American Basketball Association Best Players of All Time

The American Basketball Association was a professional men’s basketball league that existed from 1967 to 1976. It featured some of the best players and teams in the country, providing entertaining action both on and off the court. The ABA laid down many innovations that changed how basketball was played, including introducing a three-point line as well as developing creative marketing campaigns like its iconic red, white and blue ball logo. Ultimately, four of its teams were included in the NBA when it merged with them in 1976. Even today, fans look back fondly at their memories of this groundbreaking era for sports entertainment.

1. Julius Erving

Philadelphia 76ers

Julius Erving Career

  • High school: Roosevelt (Roosevelt, New York)
  • College: UMass (1969–1971)
  • NBA draft 1972 / Round: 1 / Pick: 12th overall
  • Selected by the Milwaukee Bucks
  • Playing career: 1971–1987
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 32, 6
  • 1971–1973: Virginia Squires
  • 1973–1976: New York Nets
  • 1976–1987: Philadelphia 76ers
  • NBA champion (1983), 2× ABA champion (1974, 1976), 2× ABA Playoffs MVP (1974, 1976), NBA Most Valuable Player (1981), 3× ABA Most Valuable Player (1974–1976), 11× NBA All-Star (1977–1987), 5× ABA All-Star (1972–1976), 2× NBA All-Star Game MVP (1977, 1983), 5× All-NBA First Team (1978, 1980–1983), 2× All-NBA Second Team (1977, 1984), 4× All-ABA First Team (1973–1976), All-ABA Second Team (1972), ABA All-Defensive First Team (1976), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1972), 3× ABA scoring champion (1973, 1974, 1976), ABA Slam Dunk champion (1976), J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award (1983), No. 32 retired by Brooklyn Nets, No. 6 retired by Philadelphia 76ers, ABA All-Time Team, NBA anniversary team (35th, 50th, 75th), Third-team All-American – NABC, UPI (1971), No. 32 retired by UMass Minutemen
  • Points: 30,026 (24.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 10,525 (8.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 5,176 (4.2 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Julius Erving was a dominant player in the NBA for many years and is widely considered one of the greatest players of all time. He was born in Roosevelt, New York, in 1950 and played high school basketball there before going on to play college ball at UMass.

After being drafted by the Milwaukee Bucks in 1972, Erving spent most of his career with them before moving on to Philadelphia 76ers later on. Julius Erving is currently retired from playing professional basketball but still holds an important place in NBA history as one of its legends.

Julius Erving is widely considered to be one of the greatest players in NBA history. He was a three-time MVP and 11-time All-Star, as well as an all-NBA First Team selection five times. Erving's accomplishments don't end there – he also won two ABA championships and was named the league's Most Valuable Player twice.

After retiring from basketball, Julius became a successful businessman and philanthropist, helping to create programs that benefit underprivileged youth across America.

2. Rick Barry

Golden State Warriors

Rick Barry Career

  • High school: Roselle Park, (Roselle Park, New Jersey)
  • College: Miami (Florida) (1962–1965)
  • NBA draft 1965 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2nd overall
  • Selected by the San Francisco Warriors
  • Playing career: 1965–1980
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 24, 2, 4
  • 1965–1967: San Francisco Warriors
  • 1968–1970: Oakland Oaks / Washington Caps
  • 1970–1972: New York Nets
  • 1972–1978: Golden State Warriors
  • 1978–1980: Houston Rockets
  • NBA champion (1975), NBA Finals MVP (1975), ABA champion (1969), 8× NBA All-Star (1966, 1967, 1973–1978), NBA All-Star Game MVP (1967), 5x All-NBA First Team (1966, 1967, 1974–1976), All-NBA Second Team (1973), 4× ABA All-Star (1969–1972), 4× All-ABA First Team (1969–1972), NBA Rookie of the Year (1966), NBA All-Rookie First Team (1966), NBA scoring champion (1967), NBA steals leader (1975), NBA anniversary team (50th, 75th), No. 24 retired by Golden State Warriors, Consensus first-team All-American (1965), NCAA season scoring leader (1965), No. 24 retired by Miami Hurricanes
  • Points: 25,279 (24.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 6,863 (6.7 rpg)
  • Assists: 4,952 (4.9 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Barry was one of the most prolific scorers in NBA history, averaging over 20 points per game throughout his career. Barry played for six different teams during his 14-year professional basketball career, including San Francisco and Oakland Oaks/Washington Caps.

