Baltimore Orioles Best Players of All Time

The Baltimore Orioles are one of the most storied franchises in Major League Baseball. Founded in 1901 as the Milwaukee Brewers, they moved to St. Louis and became known as the Browns before finally settling down in Charm City nearly a century ago. Today, they’re part of MLB’s American League East division and have won three World Series titles since 1966. With stars like Cal Ripken Jr., Eddie Murray, and Brooks Robinson having suited up for them over time, their history is full of iconic moments that will never be forgotten by fans all over baseball-loving America.

1. Brooks Robinson

Third baseman

Brooks Robinson Career

  • 18× All-Star (1960–1974), 2× World Series champion (1966, 1970), AL MVP (1964), World Series MVP (1970), 16× Gold Glove Award (1960–1975), Roberto Clemente Award (1972), AL RBI leader (1964), Baltimore Orioles No. 5 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Robinson was a three-time batting champion and an all-star for 17 seasons, accumulating 2,848 hits in the process. Robinson played his entire career with the Baltimore Orioles and is one of only five players to have 3,000 hits and 500 home runs.

He led the American League in strikeouts four times and finished fourth on several other occasions. After retiring as a player, Brooks Robinson served as a manager for two teams before returning to playing at age 50 in 1977 – he held the record for oldest player to play until it was broken by Jim Edmonds six years later.

A diabetic since 1978, Brooks Robinson announced his retirement from baseball following the 1997 season due to complications from diabetes mellitus Brooks Robinson was one of the greatest hitters in baseball history. He played 18 seasons with the Baltimore Orioles and won two World Series titles. 2. Brooks Robinson is a member of the Hall of Fame and has been awarded many awards, including 16 Gold Gloves, MVP and Roberto Clemente Award.

3. Brooks Robinson's legacy will live on through his induction into Major League Baseball's All-Century Team as well as his contributions to both the game and Hall of Fame inductions

2. Cal Ripken Jr.

Third baseman

Cal Ripken Jr. Career

  • 19× All-Star (1983–2001), World Series champion (1983), 2× AL MVP (1983, 1991), AL Rookie of the Year (1982), 2× Gold Glove Award (1991, 1992), 8× Silver Slugger Award (1983–1986, 1989, 1991, 1993, 1994), Roberto Clemente Award (1992), MLB record 2,632 consecutive games played, Baltimore Orioles No. 8 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, Major League Baseball All-Century Team

Cal Ripken Jr. is a Hall of Famer who played shortstop and third baseman for the Baltimore Orioles over 20 seasons. He was one of baseball's most consistent players, never finishing lower than 4th in MVP voting or leading his league in strikeouts once.

His 3184 hits are fifth all-time and his 430 home runs rank 7th on the list. Ripken also had 1,695 RBIs which makes him one of just nine players with 2,000+ career RBIs and 100 HRs (he hit #3). He holds many records including consecutive games played (2,632), chances faced (12,721), at bats (5463) and singles (1,876).

Ripken has been voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame twice—in 1995 as a Third Baseman and again in 2013 as a shortstop/third baseman despite concerns about steroid use during his playing days that were not fully resolved until later in life by Biogenesis researchers he hired to investigate these claims specifically targeted at him.

Despite being sidelined by neck problems from 2001-2004 he still ranks 8th on MLB's all-time lists with 24 Gold Gloves awards as well as 5 Platinum Glove Awards given to the best fielding player at each position regardless of whether they lead their league in that category or not; this distinction is usually only given to catchers because they handle more difficult balls than any other infielder & outfielders combined.

At 62 years old Ripken retired after playing his final game against the New York Yankees - becoming just the 6th player ever to play 3000+ innings & 500+ games while averaging over 200 hits per season (.276 BA / .431 HR avg.).

3. Eddie Murray

Eddie Murray Career

  • 8× All-Star (1978, 1981–1986, 1991), World Series champion (1983), AL Rookie of the Year (1977), 3× Gold Glove Award (1982–1984), 3× Silver Slugger Award (1983, 1984, 1990), AL home run leader (1981), AL RBI leader (1981), Baltimore Orioles No. 33 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Murray was a five-time All Star and three-time Gold Glover. He spent the majority of his career with the Baltimore Orioles, but also played for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Seattle Mariners.

Murray is best known for his power hitting, as he hit 3255 home runs in his career. Murray is one of only six players to have 400+ hits, 30+ home runs, 100+ RBIs and 50+ doubles in a season (he did it four times).

In 1997, Murray had an excellent year batting .287 with 53 home runs and 117 RBIs – finishing second in MVP voting behind Ken Griffey Jr.. A two-time World Series champion and eight-time All-Star, Murray was one of the most dominant hitters in baseball history.

He led the Orioles to their only championship in 1983 and also won three Silver Slugger Awards and a Gold Glove Award during his career. Known for his powerful bat and superb on-base skills, Murray ranks fifth all time in home runs with 592 long balls.

4. Mike Mussina

Pitcher

Mike Mussina Career

  • 5× All-Star (1992–1994, 1997, 1999), 7× Gold Glove Award (1996–1999, 2001, 2003, 2008), MLB wins leader (1995), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Mike Mussina was a dominant pitcher in his day, and he won 270 games over the course of his career. He made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 1991, and stayed there for six seasons before moving on to the Yankees.

While with New York, he helped lead them to three World Series titles (1996-1998) as well as four American League pennants (1995-1997, 1999). In 2008, after playing just one season for the Washington Nationals, Mike retired at age 39 due to an injury sustained during spring training.

Since retiring from baseball, Mike has focused on broadcasting and coaching; he currently works as a color commentator for MASN televison broadcasts of the Baltimore Orioles games. Mussina was a three-time All Star and won seven Gold Glove Awards, making him one of the most decorated pitchers in Orioles history.

Mussina led the majors in wins twice (1995 and 2001) and finished third once (1996). He also holds records for most strikeouts in a season with 2,813 (1999), as well as consecutive complete games without an ERA over 5 innings pitched streak of 7 starts (2002–2004). After spending 13 seasons with Baltimore, Mussina signed with the Yankees in 2008 where he spent six more seasons before retiring at age 41.

5. Jim Palmer

Pitcher

Jim Palmer Career

  • 6× All-Star (1970–1972, 1975, 1977, 1978), 3× World Series champion (1966, 1970, 1983), 3× AL Cy Young Award (1973, 1975, 1976), 4× Gold Glove Award (1976–1979), 3× AL wins leader (1975–1977), 2× AL ERA leader (1973, 1975), Pitched no-hitter on August 13, 1969, Baltimore Orioles No. 22 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Jim Palmer was one of the most dominant pitchers in MLB history. He won 268 games and lost 152, posting an ERA of 2.86 and striking out 2,212 batters in his career.

In 1973 he became the first pitcher to win 30 or more games in consecutive seasons since Cy Young did it from 1901-03. After playing for Baltimore Orioles from 1965-1984, Palmer signed with the California Angels where he finished his career with a record of 203–158 and 3 playoff appearances (winning 1 game).

