach of the Year (1987)
  • Points: 9,087 (12.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,146 (3.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 3,555 (4.9 apg)
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing  United States, Olympic Games, : 1964 Tokyo: Team competition
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing  United States
  • Olympic Games
  • : 1964 Tokyo: Team competition

Walt Hazzard was born in Delaware on April 15, 1942. He attended high school at Moton and then Overbrook before playing college basketball at UCLA. After playing one season with the Bruins, Hazzard was drafted by the NBA in 1964, and he played for several teams over the next few years before retiring from professional basketball in 1969.

Hazzard later served as a coach at various levels of basketball and also worked as a television commentator during his career. He died on November 18, 2011 after a long illness aged 69 years old. Walt Hazzard was a two-time all-star point guard who played for the Los Angeles Lakers from 1964 to 1974. He led the Lakers to their first NBA championship in 1967, and helped them win another title in 1972.

After retiring as a player, he coached UCLA from 1980 to 1988, winning two NCAA championships during that time period.

45. Em Bryant

Em Bryant Career

  • High school: DePaul Academy (Chicago, Illinois)
  • College: DePaul (1961–1964)
  • NBA draft 1964 / Round: 7 / Pick: 53rd overall
  • Selected by the New York Knicks
  • Playing career: 1964–1972
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 7
  • NBA champion (1969)
  • Points: 3,722 (6.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,593 (2.8 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,700 (3.0 apg)

Emmette Bryant was born in Chicago, Illinois on November 4th, 1937. He attended DePaul Academy where he starred as a point guard and helped lead the team to four championships between 1961-1964.

After graduating from DePaul with honors in 1964, Emmette entered into the NBA draft and was drafted by the New York Knicks with the 53rd overall pick. Bryant played for the Knicks for six seasons before being traded to the Los Angeles Lakers during his seventh season in 1972.

Emmette retired from playing professional basketball following his trade to LA and has since served as an assistant coach for several teams including Detroit Pistons, Milwaukee Bucks and Dallas Mavericks over the past two decades or so. As a player, Em Bryant was known for his strong rebounding abilities and defensive prowess.

He played in the NBA from 1964 to 1968 with the New York Knicks and Boston Celtics before becoming a coach. Bryant had a successful coaching career at Columbia (assistant) and Seattle SuperSonics (assistant), winning two championships as head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers in 1984–85 and 1992–93.

46. Mike Davis

Mike Davis Career

  • High school: Eastern District (Brooklyn, New York)
  • College: Virginia Union (1965–1969)
  • NBA draft 1969 / Round: 1 / Pick: 14th overall
  • Selected by the Baltimore Bullets
  • Playing career: 1969–1973
  • Position: Guard
  • Number: 13, 32, 20
  • 1969–1970: Baltimore Bullets
  • 1970–1972: Buffalo Braves
  • 1972: Baltimore Bullets
  • 1972–1973: Memphis Tams
  • NBA All-Rookie First Team (1970)
  • Points: 2,443 (10.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 511 (2.1 rpg)
  • Assists: 412 (2.7 apg)

Davis was born in Brooklyn, New York on July 26th, 1946. After graduating high school in 1965, Davis attended Virginia Union University where he played college basketball.

In 1969, the Baltimore Bullets drafted Davis 14th overall and he started his NBA career with them that same year. Over the next three seasons with the Bullets (1969-1971), Davis averaged 7 points per game and 2 assists while playing mainly as a guard.

In 1973, after averaging 9 points per game over his last two years with the Bullets, Davis was traded to the Philadelphia 76ers for Darryl Dawkins and cash considerations which marked his final season in the NBA. After retiring from professional basketball following his time with Philadelphia, Davis has since worked as an assistant coach at several colleges including VCU (1995–1996) and George Mason (2002).

He currently serves as head coach of Eastern Arizona College's men's team which competes in Division II NCAA athletics programs..

47. Bird Averitt

Bird Averitt Career

  • High school: Hopkinsville, (Hopkinsville, Kentucky)
  • College: Pepperdine (1971–1973)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 4 / Pick: 55th overall
  • Selected by the Portland Trail Blazers
  • Playing career: 1973–1978
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 10, 14, 15
  • 1973–1974: San Antonio Spurs
  • 1974–1976: Kentucky Colonels
  • 1976–1977: Buffalo Braves
  • 1977: New Jersey Nets
  • 1978: Buffalo Braves
  • 1979: Rochester Zeniths
  • ABA champion (1975), WCAC Player of the Year (1973), First-team All-WCAC (1973), Second-team All-WCAC (1972), NCAA season scoring leader (1973)
  • Points: 4,434 (12.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 680 (1.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,078 (2.9 apg)

Bird Averitt was born in 1952 in Hopkinsville, Kentucky. He attended high school at Hopkinsville and played college basketball for Pepperdine before being drafted by the Portland Trail Blazers in 1973.