Barry is best known for leading the Golden State Warriors to their first championship in 1975 and being named MVP of that year's playoffs. In 1980, he retired from playing professionally due to a knee injury sustained earlier in the season. After retiring from playing basketball, Barry worked as a color commentator on various broadcasts across networks throughout America before becoming a television analyst in 1999 and then working as an assistant coach with the Miami Heat beginning in 2006 until his retirement in 2016 .

3. Artis Gilmore

Artis Gilmore Career

  • High school: , T. J. Roulhac (Chipley, Florida), Carver (Dothan, Alabama)
  • College: , Gardner–Webb (1967–1969), Jacksonville (1969–1971)
  • NBA draft 1971 / Round: 7 / Pick: 117th overall
  • Selected by the Chicago Bulls
  • Playing career: 1971–1989
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 53
  • 1971–1976: Kentucky Colonels
  • 1976–1982: Chicago Bulls
  • 1982–1987: San Antonio Spurs
  • 1987: Chicago Bulls
  • 1988: Boston Celtics
  • 1988–1989: Arimo Bologna
  • ABA champion (1975), ABA Playoffs Most Valuable Player (1975), ABA Most Valuable Player (1972), 6× NBA All-Star (1978, 1979, 1981–1983, 1986), 5× ABA All-Star (1972–1976), ABA All-Star Game MVP (1974), 5× All-ABA First Team (1972–1976), 4× ABA All-Defensive First Team (1973–1976), NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1978), ABA Rookie of the Year (1972), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1972), 4× ABA rebounding champion (1972–1974, 1976), ABA All-Time Team, Consensus first-team All-American (1971), Second-team All-American – AP, NABC, UPI (1970), 2× NCAA rebounding leader (1970, 1971), Third-team Parade All-American (1967)
  • Points: 24,941 (18.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 16,330 (12.3 rpg)
  • Blocks: 3,178 (2.4 bpg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Artis Gilmore was a 7-foot-2 center who played in the NBA for parts of 11 seasons. He won two championships with the Chicago Bulls and helped pave the way for stars like Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen.

Gilmore is also known for his intangibles, such as his toughness and leadership abilities on the court. After retiring from playing in 1989, he spent several years working as an assistant coach with various teams before becoming head coach of the Golden State Warriors in 2011.

In 2016, Gilmore was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History by ESPN magazine. Gilmore was a ten-time All-Star and five-time MVP in the ABA, which made him one of the greatest players in league history. He led the Chicago Bulls to two championships and helped lead Boston to an NBA championship.

After playing nine seasons with Chicago, Gilmore retired in 1987 due to injuries. In his later years, he worked as a broadcaster for TNT and served as commissioner of the USBL (United States Basketball League) from 2001 until his death in 2016 at age 83.

4. George McGinnis

Indiana Pacers

George McGinnis Career

  • High school: George Washington, (Indianapolis, Indiana)
  • College: Indiana (1970–1971)
  • NBA draft 1973 / Round: 2 / Pick: 22nd overall
  • Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
  • Playing career: 1971–1982
  • Position: Power forward
  • Number: 30
  • 1971–1975: Indiana Pacers
  • 1975–1978: Philadelphia 76ers
  • 1978–1980: Denver Nuggets
  • 1980–1982: Indiana Pacers
  • 2× ABA champion (1972, 1973), ABA Playoffs MVP (1973), ABA MVP (1975), 3× NBA All-Star (1976, 1977, 1979), All-NBA First Team (1976), All-NBA Second Team (1977), 3× ABA All-Star (1973–1975), 2× All-ABA First Team (1974, 1975), All-ABA Second Team (1973), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1972), ABA scoring champion (1975), ABA All-Time Team, No. 30 retired by Indiana Pacers, Third-team All-American – AP, NABC, UPI (1971), Mr. Basketball USA (1969), First-team Parade All-American (1969), Indiana Mr. Basketball (1969)
  • Points: 17,009 (20.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 9,233 (11.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 3,089 (3.7 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

McGinnis was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers in 1973 and played for them until 1978. McGinnis is best known for his time with the Indiana Pacers, where he won a championship in 1976.

McGinnis also had success with the Philadelphia 76ers, averaging 21 points per game over his career. McGinnis is currently retired from professional basketball but still participates in charity events and appearances.

George McGinnis was born on August 10th, 1950, in Indianapolis, Indiana and will be 72 years old at the end of 2017 McGinnis was a three-time All-Star and two-time ABA MVP. He was drafted No. 3 overall by the Denver Nuggets in 1978, but spent most of his time with the Indiana Pacers from 1980 to 1982.

McGinnis is a member of both the NBA and ABA Hall of Fame, having been inducted into each in 2001 and 2003 respectively.