Jim Palmer is currently a broadcaster for MASN Sports Network where he contributes as an analyst on Orioles baseball broadcasts throughout the season. Jim Palmer was one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history and is often considered to be one of the best ever. He won three World Series titles with Baltimore, and also received several awards and accolades during his career.

Palmer was known for his pinpoint accuracy, overpowering performances on occasion, as well as his durability – he never missed a start throughout an 18-year major league career. Although he retired in 1984 at the relatively young age of 41, Palmer remains highly respected by many fans and experts alike due to his legendary status within the sport.

6. Boog Powell

Infielder

Boog Powell Career

  • 4× All-Star (1968–1971), 2× World Series champion (1966, 1970), AL MVP (1970), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Boog Powell was a consistent hitter and fielder for over 20 years in the MLB. He played for five different teams, but is most remembered for his time with the Baltimore Orioles.

His best season came in 1972 when he hit .309/.387/.505 with 29 home runs and 114 RBIs. Although he had some great seasons, Boog Powell's career was cut short by a series of injuries that forced him to retire at the age of 36.

After retiring from baseball, Boog Powell worked as a broadcaster for both TV and radio stations until his retirement in 2006. Boog Powell was a versatile player who could hit for average and power. He won two World Series titles with the Baltimore Orioles, in 1966 and 1970.

Boog Powell played his entire career with the Cleveland Indians, from 1975 to 1976 and 1977 to 1978. After retiring as a player, Boog Powell served as hitting coach for the Dodgers from 1979 to 1987. In 1993, he became manager of the Kansas City Royals but was fired after just one season in that position.

Boog Powell passed away on October 16th, 2012 at age 80 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease

7. Frank Robinson

Outfielder

Frank Robinson Career

  • 14× All-Star (1956, 1957, 1959, 1959², 1961, 1961², 1962², 1965–1967, 1969–1971, 1974), 2× World Series champion (1966, 1970), NL MVP (1961), AL MVP (1966), World Series MVP (1966), Triple Crown (1966), NL Rookie of the Year (1956), Gold Glove Award (1958), AL Manager of the Year (1989), Cincinnati Reds No. 20 retired, Baltimore Orioles No. 20 retired, Cleveland Guardians No. 20 retired, Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, Cleveland Guardians Hall of Fame, Washington Nationals Ring of Honor

Robinson was one of the most successful and popular players in MLB history. He played for 17 seasons, winning three MVP Awards and a Gold Glove Award. Robinson is best known for his exploits as an outfielder with the Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Indians, but he also managed several teams during his career.

Robinson died on February 7th 2019 at the age of 83 after a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease. Robinson was one of the most successful and iconic players in baseball history. He played for 17 seasons, accumulating 586 home runs and 1,812 RBIs along the way. In 1956, Robinson became just the sixth player in MLB history to hit 40 home runs in a season.

As a manager, he led Cleveland Indians to their first championship in 74 years when they defeated Boston Red Sox in 1976 World Series. After retiring as a player, Robinson served as bench coach for Baltimore Orioles (1988-1991) before becoming manager of Montreal Expos until his firing after only two seasons at the helm due to poor performance on field

8. Bobby Grich

Bobby Grich Career

  • 6× All-Star (1972, 1974, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1982), 4× Gold Glove Award (1973–1976), Silver Slugger Award (1981), AL home run leader (1981), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, Angels Hall of Fame

Grich was a second baseman for the Baltimore Orioles from 1970-1986. He made his MLB debut in 1970 and played until 1986. Grich collected 2,234 hits in his career and had a batting average of .264.

In 1978, he won the American League Gold Glove Award at second base. Grich is currently an analyst for ESPN's Baseball Tonight show where he gives insights on current players and teams in the MLB. He was a five-time all-star and led the Orioles in home runs in 1981.

He played for both the Baltimore Orioles (1970–1976) and California Angels (1977–1986). He won several awards, including an AL home run leader award, a Silver Slugger Award, and a Hall of Fame induction from both teams. Bobby Grich was one of the most successful hitters of his era, leaving an impressive legacy behind him.

9. Adam Jones

Center fielder

Adam Jones Career

  • 5× All-Star (2009, 2012–2015), 4× Gold Glove Award (2009, 2012–2014), Silver Slugger Award (2013)

Jones is a veteran outfielder with over two 300-hit seasons under his belt. He was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the second round of the 2006 MLB draft, and made his big league debut that year.

Jones has spent most of his career with the Mariners, but signed with the Arizona Diamondbacks prior to the 2019 season. Jones is known for being an aggressive hitter who can hit for power as well as average.

In addition to hitting home runs, he also has a strong throwing arm which helps him defensively at both middle and right field positions Adam Jones is a five-time All-Star and four-time Gold Glove Award winner.

Adam Jones has hit over .300 in nine of his 14 seasons in the MLB, including a career high batting average of .297 in 2016. Injuries have slowed down Jones somewhat since his prime years, limiting him to 66 RBIs this season despite playing in all but one game for Baltimore Orioles.

The switch hitter is also known for being an elite defender at both first base and left field making him a valuable asset to any team he plays for on the diamond.

10. Nick Markakis

Outfielder

Nick Markakis Career

  • Batting average: .288
  • Hits: 2,388
  • Home runs: 189
  • Runs batted in: 1,046
  • All-Star (2018), 3× Gold Glove Award (2011, 2014, 2018), Silver Slugger Award (2018)

Nick Markakis is a right fielder who has played in the MLB for 10 seasons. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the first round of the 2002 amateur draft and made his debut with them four years later.

In 2012, he signed with Atlanta as a free agent and helped them reach their first ever World Series that year. In 2020, Markakis announced his retirement from the MLB after ten successful seasons and three World Series appearances with Atlanta.

Nick Markakis is a well-known and respected member of the Baltimore Orioles organization. Nick has appeared in over 2,500 games during his career, accumulating over 18000 hits and 189 home runs. Nick was named to three All-Star teams and won two Gold Glove Awards as a second baseman for the Atlanta Braves in 2018.

11. Brian Roberts

Infielder

Brian Roberts Career

  • 2× All-Star (2005, 2007), AL stolen base leader (2007), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Roberts was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the first round of the 1997 MLB Draft. Roberts made his MLB debut with Baltimore on June 14, 2001. He played for them until 2008.

After leaving Baltimore, Roberts signed a 2-year contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers and played for them from 2009 to 2011 before returning to Baltimore in 2012. In 2013 and 2014, he played for the St Louis Cardinals but did not play in 2015 due to injury..

Brian returned to action with The Orioles in 2016 where he is currently playing as their second baseman In 2005, 2006 and 2007 he won three Gold Glove Awards at Second Base which is an award given annually to a player who displays exceptional fielding skills at that position; it is considered one of baseball's most prestigious honors .

Roberts batted .276 with 97 home runs and 542 RBI in his career with the Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees, and Philadelphia Phillies. Roberts was an All-Star twice and a stolen base leader for the Orioles. He hit over .300 three times in his career, including two seasons of batting over .350. After playing 10 seasons with the Oriole

12. Manny Machado

Third baseman

Manny Machado Career

  • 6× All-Star (2013, 2015, 2016, 2018, 2021, 2022), 2× All-MLB First Team (2020, 2022), 2× Gold Glove Award (2013, 2015), Platinum Glove Award (2013), Silver Slugger Award (2020), Fielding Bible Award (2013)

Manny Machado is a third baseman and shortstop who had an impressive MLB career. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 2012 and has since played for them, as well as the San Diego Padres.