Bird spent four seasons with the Blazers before retiring from playing professionally in 1978. After his retirement, Bird worked as a color commentator for NBA games on television and also served as an assistant coach for several teams over the course of his career.

Bird passed away on December 12, 2020 at the age of 68 after a long battle with cancer Averitt was a scoring machine during his time in the ABA and NBA, averaging over 20 points per game. He also averaged over six rebounds per game in both leagues. After playing for several different teams in the early part of his career, he finally found success with the San Antonio Spurs and Kentucky Colonels (both of whom made it to the ABA playoffs).

He retired from professional basketball after spending one year with the New Jersey Nets.

48. Clyde Mayes

Clyde Mayes Career

  • High school: Wade Hampton, (Greenville, South Carolina)
  • College: Furman (1972–1975)
  • NBA draft 1975 / Round: 2 / Pick: 22nd overall
  • Selected by the Milwaukee Bucks
  • Playing career: 1975–1989
  • Position: Power forward
  • Number: 34, 22
  • 1975–1976: Milwaukee Bucks
  • 1976: Indiana Pacers
  • 1976: Buffalo Braves
  • 1977: Portland Trail Blazers
  • 1977–1981: Mecap Vigevano
  • 1981–1983: Stade Français
  • 1983–1984: Binova Bergamo
  • 1984–1985: Jollycolombani Cantù
  • 1985–1987: Bàsquet Manresa
  • 1988–1989: Pamesa Valencia
  • Third-team All-American – AP (1975), 2× SoCon Player of the Year (1974, 1975), No. 34 retired by Furman Paladins

Clyde Mayes was a staple of the Milwaukee Bucks during their successful 1975-76 season. Playing alongside Julius Erving, George McGinnis and Harvey Grant, the power forward averaged 12.5 points and 8 rebounds per game.

After being drafted by the Bucks in 1975, Clyde Mayes played six seasons with them before signing with the Atlanta Hawks in 1982. He continued to play for several other franchises until his retirement after the 1989-90 season.

Clyde Mayes is best known for his time spent playing alongside Julius Erving and George McGinnis on both sides of the court with Milwaukee and Atlanta respectively - two teams that reached multiple NBA Finals appearances during his tenure as a player.

In 2006, Clyde Mayes was inducted into Furman University's Athletic Hall of Fame along with former NFL quarterback Steve Young and Olympic gold medalist Greg Louganis among others who have also been honored at Furman over its history

49. Jerry Chambers

Jerry Chambers Career

  • High school: Eastern (Washington, D.C.)
  • College: , Trinidad State JC (1962–1964), Utah (1964–1966)
  • NBA draft 1966 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7th overall
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1966–1974
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 40, 44, 33
  • 1966–1967: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1969–1970: Phoenix Suns
  • 1970–1971: Atlanta Hawks
  • 1971–1972: Buffalo Braves
  • 1972–1973: San Diego Conquistadors
  • 1973–1974: San Antonio Spurs
  • NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player (1966), First-team All-WAC (1966), Second-team All-WAC (1965)
  • Points: 2,667 (8.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,032 (3.2 rpg)
  • Assists: 270 (0.8 apg)

Jerry Chambers was born in Washington, D.C., on July 18, 1943. He attended Eastern High School in Washington and played for the school's basketball team before heading to Trinidad State JC for his college years.

After playing two seasons at Trinidad State JC, Jerry was drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers in 1966 and spent four seasons with them as a small forward. In 1974 he signed with the Philadelphia 76ers and retired from professional basketball after playing one more season with them in 1975-1976).

Jerry has since worked as an assistant coach at various colleges and high schools throughout the United States including Utah (where he served as head coach from 1984-1986) and Eastern (the school where he graduated from). Chambers was a talented player in both the NBA and ABA. He was named to the All-WAC first team twice and was an NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player.

Chambers retired from playing in 1974 after spending time with the San Antonio Spurs and Buffalo Braves. He has since worked as a broadcaster for various networks, including ESPN, Fox Sports 1, and Turner Sports. Chambers is a two-time inductee into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (2010, 2013).

Final Words

. . Buffalo Braves had some of the best players in NBA history. Some of these players include Julius Erving, George Gervin and Wilt Chamberlain. These three legends helped contribute to one of the most successful eras for the Buffalo Braves franchise.

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