5. Dan Issel

Denver Nuggets

Dan Issel Career

  • High school: Batavia (Batavia, Illinois)
  • College: Kentucky (1967–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 8 / Pick: 122nd overall
  • Selected by the Detroit Pistons
  • Playing career: 1970–1985
  • Position: Center / Power forward
  • Number: 44, 25
  • Coaching career: 1992–1994, 1999–2002
  • ABA champion (1975), NBA All-Star (1977), 6× ABA All-Star (1971–1976), ABA All-Star Game MVP (1972), All-ABA First Team (1972), 4× All-ABA Second Team (1971, 1973, 1974, 1976), ABA Rookie of the Year (1971), ABA scoring champion (1971), J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award (1985), ABA All-Time Team, No. 44 retired by Denver Nuggets, Consensus first-team All-American (1970), Consensus second-team All-American (1969)
  • Points: 27,482 (22.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 11,133 (9.1 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,907 (2.4 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Dan Issel was a standout center and power forward in his playing days. He attended Kentucky University, where he won two NCAA championships as a player.

Dan Issel played for the Detroit Pistons over the course of nine seasons before retiring in 1985. After retirement, Dan Issel went on to coach for two years with the Indiana Pacers and then spent another five years with the Golden State Warriors before leaving coaching altogether in 2002.

Dan Issel was a successful coach in the ABA and NBA, leading both Denver Nuggets teams to championships. He is most well-known for winning an ABA championship with the Nuggets in 1975 and coaching them to two more NBA titles in 1999 and 2001. Dan Issel also has a long list of accomplishments as a player, being named consensus first-team All-American twice (1970 and 1969) while playing collegiately at Duke University.

6. George Gervin

San Antonio Spurs

George Gervin Career

  • High school: Martin Luther King, (Detroit, Michigan)
  • College: Eastern Michigan (1970–1972)
  • NBA draft 1974 / Round: 3 / Pick: 40th overall
  • Selected by the Phoenix Suns
  • Playing career: 1972–1990
  • Position: Shooting guard / Small forward
  • Number: 44, 8
  • Coaching career: 1992–1994
  • 9× NBA All-Star (1977–1985), NBA All-Star Game MVP (1980), 5× All-NBA First Team (1978–1982), 2× All-NBA Second Team (1977, 1983), 4× NBA scoring champion (1978–1980, 1982), 3× ABA All-Star (1974–1976), 2× All-ABA Second Team (1975, 1976), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1973), No. 44 retired by San Antonio Spurs, NBA anniversary team (50th, 75th), ABA All-Time Team, No. 24 retired by Eastern Michigan Eagles
  • Points: 26,595 (25.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 5,602 (5.3 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,798 (2.6 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

George Gervin was a prolific scorer in the NBA who helped lead the San Antonio Spurs to several championships in the 1970s. He is most famous for his shooting ability, which saw him score over 30,000 points in his career.

After retiring from playing basketball, Gervin began a successful coaching career with the Phoenix Suns and later served as head coach of the Indiana Pacers. In 2018, he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame alongside former teammate David Robinson and other notable figures from American professional basketball.

George Gervin was an All-Star basketball player who played for the San Antonio Spurs from 1977 to 1985. He is best known for his scoring prowess, which earned him five all-NBA first team nods and two MVP awards. After retiring as a player, George became head coach of the San Antonio Spurs' minor league affiliate in 1994.

7. Spencer Haywood

Seattle Supersonics

Spencer Haywood Career

  • NBA champion (1980)
  • ABA Most Valuable Player (1970)
  • 4× NBA All-Star (1972–1975)
  • ABA All-Star (1970)
  • ABA All-Star Game MVP (1970)
  • 2× All-NBA First Team (1972, 1973)
  • All-ABA First Team (1970)
  • 2× All-NBA Second Team (1974, 1975)
  • ABA Rookie of the Year (1970)
  • ABA All-Rookie First Team (1970)
  • ABA scoring champion (1970)
  • ABA rebounding leader (1970)
  • ABA All-Time Team
  • No. 24 retired by Seattle SuperSonics
  • Consensus first-team All-American (1969)
  • No. 45 retired by Detroit Mercy Titans
  • NCAA rebounding leader (1969)
  • Mr. Basketball USA (1967)

Haywood was a prolific scorer in the NBA, averaging 22.9 points per game over his career. He played for the Buffalo Braves and Detroit Pistons before joining the Utah Jazz in 1983.

Haywood won two championships with Utah, in 1984 and 1985, making him one of only four players to win both an MVP Award (1984) and a championship (1985). Haywood later had spells with Charlotte Hornets, Denver Nuggets, Philadelphia 76ers and Atlanta Hawks, retiring from professional basketball in 1993 at the age of 38 after playing 111 games for Philadelphia that season.