Machado is known for his powerful hitting ability, which has resulted in him having one of the highest batting averages in MLB history. His achievements have led to him being named MVP twice (in 2016 and 2017) and earning numerous other awards throughout his career.

Machado will be 31 years old at the end of this season, so he may not have many more seasons left where he can compete at such a high level in baseball. However, with continued good performance it’s likely that we will see MannyMachado continue to be one of the best players in the game for some time to come.

Manny Machado is a three-time All Star and Gold Glove Award winner. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 2010 and has since played for them, as well as the Los Angeles Dodgers and San Diego Padres. Machado has an impressive record of 1,597 hits, 283 home runs and 853 RBIs in his career so far. On 27th October 2018 he was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers in exchange for five players including top prospect Zion Williamson Jr..

With LA he won his second consecutive MVP award after leading the league with 34 home runs while driving in 115 RBIs; completing a brilliant 3 year run with Baltimore from 2012-2014 before being traded away.

13. Brady Anderson

Brady Anderson Career

  • 3× All-Star (1992, 1996, 1997), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Brady Anderson was a highly productive left-handed hitter in the MLB for 13 seasons. He finished with a .285 batting average, 303 home runs and 1,032 RBIs.

Anderson made his debut with the Boston Red Sox in 1988 and helped lead them to their first World Series championship that year. The following season he hit 34 home runs and drove in 115 runs, earning him Rookie of the Year honors.

In 1992Anderson led all major league hitters with 37 home runs while also recording 121 RBIs and 107 walks. He joined an exclusive club by winning both MVP (American League) and ROY (National League) Awards that season. After spending three years playing for Cleveland, Anderson returned to Boston for two more seasons before retiring at the end of 2001 campaign having played his final game on May 20th against Texas Rangers at Fenway Park..

Brady's son Burt is currently pitching in Major League Baseball as well as being one of ESPN's top commentators

14. Melvin Mora

Melvin Mora Career

  • 2× All-Star (2003, 2005), Silver Slugger Award (2004), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Melvin Mora is a third baseman who played for the New York Mets from 1999-2011. In his MLB career, Melvin Mora hit .259 with 202 home runs and 898 RBIs.

He also threw out 43% of would-be base stealers (126 out of 266), which was good for 5th in MLB at the time he retired. After playing in 2011 with the Arizona Diamondbacks, Melvin Mora announced his retirement at age 36 due to several injuries sustained over the years including concussions and rotator cuff tears that were not previously disclosed by him or team doctors during examinations after being traded to Arizona from Baltimore in 2010.

Melvin Mora was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the 2nd round of the 2000 MLB Draft. He played for 4 different teams during his career: New York Mets (1999-2000), Baltimore Orioles (2000-2009), Colorado Rockies (2010) and Arizona Diamondbacks (2011). While with the Orioles, Melvin Mora won a Silver Slugger Award and made 2 All Star appearances. After playing for 3 more seasons with the Rockies, he retired at age 34 in 2011 due to an ankle injury sustained while playing winter ball in Venezuela.

15. Paul Blair

Paul Blair Career

  • 2× All-Star (1969, 1973), 4× World Series champion (1966, 1970, 1977, 1978), 8× Gold Glove Award (1967, 1969–1975), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Paul Blair was a center fielder who played in the Major Leagues for over 20 years. He hit well over .300 throughout his career, and had several successful seasons with the Orioles.

In 1980, he joined the Yankees as an aging player, but did not have much success there. He retired in 1984 after playing for the Houston Astros and Boston Red Sox. After retiring from baseball, Blair worked as a broadcaster for various teams until his death at 69 years old in 2013 Paul Blair was a standout player in both the minor and major leagues.

He batted over .300 in each of his first four seasons, and won two World Series with the Yankees. After playing for five teams in eight years, Blair retired at the age of 32 due to injury. After retiring from baseball, Blair worked as a sportscaster for ABC-TV until his death at 69 years old.

16. Mike Flanagan

Pitcher

Mike Flanagan Career

  • All-Star (1978), World Series champion (1983), AL Cy Young Award (1979), MLB wins leader (1979), Pitched a combined no-hitter on July 13, 1991, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Flanagan was a pitcher who played in the majors from 1975 to 1992. He had an impressive career, winning 178 games and earning 12 Gold Gloves. Flanagan's death at 59 is still being investigated as of this writing; however, it is believed that he died from natural causes.

Flanagan was known for his control and strong pitching skills, which helped him win many games over the course of his career. Flanagan was an all-star pitcher in his day and led the Orioles to a World Series championship in 1983. He also won several awards, including an AL Cy Young Award, during his career.

After retiring as a player, Flanagan went on to manage various teams before being inducted into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame in 2013.

17. Chris Davis

Third baseman

Chris Davis Career

  • All-Star (2013), Silver Slugger Award (2013), 2× MLB home run leader (2013, 2015), AL RBI leader (2013)

Chris Davis is a first baseman who has played in MLB for ten seasons. He was drafted by the Texas Rangers in 2008 and made his MLB debut that year. In 2017, he led the majors with 48 home runs and finished second in MVP voting behind Giancarlo Stanton.

In 2020, he signed with the Baltimore Orioles and hit .236/.324/.528 with 31 home runs over 132 games before being traded to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at the end of the season. Davis is a six-time All Star, three-time Silver Slugger Award winner, two-time Gold Glove Winner, and one time Home Run Derby Champion Davis had a very successful career with the Texas Rangers and Baltimore Orioles.

He was an All-Star in 2013 and 2015, won a Silver Slugger Award in 2013, and led the AL in RBIs both seasons. Davis also hit 295 home runs during his career which is second all-time to only Barry Bonds. Overall, he was a prolific hitter who helped lead his teams to success on the field.

18. Mike Cuellar

Pitcher

Mike Cuellar Career

  • 4× All-Star (1967, 1970, 1971, 1974), 2× World Series champion (1964, 1970), AL Cy Young Award (1969), MLB wins leader (1970), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Mike Cuellar was a pitcher in the MLB for over 20 years. He is best known for his time with the Cincinnati Reds, where he won 185 games and lost 130. However, Mike also had successful stints with the California Angels and Orlando Pirates, finishing his career with an overall record of 330 wins and 310 losses.

In addition to pitching, Mike also played first base and third base during his career. He retired from baseball after playing in 1977 with the Angels. After retiring from baseball, Mike Cuellar worked as a scout for several teams before passing away at age 72 in 2010 after a long battle with cancer Cuellar was a 4× All-Star and 2x World Series champion with the Baltimore Orioles.

Mike Cuellar is one of only seven players in MLB history to lead his league in wins twice. In 1970, Cuellar became the first pitcher in baseball history to win an MVP Award, Cy Young Award, and League Leader award all within the same season. After retiring from playing ball following the 1976 season, Cuellar served as bench coach for both Baltimore Orioles (1980–1982) and California Angels organizations (1983–1986).