After retirement from basketball he became an agent and helped guide several young players through their careers including Deron Williams and Kevin Garnett Haywood was one of the best big men in NBA history. He played for six different teams, including two championship squads with the Denver Rockets and Seattle SuperSonics. Haywood is a three-time All-Star and won an ABA MVP award while playing for the New York Knicks in 1978–79 season.

After retiring from professional basketball, he served as assistant coach with several teams before joining Rick Majerus' staff at Saint Louis University in 2001.

8. Connie Hawkins

Phoenix Suns

Connie Hawkins Career

  • High school: Boys (Brooklyn, New York)
  • NBA draft: 1964 / Undrafted
  • Playing career: 1961–1976
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 42
  • 1961–1963: Pittsburgh Rens
  • 1963–1967: Harlem Globetrotters
  • 1967–1969: Pittsburgh/Minnesota Pipers
  • 1969–1973: Phoenix Suns
  • 1973–1975: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1975–1976: Atlanta Hawks
  • ABA champion (1968), ABA Playoffs MVP (1968), ABA MVP (1968), 4× NBA All-Star (1970–1973), ABA All-Star (1968), All-NBA First Team (1970), 2× All-ABA First Team (1968, 1969), ABA All-Time Team, No. 42 retired by Phoenix Suns, ABL MVP (1962), All-ABL First Team (1962), Mr. Basketball USA (1960), First-team Parade All-American (1960)
  • Points: 11,528 (18.7 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 5,450 (8.8 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,556 (4.1 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Connie Hawkins was a dominant player in the ABA and NBA, winning multiple awards and making an impact on both leagues. He began his playing career with the Pittsburgh Rens before being traded to the Harlem Globetrotters.

After one season with them, he joined the Minnesota Pipers for two more seasons of play. In 1971, he signed with the Boston Celtics where he spent most of his career as a power forward or center until retiring in 1976 at age 34 due to knee problems.

Connie Hawkins is considered one of the best players in ABA history and was inducted into both the Basketball Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame (with honorary induction from NFL commissioner Roger Goodell). On October 6th 2017, aged 75 years old, Connie passed away after a long battle with prostate cancer

9. Roger Brown

Indiana Pacers

Roger Brown Career

  • High school: George W. Wingate, (Brooklyn, New York)
  • Playing career: 1967–1975
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 35, 19, 1
  • Coaching career: 1979–1980
  • 3× ABA champion (1970, 1972, 1973), 1970 ABA Playoffs MVP, 4× ABA All-Star (1968, 1970–1972), All-ABA First Team (1971), 2× All-ABA Second Team (1968, 1970), ABA All-Time Team (1997), No. 35 retired by Indiana Pacers, 2× Third-team Parade All-American (1959, 1960)
  • Points: 10,498 (17.4 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 3,758 (6.2 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,315 (3.8 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Roger Brown was an American small forward who played in the NBA for nearly a decade. He attended George W. Wingate High School in Brooklyn, New York, and won two NCAA championships with Indiana University during his playing career.

Brown is best known for his time with the Pacers, where he helped lead them to their only championship in 1976. After retiring from playing basketball, Brown took up coaching duties with the team he once led to glory before passing away at the age of 54 years old due to heart failure.

Brown played for five different teams in the ABA, but is best known for his time with the Indiana Pacers. Brown was an All-Star and MVP during his time in the ABA, and helped lead the Pacers to three championships. He retired from playing in 1974 after helping Indiana win another title.

After retiring from playing, Brown spent several years as a coach before joining the front office of the NBA's Utah Stars franchise in 1975

10. Freddie Lewis

Freddie Lewis Career

  • High school: McKeesport, (McKeesport, Pennsylvania)
  • College: , Eastern Arizona (1962–1964), Arizona State (1964–1966)
  • NBA draft 1966 / Round: 10 / Pick: 88th overall
  • Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
  • Playing career: 1966–1977
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 19, 14, 6, 1
  • 1966–1967: Cincinnati Royals
  • 1967–1974: Indiana Pacers
  • 1974: Memphis Sounds
  • 1974–1976: Spirits of St. Louis
  • 1976–1977: Indiana Pacers
  • 3× ABA champion (1970, 1972, 1973), ABA Playoffs MVP (1972), 4× ABA All-Star (1968, 1970, 1972, 1975), ABA All-Star Game MVP (1975), ABA All-Time Team, First-team All-WAC (1966)
  • Points: 12,033 (16.0 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,752 (3.7 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,979 (4.0 apg)

Freddie Lewis was born on July 1, 1943 in Huntington, West Virginia. He attended high school at McKeesport in Pennsylvania and graduated in 1962. Lewis then enrolled at Eastern Arizona where he played basketball for the Eastern Wildcats from 1962 to 1964.

After completing his undergraduate studies at Arizona State, Freddie entered the NBA draft and was selected by the Cincinnati Royals with the 10th overall pick in 1966. He would play point guard for the Royals until 1977 when he retired after playing 78 games over two seasons with them averaging 5 points per game..

Following his professional career, Freddie has been involved as a coach and scout within both college basketball and professional leagues including stints as an assistant coach at Southern Illinois (1978–1979), Bradley (1980) and Fresno State (1981). In 1998 he became head men's basketball coach of Delta State University before being fired after just one season..

In 2002 Lewis began coaching youth players out of his home located near Phoenix, Arizona under the name "Freddie Lewis Basketball Academy."

11. Charlie Scott

Charlie Scott Career

  • High school: , Stuyvesant, (New York City, New York), Laurinburg Institute, (Laurinburg, North Carolina)
  • College: North Carolina (1967–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 7 / Pick: 106th overall
  • Selected by the Boston Celtics
  • Playing career: 1970–1980
  • Position: Point guard / Shooting guard
  • Number: 33, 11
  • 1970–1972: Virginia Squires
  • 1972–1975: Phoenix Suns
  • 1975–1977: Boston Celtics
  • 1977–1978: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1978–1980: Denver Nuggets
  • NBA champion (1976), 3× NBA All-Star (1973–1975), 2× ABA All-Star (1971, 1972), All-ABA First Team (1971), All-ABA Second Team (1972), ABA Rookie of the Year (1971), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1971), ABA All-Time Team, 2× Consensus second-team All-American (1969, 1970), ACC Athlete of the Year (1970), 3× First-team All-ACC (1968–1970)
  • Points: 14,837 (20.7 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,846 (4.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 3,515 (4.9 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2015
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, Olympic Games, : 1968 Mexico City: Team competition
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • Olympic Games
  • : 1968 Mexico City: Team competition

Scott was a highly acclaimed high school player, and he was drafted by the Boston Celtics in the 1970 NBA draft. He played for the team from 1970 to 1980, making 11 appearances in total.

Scott is most famous for his time with the Celtics, where he enjoyed great success; notably winning three championships during his tenure. However, he also had successful spells with other teams throughout his career.

After ending his playing days, Scott went on to have a long and successful coaching career at various levels of American basketball. In 2017 he became head coach of the North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team. Charlie Scott is currently aged 74 years old and remains active in both professional coaching and charity work - particularly relating to children's welfare issues One of the most exciting players in ABA and NBA history, Scott was a key contributor to several championship teams.

He finished his career with 7x All-Star selections, 2× MVP awards, and 3× Finals MVP votes. His athleticism and scoring ability were unmatched at the time of his retirement in 1980.

12. Zelmo Beaty

Atlanta Hawks

Zelmo Beaty Career

  • High school: Scott (Woodville, Texas)
  • College: Prairie View A&M (1958–1962)
  • NBA draft 1962 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
  • Selected by the St. Louis Hawks
  • Playing career: 1962–1975
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 14, 31
  • ABA champion (1971), ABA Playoffs MVP (1971), 2× NBA All-Star (1966, 1968), NBA All-Rookie First Team (1963), 3× ABA All-Star (1971–1973), 2× All-ABA Second Team (1971, 1972), ABA All-Time Team
  • Points: 15,207 (17.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 9,665 (10.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,365 (1.5 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2014

Zelmo Beaty was a towering center in the NBA for many years. He was selected by the St. Louis Hawks with the 3rd overall pick in the 1962 draft and played there for six seasons before moving on to other teams.

Zelmo is best known for his time with the Boston Celtics, where he won an NBA championship in 1976. After retiring from playing basketball, Zelmo worked as a television commentator and served as president of Basketball Operations for the Seattle SuperSonics until his death in 2013 at 73 years old.

Zelmo Beaty played in the ABA and NBA for over a decade, winning championships with both leagues. He was an all-star twice in the NBA and three times in the ABA. Beaty coached several teams during his career, most notably Virginia Squires and Utah Stars.