On December 9th 1986 Mike Cuellar passed away at age 50 after suffering a heart attack while coaching winter ball in Puerto Rico

19. Miguel Tejada

Infielder

Miguel Tejada Career

  • 6× All-Star (2002, 2004–2006, 2008, 2009), AL MVP (2002), 2× Silver Slugger Award (2004, 2005), MLB RBI leader (2004)

Miguel Tejada was a shortstop for the Oakland Athletics from 1997-2013. He batted .285 with 2,407 hits and 307 home runs in his career. Miguel Tejada won three Gold Gloves (2002–2004) and one Silver Slugger Award (2006).

After retiring as a player, he served two stints as Baltimore Orioles' manager (2012-2014; 2016). On August 10th, 2013, Miguel Tejada announced his retirement after 14 seasons in the MLB playing for five different teams including Kansas City Royals where he finished his illustrious career.

Miguel Tejada was a three-time All-Star and two-time Silver Slugger Award winner with the Oakland Athletics. He played for six different teams in his 12 MLB seasons, but is most famous for his time with the Baltimore Orioles. After being traded to the Houston Astros midway through the 2009 season, Miguel Tejada led them to their first ever playoff appearance.

Injuries forced him to retire at age 36 after playing just one more game with San Diego Padres in 2013 season. Although he retired from baseball, Miguel Tejada remains an icon in Mexico and Latin America for his stellar play on the field and charitable work off of it

20. Matt Wieters

Catcher

Matt Wieters Career

  • 4× All-Star (2011, 2012, 2014, 2016), 2× Gold Glove Award (2011, 2012)

A right-handed catcher, Matt Wieters was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the second round of the 2007 MLB Draft. He made his major league debut with them on May 29, 2009.

After playing for Baltimore and the Washington Nationals over seven seasons, he was traded to the Miami Marlins on July 30, 2018 as part of a three team deal that also involved sending Ian Kinsler to Washington and Yandy Diaz to Miami.

In 953 career games played (including playoffs), Wieters has amassed 2,867 at bats and compiled 1,041 hits along with 54 home runs and 207 RBIs. He has thrown out 330 base runners during those contests while committing just 22 errors in total (.976 fielding percentage).

A two-time All-Star selection (2011 & 2013), he is also a member of both Orioles franchise records for most hit by pitch (26) and most caught stealing (19).

21. Adley Rutschman

Catcher

Adley Rutschman Career

  • Golden Spikes Award (2019), Dick Howser Award (2019)

Rutschman made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2019. He was originally drafted by the Chicago Cubs as a shortstop but ended up being moved to catcher after signing with them.

Rutschman has been praised for his defensive skills behind the plate, and has already accumulated over 100 minor league catches and 20 home runs in just three seasons of professional baseball.

The 24-year-old is currently playing for the Double A Bowie Baysox, where he's batting .270 with four home runs and 31 RBIs on the season so far. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the 1st round of the 2019 MLB Draft.

He is a left-handed batter and bats .254 with 13 home runs and 42 RBIs in 112 games played for the Orioles this season. Rutschman has been praised for his hitting ability, speed, and defense at second base, making him an important part of their team going forward.

22. J. J. Hardy

Infielder

J. J. Hardy Career

  • 2× All-Star (2007, 2013), 3× Gold Glove Award (2012–2014), Silver Slugger Award (2013), Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

J. J. Hardy is a switch hitter who has played shortstop for most of his career. He was drafted by the Brewers in 2005 and made his MLB debut with them that year.

He spent six seasons with Milwaukee before being traded to Baltimore in 2013. In 2017, he announced his retirement from baseball after 14 seasons in the big leagues.

Hardy has averaged 43 stolen bases per season throughout his career, which is sixth all-time among shortstops (minimum 400 attempts). In addition to being an excellent fielder, Hardy also has a strong batting average (.286) and on-base percentage (.363).

He won two Gold Gloves while playing for the Orioles and was named an All-Star twice (2011, 2012). Hardy finished as one of the top 10 players in Baltimore history according to both offensive and defensive metrics ESPN ranked him eighth overall on their list of 100 Greatest Orioles Players ever released earlier this year 9 ..

23. Mark Belanger

Mark Belanger Career

  • All-Star (1976), World Series champion (1970), 8× Gold Glove Award (1969, 1971, 1973–1978), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Mark Belanger was a very talented shortstop who had a lengthy career in the MLB. He started his career with the Baltimore Orioles and played for them until 1982.

After leaving the Orioles, he spent time with the Los Angeles Dodgers before retiring in 1982. During his playing days, Mark Belanger was known for being an excellent fielder and hitter.

He is remembered as one of the best shortstops to play in MLB history and will always be loved by fans because of it. Belanger was a six-time all-star and three-time World Series champion with the Baltimore Orioles.

He batted .228 over his career, but hit 20 home runs and 389 RBIs. Mark Belanger is one of only four players in baseball history to have at least 3,000 hits, 1,500 doubles and 500 homers. Between 1965 and 1981 he played for the Baltimore Orioles before joining the Los Angeles Dodgers for part of 1982 season.

24. Rafael Palmeiro

Rafael Palmeiro Career

  • 4× All-Star (1988, 1991, 1998, 1999), 3× Gold Glove Award (1997–1999), 2× Silver Slugger Award (1998, 1999)

Rafael Palmeiro played in the MLB for over 20 years and was a three-time All-Star. He is most famous for his home run record, which he set with the Baltimore Orioles in 2005.

Palmeiro also had a reputation as one of the best defensive first basemen of his era. After retiring from baseball, Rafael Palmeiro has started coaching and managing in Cuba's professional league.

Rafael Palmeiro was one of the most dominant hitters in baseball during the 1990s. He led the majors in home runs and batting average for three consecutive seasons and won multiple awards, including a Silver Slugger Award.

Palmeiro’s career ended prematurely due to injury but he remains one of the all-time great sluggers.

25. Dave McNally

Dave McNally Career

  • 3× All-Star (1969, 1970, 1972), 2× World Series champion (1966, 1970), AL wins leader (1970), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

McNally was a pitcher who played in the Majors for 16 seasons, most notably with the Baltimore Orioles. He had a career ERA of 3.93 and won 101 games. McNally also enjoyed some success as a relief pitcher, winning 104 games in that role over his career.

Dave McNally passed away on December 1st 2002 at the age of 60 after suffering from cancer for several years prior to his death. Dave McNally was a pitcher for both the Baltimore Orioles and Montreal Expos during his 19-year career. He was a three-time All Star and World Series champion with the Orioles, winning in 1966 and 1970.

McNally finished his career with an 184-119 record, 3.24 ERA, 1,512 strikeouts and 11 teams over his 19 seasons in baseball.

26. Jonathan Schoop

Infielder

Jonathan Schoop Career

  • All-Star (2017)

Jonathan Schoop is a talented second baseman who has played in the MLB for three seasons. In 2017, Schoop hit .255 with 1,066 hits and 174 home runs in 537 at bats.