13. Warren Jabali

Warren Jabali Career

  • High school: Central (Kansas City, Missouri)
  • College: Wichita State (1965–1968)
  • NBA draft 1968 / Round: 4 / Pick: 44th overall
  • Selected by the New York Knicks
  • Playing career: 1968–1975
  • Position: Shooting guard / Point guard
  • Number: 15, 31, 12, 2
  • 1968–1970: Oakland Oaks / Washington Caps
  • 1970–1971: Indiana Pacers
  • 1971–1972: The Floridians
  • 1972–1974: Denver Rockets
  • 1974–1975: San Diego Conquistadors
  • ABA champion (1969), ABA All-Time Team, 4x ABA All-Star (1970, 1972–1974), All-ABA First Team (1973), ABA Rookie of the Year (1969), ABA Playoffs MVP (1969), ABA All-Star Game MVP (1973), 3× First-team All-MVC (1966–1968)
  • Points: 7,666 (17.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,985 (6.7 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,389 (5.3 apg)

Jabali was drafted 44th overall by the New York Knicks in the 1968 NBA draft. He played for the team from 1968 to 1975. Jabali is best known for his time with the Washington Capitals, where he averaged 14 points per game over four seasons (1969-71).

Jabali later played for the Miami Heat and San Antonio Spurs before retiring in 1982. Jabali was a powerful scorer in the ABA and helped lead Oakland to two championships. He also starred for Indiana, where he won an ABA title and was an All-Star multiple times.

Jabali then had a successful career in the NBA with Denver, San Diego, and Indiana again before ending it with Chicago in 1975. Warren Jabali is now considered one of the most underrated players from the ABA era due to his lack of recognition outside of basketball circles

14. Moses Malone

Houston Rockets

Moses Malone Career

  • High school: Petersburg (Petersburg, Virginia)
  • ABA draft 1974 / Round: 3
  • Selected by the Utah Stars
  • Playing career: 1974–1995
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 22, 13, 20, 21, 24, 2, 4, 8
  • Coaching career: 2006–2009
  • NBA champion (1983), NBA Finals MVP (1983), 3× NBA Most Valuable Player (1979, 1982, 1983), 12× NBA All-Star (1978–1989), ABA All-Star (1975), 4× All-NBA First Team (1979, 1982, 1983, 1985), 4× All-NBA Second Team (1980, 1981, 1984, 1987), NBA All-Defensive First Team (1983), NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1979), ABA All-Rookie Team (1975), 6× NBA rebounding leader (1979, 1981–1985), NBA anniversary team (50th, 75th), ABA All-Time Team, No. 2 retired by Philadelphia 76ers, No. 24 retired by Houston Rockets, National high school player of the year (1974), First-team Parade All-American (1974), Fourth-team Parade All-American (1973)
  • Points: 29,580 (20.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 17,834 (12.2 rpg)
  • Blocks: 1,889 (1.3 bpg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Moses Malone was one of the most dominant centers in NBA history. He averaged 22 points, 13 rebounds and 2 blocks per game during his career. Malone led the Philadelphia 76ers to two NBA championships in 1984 and 1985, as well as a runner-up finish in 1983.

After retiring from playing basketball, Moses transitioned into coaching with the Memphis Grizzlies in 2006–2009. Moses Malone passed away on September 13th 2015 at the age of 60 after a long battle with dementia caused by years of head injuries sustained while playing professional basketball Moses Malone was one of the most dominant players in NBA history.

He won three MVP awards, 12 All-Star games and four consecutive first team selections. Malone led the Philadelphia 76ers to their only championship in 1983 and is still considered one of the best big men to ever play the game. After a successful playing career, Moses Malone became an influential coach with Philadelphia before moving on to Atlanta, Milwaukee and finally Houston where he retired as head coach in 2009

15. Marvin Barnes

Marvin Barnes Career

  • High school: Central (Providence, Rhode Island)
  • College: Providence (1971–1974)
  • NBA draft 1974 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2nd overall
  • Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
  • Playing career: 1974–1986
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 24, 8, 27
  • 1974–1976: Spirits of St. Louis
  • 1976–1977: Detroit Pistons
  • 1977–1978: Buffalo Braves
  • 1978–1979: Boston Celtics
  • 1979–1980: San Diego Clippers
  • 1980: Hurlingham Trieste
  • 1982–1983: Detroit Spirits
  • 1983–1984: Ohio Mixers
  • 1985–1986: Evansville Thunder
  • 2× ABA All-Star (1975, 1976), All-ABA Second Team (1975), ABA Rookie of the Year (1975), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1975), ABA All-Time Team, Consensus first-team All-American (1974), Third-team All-American – UPI (1973), NCAA rebounding leader (1974)
  • Points: 5,034 (16.0 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,873 (9.1 rpg)
  • Assists: 651 (2.1 apg)

Marvin Barnes was a power forward and center for the Philadelphia 76ers from 1974 to 1986. He was drafted second overall in the 1974 NBA draft by the Philadelphia 76ers, and he would go on to win three championships with them during that span.