He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 2013 and has since developed into one of the better players at his position. Jonathan Schoop is married to Arianne Boucher and they have two children - daughter Harper (born March 2018) and son Knox (born November 2019).

Jonathan Schoop's career is still young so he has plenty of time to improve on his stats and become an even more successful player in the MLB. Jonathan Schoop was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 2013 and has played for them ever since. Jonathan Schoop is a two-time All Star and won a World Baseball Classic with the Netherlands in 2011.

He's also been successful domestically, winning three Gold Gloves (2013-2015) and hitting over .300 each season from 2014 to 2017. His future with the Orioles is uncertain as they are scheduled to move to Milwaukee next season, but he could still play for them if they stay put or sign elsewhere afterwards. Jonathan Schoop will compete internationally for Holland at the upcoming Baseball World Cup this year

27. Al Bumbry

Al Bumbry Career

  • All-Star (1980), World Series champion (1983), AL Rookie of the Year (1973), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Al Bumbry was a talented center fielder who played in the majors for over 20 years. He had an impressive batting average and on-base percentage, as well as good speed.

Al Bumbry also threw right-handed, which helped him in his long career as a center fielder. After playing with several teams throughout his big league career, Al Bumbry retired in 1985 after playing for the San Diego Padres.

Today, Al Bumbry is still active and regularly attends baseball games to watch his former team, the Baltimore Orioles play. Al Bumbry was a left-handed hitter and third baseman who played for the Baltimore Orioles from 1972 to 1984.

Al Bumbry was one of the most successful hitters in Oriole history, hitting .281 with 54 home runs and 402 RBIs over that span. In 1983, he led the Orioles to their first World Series title since 1966, batting .500 (10-20) with two home runs and six RBIs in nine games.

After playing his final season with San Diego in 1985, Bumbry retired as an all-time great Oriole player. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1998 after being voted by fans as one of the top five players ever to wear an O's uniform. Al is currently a broadcaster for MASN Sports Network; he also has his own baseball academy located near Washington D C called "Al's Baseball Academy".

28. Zack Britton

Pitcher

Zack Britton Career

  • 2× All-Star (2015, 2016), AL Reliever of the Year (2016), AL saves leader (2016)

Zack Britton is a free agent pitcher who played for the Baltimore Orioles from 2011 to 2018. He has had some success in the MLB, with an ERA of 3.38 and 1,542 strikeouts over 936 innings pitched.

Britton was born on December 22nd, 1987 in Panorama City, California. He attended UCLA where he majored in business economics before being drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the 4th round of the 2009 amateur draft.

After joining the Orioles organization as a reliever out of college, Britton made his big league debut on April 3rd, 2011 against Toronto at Camden Yards and started two games later that season while starter Tommy Hunter was on bereavement leave following his wife's death.

In 2012 Zack emerged as one of Oriole's top starters posting a 14-12 record with a 2.08 ERA despite struggling down stretch (7 starts). His breakout year came in 2013 when he went 21-6 with a 2 .93 ERA and finished 5th in American League Cy Young voting behind winner Yu Darvish , David Price , Felix Hernandez , and Dallas Keuchel .

Injury struck again for Zack during 2014 when he tore his Achilles tendon late into Spring Training leading him to miss most of that season including all but 6 innings pitched after returning midseason.. The injury once again derailed what could have been another great year by Zachy as he finished 16-13 with an ERA under 3 which would've led AL...he did however win ALCS MVP honors against Kansas City Royals

29. Ken Singleton

Ken Singleton Career

  • 3× All-Star (1977, 1979, 1981), World Series champion (1983), Roberto Clemente Award (1982), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Ken Singleton played for the Mets, Orioles and Milwaukee Brewers in his 12-year career. He is most well known for his time with the Orioles, where he was a three-time All Star and led the team to their first postseason appearance in 1983.

After leaving baseball, Ken started a successful restaurant chain which still operates today. In 2012, Ken was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame as one of its inaugural members Ken Singleton was a three-time all-star and World Series champion with the Baltimore Orioles.

He started his MLB career with the Mets in 1970, before moving on to Montreal in 1972 and finally finishing his career with the Orioles in 1984. Singleton is perhaps best known for leading the AL in home runs twice (1976, 1980), as well as hits once (1974). Ken Singleton also holds several other records within baseball, such as most doubles (1,546) and triples (232).

After retiring from playing professionally, he served as a major league coach for five seasons between 1985 and 1990 with Baltimore, Philadelphia and Toronto respectively. In 2006, he was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame alongside former teammate Tom Underwood; both players were elected unanimously by members of Canada's National Baseball Congress Foundation.[1]

30. Rick Dempsey

Rick Dempsey Career

  • 2× World Series champion (1983, 1988), World Series MVP (1983), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Rick Dempsey was a catcher in the Major Leagues for over 20 years. He was known for his strong throwing arm and good batting average. He retired from baseball in 1992 after playing with the Baltimore Orioles.

Rick Dempsey is a three-time World Series champion and MVP. He played for the Minnesota Twins, New York Yankees, and Cleveland Indians in his career. His most successful years were with the Yankees where he won two championships and was an all-star eight times.

After retiring from baseball, Rick became a broadcaster for several teams including Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers, and Cleveland Indians before ending his broadcasting career in 2007 with Fox Sports Ohio He has also written books about his life as a professional baseball player

31. Davey Johnson

Davey Johnson Career

  • 4× All-Star (1968–1970, 1973), 3× World Series champion (1966, 1970, 1986), 3× Gold Glove Award (1969–1971), 2× Manager of the Year (1997, 2012), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame, New York Mets Hall of Fame

Johnson was born on January 30, 1943 in Orlando, Florida. He made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 1965 and spent 14 seasons with the team before joining the Chicago Cubs in 1978.

Johnson enjoyed a successful managerial career after leaving baseball and led the Washington Nationals to their first division title since 2005 in 2012. He announced his retirement from managing following that season but has remained involved with the team as a special advisor.

Johnson had a long and successful managerial career, managing the Mets for 14 seasons. Johnson was known for his ability to get the most out of his players, as evidenced by his 1,372 wins over 1,071 losses. He led the Orioles to two World Series championships in 1983 and 1990. Johnson also managed teams in Cincinnati and Baltimore before joining the Mets in 1984.

32. Chris Hoiles

Chris Hoiles Career

  • Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Chris Hoiles played baseball for Bowling Green before being drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 1989. He made his MLB debut with the Orioles that same year and went on to play thirteen seasons in the league, mostly as a catcher but also playing some first base and left field.

Chris Hoiles was one of only six players in major league history to have at least 3,000 hits and 500 home runs as a catcher; he accomplished both feats during his time with the Orioles. In 2001, Chris Hoiles became just the fourth player ever to hit 40 doubles, 20 triples, 10 homers and steal 50 bases in a season – an accomplishment he repeated two years later.

After retiring from baseball following 2002 season, Chris Hoiles served as hitting coach for the minor league Norfolk Tides until 2007 when he was named manager of their Triple-A affiliate Bowie Baysox team; he held that position until 2009 when he resigned due to personal reasons unrelated to Bowie's performance on the field (the team finished last overall in their division).

In 2010,ChrisHoiles joined ESPN Deportes where he covers Major League Baseball from a Spanish language perspective while continuing work as an analyst for Oriole games on MASN2+. Currently resides near Tampa Bay with his wife Annette who is originally from Puerto Rico

33. Milt Pappas

Milt Pappas Career

  • 3× All-Star (1962, 1962², 1965), Pitched a no-hitter on September 2, 1972, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Pappas pitched for the Chicago Cubs in 1973 and 1974. He was a valuable reliever with the Orioles during his early career, but he became more known as a starting pitcher later on.

Pappas had trouble staying healthy over the years and announced his retirement in 2005 after undergoing surgery to remove cancer from his colon. However, Pappas came back briefly in 2006 before retiring for good at the end of that season.

Aged 76 when he passed away, Milt Pappas will be remembered as one of baseball's most iconic pitchers of all time. An all-star pitcher in his day, Milt Pappas had a long and successful career with the Chicago Cubs. He pitched for the team from 1970 to 1973 and won 209 games while losing 164.

One of the most accomplished pitchers in MLB history, Pappas holds several records including having struck out 1,728 batters during his career - an impressive total that still stands today. A three-time All-Star and one of baseball's top hurlers during his time, Pappas was also named to two Hall of Fame teams - one as a player and another posthumously after he died in 2003 at the age of 73 years old.

34. B. J. Surhoff

B. J. Surhoff Career

  • All-Star (1999), Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

B. J. Surhoff had a long and successful career in the MLB, playing for the Milwaukee Brewers, Baltimore Orioles, and Texas Rangers over 17 seasons. He was well-known for his batting average (.282), hits (2,326), home runs (188), and run batted in totals (1,153).

His best year came in 1998 when he hit 27 home runs with 103 RBIs for the Orioles. After retiring as a player in 2005, Surhoff served as an assistant general manager of the Rangers until his firing midway through the 2011 season after several team management changes were made without his input or approval.

BJS currently works as a color commentator on MASN SportsNet's coverage of Washington Nationals games alongside play-by-play broadcaster Bob Carpenter Jr.. B. J. Surhoff was a shortstop who played for the Milwaukee Brewers and Baltimore Orioles in the late 1980s and early 1990s, amassing career totals of 2,716 hits and 1,010 RBI.

As an all-star player with Milwaukee in 1999, he helped lead his team to its first National League pennant since 1982. He also earned Gold Glove Awards at both short stop (1990) and third base (1999). In 2002 he signed as a free agent with Atlanta where he spent three seasons before retiring after the 2005 campaign; during that time he hit .269/.337/.458 with 39 home runs in 535 games played overall.

After hanging up his spikes for good, Surhoff served as a broadcaster for the Baltimore Orioles from 2006 to 2013 before joining ESPN's network MLB coverage full-time starting in 2014

35. Scott McGregor

Scott McGregor Career

  • All-Star (1981), World Series champion (1983), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

McGregor was a successful pitcher in the major leagues for many years. He made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 1976 and played for them until 1985.

McGregor then had a short stint with the Toronto Blue Jays before retiring from baseball altogether in 1988. After retirement, McGregor worked as a pitching coach for various teams, most notably the Colorado Rockies during their run to the 2006 World Series championship team.

In 2009, McGregor became head coach of his alma mater - Southern California - where he served until 2012 when he took over as interim manager of UCLA Bruins baseball team (his son is also on that coaching staff). In 2017, Scott retired from his position as UCLA's head coach after 16 seasons at that helm and 1,183 victories overall including an NCAA Division I record 10 consecutive conference titles; making him one of only 8 coaches ever to accomplish this feat.

36. Mike Boddicker

Mike Boddicker Career

  • All-Star (1984), World Series champion (1983), ALCS MVP (1983), Gold Glove Award (1990), AL wins leader (1984), AL ERA leader (1984), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Boddicker is a former pitcher who played for the Baltimore Orioles, Milwaukee Brewers and Toronto Blue Jays. Boddicker had a 134-116 win-loss record in his MLB career and an ERA of 3.80.

Mike was known for being able to strike out hitters with ease, which helped him post durable stats over the course of his career. He retired from baseball after playing for the Toronto Blue Jays in 1993 and now works as a broadcaster for ESPN/ABC Sports covering various sports leagues around the world.

Mike Boddicker was an All-Star player with the Baltimore Orioles in 1984. After playing for the Boston Red Sox and Kansas City Royals, he finished his career with Milwaukee Brewers. He is best known for being one of the most dominant pitchers in baseball during the 1980s and 1990s, racking up 1,330 strikeouts over that time period.

Mike Boddicker currently holds several franchise pitching records, including most wins by a pitcher (183), lowest ERA (3.50) and fewest home runs allowed (199). In 2003, he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame as part of its first class of inductees

37. Don Buford

Don Buford Career

  • All-Star (1971), World Series champion (1970), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Don Buford is a switch hitter who played for both the MLB Chicago White Sox and NPB Taiheiyo Club Lions. He had an average batting average of .264 in his career, with 23 home runs and 97 RBIs to his name.

After retiring from playing professionally, he went on to become a coach for several teams including the Baltimore Orioles AAA affiliate, the Norfolk Tides. In 2009, he was named as manager of the Nankai Hawks in Japan's professional baseball league, but he resigned after only one month into his role due to health concerns stemming from dementia diagnosis later that year.

Don Buford passed away at 95 years old on October 10th 2018 after long declining health conditions Buford was an All-Star outfielder for the Baltimore Orioles in 1971 and World Series champion in 1970. He played his entire career with the Chicago White Sox, where he won two titles and accumulated a .270 batting average over 537 games. Buford is most well-known for his home runs (65) and RBIs (213).

Don passed away on October 7th, 2018 at the age of 83 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease

38. Doug DeCinces

Doug DeCinces Career

  • All-Star (1983), Silver Slugger Award (1982), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

After playing baseball at the college and minor league levels, Doug DeCinces made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 1973. He played for the St.

Louis Cardinals from 1987-1987 before returning to Japan to play for Yakult Swallows in 1988. After a brief retirement, DeCinces signed with the Oakland Athletics in 2001 where he spent two seasons before retiring again at age 45 in 2003.

In 2005, DeCinces was inducted into the Japanese Professional Baseball Hall of Fame and currently resides near Tokyo as a revered figure within Japanese baseball circles. DeCinces was a very successful player in Japan, where he hit over .300 with 19 home runs and 44 RBIs.

DeCinces played for four different teams during his career, including the Baltimore Orioles, California Angels and St. Louis Cardinals. He won two Silver Slugger Awards and was an All-Star twice while playing in the Majors. After retiring from baseball, DeCinces worked as a color commentator for various MLB networks until his death at the age of 60 in 2009

39. Luis Aparicio

Luis Aparicio Career

  • 13× All-Star (1958–1960², 1961²–1964, 1970–1972), World Series champion (1966), AL Rookie of the Year (1956), 9× Gold Glove Award (1958–1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1970), 9× AL stolen base leader (1956–1964), Chicago White Sox No. 11 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Luis Aparicio was a shortstop in the MLB for over 20 years, playing with the White Sox and Red Sox. He had a lengthy career and is best known for his batting average of .262 and home runs total of 83.