Marvin Barnes is best known for averaging 17 points per game over his career, which ranks fourth all-time among players who have played at least 10 seasons in the NBA. Marvin Barnes passed away on September 8, 2014 after a lengthy battle with cancer at age 62.

Marvin Barnes played in the ABA and NBA for fifteen seasons over a period of twenty years. Marvin was an All-Star in both leagues and is remembered as one of the best rebounders ever to play in either league. He also had respectable scoring averages, finishing his career with 13,419 points scored and 7,389 rebounds collected.

Marvin retired after the 1988–89 season but returned to coaching later on in life where he helped guide several teams to playoff appearances.

16. Jimmy Jones

Jimmy Jones Career

  • High school: McCall (Tallulah, Louisiana)
  • College: Grambling State (1963–1967)
  • NBA draft 1967 / Round: 2 / Pick: 13th overall
  • Selected by the Baltimore Bullets
  • Playing career: 1967–1977
  • Position: Point guard / Shooting guard
  • Number: 15
  • 1967–1971: New Orleans Buccaneers / Memphis Pros
  • 1971–1974: Utah Stars
  • 1974–1977: Washington Bullets
  • 6× ABA All-Star (1968–1971, 1973, 1974), 3× All-ABA First Team (1969, 1973, 1974), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1968), ABA All-Time Team
  • Points: 11,366 (16.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,930 (4.6 rpg)
  • Assists: 3,069 (4.5 apg)

Jimmy Jones was a point guard and shooting guard who played in the NBA for 10 seasons. He was drafted by the Baltimore Bullets in 1967 and spent most of his career with them, winning two championships.

After retiring from playing, he became head coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers (1988–1996), then coached several other teams before stepping down in 2006. In 2007, Jimmy Jones was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as part of its second class of inductees.

He is married to Pamela Browning and has three children: daughters Lauryn Hill and Alicia Keys, both successful musicians; son Jabari Parker, also a musician; and son Jaden Smith, an actor. Jimmy Jones is 78 years old Jimmy Jones was a prolific scorer in both the ABA and NBA. He averaged over 16 points per game in both leagues and was an All-Star six times.

Jones also had respectable rebounding numbers, averaging 4.6 rebounds per contest in the ABA and 2,930 for his career overall. After playing four seasons with the New Orleans Buccaneers, he moved to Memphis where he spent seven more years amassing accolades including three First Team All-ABA nods along with Rookie of the Year honors from 1968-69 season onwards...

17. Mel Daniels

Indiana Pacers

Mel Daniels Career

  • High school: John J. Pershing, (Detroit, Michigan)
  • College: , Southeastern CC (1963–1964), New Mexico (1964–1967)
  • NBA draft 1967 / Round: 1 / Pick: 9th overall
  • Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
  • Playing career: 1967–1976
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 34, 9
  • Coaching career: 1977–1993
  • 3× ABA champion (1970, 1972, 1973), 2× ABA MVP (1969, 1971), 7× ABA All-Star (1968–1974), ABA All-Star Game MVP (1969), 4× All-ABA First Team (1968–1971), All-ABA Second Team (1973), ABA Rookie of the Year (1968), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1968), 3× ABA rebounding champion (1968, 1969, 1971), ABA All-Time Team, No. 34 retired by Indiana Pacers, Consensus second-team All-American (1967), 2× First-team All-WAC (1966, 1967)
  • Points: 11,778 (18.4 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 9,528 (14.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,140 (1.8 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Daniels was a standout high school basketball player and was drafted in the first round of the 1967 NBA draft by the Cincinnati Royals. Daniels played six seasons with the Royals, averaging 14.1 points, 6.7 rebounds and 2.9 assists per game over his career.

After playing his final season with the Detroit Pistons in 1976, Daniels retired from professional play and moved to Sheridan, Indiana to begin a new chapter in his life as a father and family man. Daniels passed away on October 30th at age 71 after complications from surgery he had two days prior; he will be greatly missed by all who knew him Daniels was a key player on the Indiana Pacers’ ABA championship teams of 1970 and 1972.

After playing for the Minnesota Muskies, Indianapolis based Indiana State before joining the Pacers in 1977 as an assistant coach under head coach Rick Majerus. Daniels won three consecutive ABA MVP Awards while with the Pacers from 1969-71, and was also named to seven All-Star teams over his career. He retired following the 1993 season after coaching two more seasons with Indiana before moving into front office roles with both franchises he had played for – New York and Memphis respectively.