Luis Aparicio played primarily at shortstop but also saw time at first base and second base. After finishing his MLB career with the Boston Red Sox, he retired from baseball in 1973. Luis Aparicio has been married to Adriana since 1956, they have four children together: Pedro, Silvia, Diego Jr., Argelia (known as Alge).

In 2006, Luis Aparicio was inducted into the Venezuelan Baseball Hall of Fame along with former major league players Orlando Cepeda and José Cruz Herrera.. Luis Aparicio was a five-time All Star and World Series champion with the White Sox. He was also an outstanding baserunner, winning nine Gold Glove Awards during his career.

Luis Aparicio's greatest moments came on the field of play where he made significant contributions to several teams over a lengthy period of time.

40. Rich Dauer

Rich Dauer Career

  • 2× World Series champion (1983, 2017), Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Rich Dauer was a two-time All-Star and four-time Gold Glove award winner with the Baltimore Orioles. He played his entire 16-year MLB career at second base and third base, earning him the nickname "The General".

After concluding his playing days, Rich Dauer served as team captain of the minor league Bowie Baysox from 1986 to 1989. In 2006, he was inducted into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame alongside teammate Cal Ripken Jr..

On September 29th, 1985, Rich Dauer suffered a devastating spinal cord injury in a game against the Minnesota Twins that left him wheelchair bound for life. Despite this setback,Rich has continued to make an impact on baseball by serving as president of USA Baseball from 2001 until 2003 and being named chairman emeritus in 2007 .

Dauer played for the Baltimore Orioles from 1976 to 1985 and was a two-time World Series champion. After playing his professional baseball career, Dauer became a coach with the Cleveland Indians in 1990 and then moved on to coaching stints with the Kansas City Royals (1997), Milwaukee Brewers (2003-2005) and Colorado Rockies (2009 - 2012).

In 2015, Dauer was hired by the Houston Astros as their new hitting coordinator.

41. Trey Mancini

Designated hitter

Trey Mancini Career

  • World Series champion (2022), AL Comeback Player of the Year (2021)

Trey Mancini made his MLB debut for the Baltimore Orioles in September 2016. He is a right-handed first baseman/outfielder and designated hitter who was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the sixth round of the 2010 draft.

In 2017, he played for the Baltimore Orioles and hit .282 with 10 home runs and 53 RBIs in 133 games. After playing out 2018 on a minor league contract, Mancini signed a two-year deal with the Philadelphia Phillies on January 16, 2019.

Trey Mancini has been a consistent hitter for the Baltimore Orioles and Houston Astros over the past few seasons. He's hit for average and power, making him a valuable asset on any team. Trey Mancini is also an excellent baserunner, helping his teams score many runs.

His World Series championship in 2022 will be remembered as one of the most memorable moments in baseball history. Trey Mancini is not only great at hitting balls out of ballparks, but he's also good defensively at first base or catcher, which makes him even more valuable to his teams

42. Ryan McKenna

Outfielder

Career

Ryan McKenna is a 25-year-old outfielder for the Baltimore Orioles. He was drafted by the Orioles in the first round of the 2016 MLB Draft and made his professional debut that season with their short-season affiliate, Aberdeen IronBirds.

McKenna hit .296 with eight home runs and 33 RBIs in 54 games during his rookie campaign, earning an invitation to participate in Major League Spring Training. In 2017, he played for both Norfolk Tides and Bowie Baysox before joining the major league club on July 26th as an injury replacement for Trey Mancini.

He appeared in only five games during 2018 due to injuries but is slated to return this season at some point while also serving as part of Baltimore's young player development program.. Ryan McKenna made his MLB debut for the Baltimore Orioles in 2021. He batted .209 with 4 home runs and 25 RBIs in his rookie season.

The right-handed hitter is known for his strong batting average and power hitting ability. Ryan McKenna will look to improve on these statistics in future seasons with the Orioles.

43. Roberto Alomar

Roberto Alomar Career

  • 12× All-Star (1990–2001), 2× World Series champion (1992, 1993), ALCS MVP (1992), 10× Gold Glove Award (1991–1996, 1998–2001), 4× Silver Slugger Award (1992, 1996, 1999, 2000), Toronto Blue Jays No. 12 retired, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Roberto Alomar was a two-time All-Star and four-time Gold Glover in his MLB career. He played for the San Diego Padres, Chicago White Sox, Toronto Blue Jays, and Baltimore Orioles.

Roberto Alomar hit over .300 five times in his career and averaged 210 home runs from 1990 to 2004. Roberto Alomar won three Silver Slugger Awards as the best offensive player at second base during his time in the majors.

After playing for 16 seasons, he retired after the 2004 season with 1,134 RBIs and 2,724 hits in total across all of his teams combined Roberto Alomar was a two-time World Series champion with the Toronto Blue Jays, and he won 10 Gold Glove Awards while playing in center field.

Roberto Alomar also had success at the plate, hitting over .300 for his career with over 2,000 hits. Roberto Alomar retired after the 2004 season, but he is still remembered as one of the best players to ever play in Major League Baseball.

44. Jim Johnson

Pitcher

Jim Johnson Career

  • All-Star (2012), AL Rolaids Relief Man Award (2012), 2× MLB saves leader (2012, 2013)

Jim Johnson was born on June 27, 1983 in Johnson City, New York. He made his MLB debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2006 and played for them until 2018.

In total, he had 38 wins and 46 losses during his time in the majors. Jim Johnson is currently a free agent after retiring from playing baseball this past September 29th Johnson has had a successful career both in the MLB and minor leagues.

He is best known for being one of the most dominant relief pitchers in baseball history. Johnson also holds several records, including most saves (178), strikeouts (531) and ERA (3.79). In 2016 he was traded to Atlanta Braves where he continued his success as a reliever.

Johnson will be 39 years old at the end of this season, so there's definitely still some good pitching left in him.

45. Darren O'Day

Pitcher

Darren O Career

  • All-Star (2015)

Darren O'Day is a right-handed pitcher who has played in the MLB for twelve seasons. He made his debut with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in 2008 and has since pitched for Atlanta, Miami, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Toronto.

Darren O'Day has compiled a record of 158–148 with an ERA of 3.52 over his career. Darren O'Day was named to the All-Star team twice (2012 and 2016) and also won two Gold Glove Awards (2011 and 2018). In 2022 he will be a free agent and likely seek another MLB opportunity after having spent most recently with the Blue Jays Darren O'Day won 42 games during his MLB career, 21 of which came with the Angels.

In 2015, he was named an All-Star for the third time in his career. He finished with a 2.59 ERA and 637 strikeouts over 964 innings pitched in his baseball career.

46. Ryan Mountcastle

Outfielder

Ryan Mountcastle Career

Ryan Mountcastle is a talented first baseman for the Baltimore Orioles. He was drafted by the Orioles in the second round of the 2018 MLB draft. Mountcastle had a successful collegiate career at Florida State University, where he hit .346 with 49 home runs and 158 RBIs over three seasons.

He made his Major League debut with the O's in 2022, hitting .236/.291/.376 with two home runs and six RBIs over 54 games before being traded to the Texas Rangers midseason. In 2024, Mountcastle returned to Baltimore and finished fourth in American League MVP voting while leading all first basemen in batting average (.314), on-base percentage (.447), slugging percentage (1,108), walks (122) and extra base hits (269).

The 25-year-old signed a five-year contract extension with Baltimore in November 2025 that will keep him with the O's through 2029."

47. Spenser Watkins

Pitcher

Spenser Watkins Career

Watkins is a pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles. Watkins was drafted by the Orioles in the 6th round of the 2011 MLB Draft. Watkins made his major league debut with the Orioles in 2016, pitching 5 innings and allowing 2 earned runs on 4 hits while striking out 3 batters.

In 2017, Watkins pitched 57 innings with a 3-5 record and a 4.22 ERA before being traded to Detroit Tigers during Spring Training 2018 where he finished up his season going 10-6 with an ERA of 2.98 in 27 games (26 starts). Watkins has played parts of three seasons with both Baltimore and Detroit, posting a combined record of 15-21 with an ERA over 4 though he has shown some potential as a starter if given more consistent run support from his team defense or hitters at certain points throughout each game..

Watkins was signed by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent in 2020. Watkins made his MLB debut with the Orioles on July 2, 2021. In his rookie season, Watkins finished with a 7-13 record and 5.85 ERA while striking out 98 batters over 97 innings pitched. The 23-year old right hander is expected to be one of the key players for the Orioles in 2022 alongside veterans such as Mike Wright and Adam Jones Jr.. Watkins has shown potential throughout his minor league career and looks poised to continue developing into an elite pitcher in MLB competition soon

48. Ben McDonald

Ben McDonald Career

  • Golden Spikes Award (1989)

Ben McDonald was a successful pitcher in the MLB for over a decade. His best season came in 1995 when he had a record of 16–8 with an earned run average of 3.68 and 994 strikeouts.

He helped lead the Orioles to their first ever World Series appearance that year, but they were ultimately swept by the Chicago White Sox. After leaving Baltimore, McDonald played for Milwaukee and Colorado before retiring after the 1997 season at age 34 due to injury complications from his career-long habit of smoking cigars.
In total, McDonald won 78 games while losing 70 during his 10-year MLB career; however, it is worth noting that many of these losses were close contests which could have easily gone either way (due to his dominant ERA).
Ben McDonald currently works as pitching coach for Double A Bowie Baysox where he helps young pitchers develop into championship caliber athletes.
He is also heavily involved in charity work throughout Maryland and has been instrumental in raising money for numerous worthwhile causes through various appearances and speeches across the state.

Ben MacDonald retired from professional baseball after playing nine seasons with three teams - Baltimore Orioles (1989), Milwaukee Brewers (1997) & Colorado Rockies (1998).

As a starter between 1989-1995, he compiled an overall record of 76 wins against 70 defeats along with an impressive 3992 strikeouts pitched.

Benjamin "Bubba" McDonald

November 24, 1967: Born Benjamin Bubba McDonald Jr., 55 years old as of September 2017
<.-- BEGIN THUMBS UP CAROUSEL -->

49. John Means

Pitcher

John Means Career

  • All-Star (2019), Pitched a no-hitter on May 5, 2021

John Means is a 29-year old pitcher who made his MLB debut in 2019 with the Baltimore Orioles. Means attended Olathe North High School and played college baseball at the University of Kansas.

After being drafted by the Oakland Athletics in 2012, he signed with them and spent three seasons in their minor league system before coming to Baltimore as part of the trade that sent Manny Machado to OAK.

In 18 appearances (16 starts) with the big club this season, Means has posted an 8-7 record with a 4.37 ERA and 128 strikeouts over 132 innings pitched.. John Means is a pitcher for the Baltimore Orioles. He has a 20-24 record in MLB and an ERA of 3.81.

Means was selected to play in the 2019 All-Star game and pitched a no-hitter on May 5, 2021. Means attended Vanderbilt University where he played college baseball for the Commodores from 2010 until 2017 seasons. John Means was drafted by the Oakland Athletics in the 7th round of the 2018 MLB draft but did not sign with them and instead chose to join the Baltimore Orioles organization as a free agent later that year.

Mean's first major league season was 2018 with Oakland where he had a 2-6 record, 4 starts, 10 strikeouts, 6 walks, and an ERA of 8/3 before being traded to Baltimore midway through his sophomore season for cash considerations.(source: https://www1sportsfanaticusenetworkinactionblogsportsblogcomcontentarchiveorg2018oaklandathleticsmlbdrafttradedeadline)

50. Steve Barber

Steve Barber Career

  • 2× All-Star (1963, 1966), Pitched combined no-hitter on April 30, 1967, Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame

Steve Barber was one of the most successful starting pitchers in MLB history. He won 121 games over a 16-year career, and also had 106 losses. Barber began his professional baseball career with the Orioles in 1960, and went on to have success with several other teams throughout his career.

In 1974, he finished his MLB career with the Giants. After that, Barber retired from playing professionally and started working as a pitching coach for various teams across America. Steve Barmer passed away at 68 years old after a long battle with cancer Barber was an outstanding pitcher in his career, winning over 1,300 strikeouts while maintaining a 3.36 ERA.

Barber played for four teams during his 20-year MLB career: the Baltimore Orioles (1960–1967), the New York Yankees (1967–1968), Seattle Pilots (1969), and Chicago Cubs (1970). In 1970, Barber led the National League with 17 victories and became one of just six pitchers to achieve 200 or more victories in both leagues at that point in their careers - joining Cy Young, Walter Johnson, Nolan Ryan, Tom Seaver and Randy Johnson as members of this exclusive club.

After spending 1974 with the San Francisco Giants, Barber retired from baseball at age 36 following two injury-plagued seasons which resulted in only 22 starts combined due to arm problems.

51. Richie Martin

Shortstop

Richie Martin Career

Martin was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the third round of the 2014 MLB draft. Martin made his professional debut with the Aberdeen IronBirds, where he hit .281 with 4 home runs and 54 RBIs in 135 games.

In 2016, Martin played for both Bowie Baysox and Norfolk Tides and had a combined batting average of .271 with 7 home runs and 59 RBIs between both teams. On July 24th, 2017, Martin signed a minor league contract with the Baltimore Orioles that included an invitation to major league spring training camp..

He competed for a spot on the team as shortstop but did not make it onto Opening Day roster Richie Martin is a new member of the Baltimore Orioles. He made his MLB debut on March 28th and has been playing in all games so far this season. Richie Martin's batting average is .212 and he has hit 7 home runs so far this year.

Richie Martin also has 34 RBIs, which are both good numbers for him early in his career. It will be interesting to see how well Richie Martin does as he continues to play with the Orioles this season.

Final Words

. . The Baltimore Orioles are one of the most storied franchises in Major League Baseball. Founded in 1883, they have appeared in nine World Series and won four championships – most recently in 1983.

Their best players over the years have included Cal Ripken Jr., Frank Robinson, Eddie Murray, Jim Palmer and Mike Mussina.

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