18. David Thompson

NC State Wolfpack men's basketball

David Thompson Career

  • High school: Crest (Shelby, North Carolina)
  • College: NC State (1972–1975)
  • NBA draft 1975 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1st overall
  • Selected by the Atlanta Hawks
  • Playing career: 1975–1984
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 33, 44
  • 1975–1982: Denver Nuggets
  • 1982–1984: Seattle SuperSonics
  • 4× NBA All-Star (1977–1979, 1983), NBA All-Star Game MVP (1979), 2× All-NBA First Team (1977, 1978), ABA All-Star (1976), ABA All-Star Game MVP (1976), All-ABA Second Team (1976), ABA Rookie of the Year (1976), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1976), ABA All-Time Team, No. 33 retired by Denver Nuggets, NCAA champion (1974), NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player (1974), National college player of the year (1975), 3× Consensus first-team All-American (1973–1975), 3× ACC Player of the Year (1973–1975), 3× First-team All-ACC (1973–1975), No. 44 retired by NC State Wolfpack
  • Points: 13,422 (22.7 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,446 (4.1 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,939 (3.3 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

David Thompson was selected first overall by the Atlanta Hawks in the 1975 NBA draft. He played for the Denver Nuggets from 1975 to 1982 and then for the Seattle SuperSonics from 1982 to 1984.

Thompson is best known for his time with the Nuggets, where he helped lead them to two consecutive NBA Finals appearances (1980 and 1981). In 1984, he was traded to the Portland Trail Blazers and retired shortly afterwards.

David Thompson was a dominant player in both the ABA and NBA. He was twice named an All-NBA First Team member, and he also won two MVP awards. In 1975, he led NC State to the NCAA championship game, where they eventually lost to UCLA.

David Thompson is now retired from basketball, but his number remains retired by several teams including the Denver Nuggets.

19. Mack Calvin

Mack Calvin Career

  • High school: Long Beach Polytechnic, (Long Beach, California)
  • College: , Long Beach CC (1965–1967), USC (1967–1969)
  • NBA draft 1969 / Round: 14 / Pick: 187th overall
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1969–1981
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 20, 21, 24, 33
  • 5× ABA All-Star (1971–1975), 3x All-ABA First Team (1971, 1974, 1975), All-ABA Second Team (1973), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1970), ABA All-Time Team, First-team All-Pac-8 (1969)
  • Points: 12,172 (16.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,923 (2.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 3,617 (4.8 apg)

Mack Calvin was a highly decorated point guard in the NBA who won an championship with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1980. Calvin played collegiately at Long Beach CC and later USC before being drafted by the Lakers in 1969.

He spent 14 seasons in the NBA, winning two championships with LA and averaging 15 points per game over his career. After retiring from playing basketball, Mack worked as a color commentator for various networks until he retired from that role in 2006.

In 2009, Mack was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame alongside other legends such as Julius Erving and Larry Bird. Mack currently resides near Fort Worth, Texas where he continues to work as a commentator for college games on Fox Sports Southwest broadcasts Mack Calvin was a five-time all-star in the ABA and played for four different teams over his career.

He was an excellent rebounder and shot blocker, which helped him rack up stats across the board. His best years were with the Floridians, where he averaged 18 points and 12 rebounds per game. After playing a year for Denver, he joined the Lakers as a key player on their 1977 championship team. He retired after two seasons with San Antonio before coaching LAC from 1992 to 1995

20. Louie Dampier

Louie Dampier Career

  • High school: Southport (Indianapolis, Indiana)
  • College: Kentucky (1964–1967)
  • NBA draft 1967 / Round: 4 / Pick: 38th overall
  • Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
  • Playing career: 1967–1979
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 10
  • 1967–1976: Kentucky Colonels
  • 1976–1979: San Antonio Spurs
  • ABA champion (1975), 7× ABA All-Star (1968–1970, 1972–1975), 4× All-ABA Second Team (1968–1970, 1974), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1968), ABA All-Time Team, 2× Consensus second-team All-America (1966, 1967)
  • Points: 15,279 (15.9 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,543 (2.6 rpg)
  • Assists: 4,687 (4.9 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player

Louie Dampier was a professional basketball player who played for the Cincinnati Royals from 1967 to 1979. He averaged 14.3 points, 4.5 assists, and 3 rebounds per game during his career in the NBA.

Dampier is considered one of the best point guards of all time and is particularly known for his defensive abilities at this position. After retiring from playing basketball, he started working as a commentator on various sports broadcasts around the world until 2001 when he retired again due to health concerns Louie Dampier was one of the most dominant players in both the ABA and NBA.

He won three championships with the Spurs, and is a Hall of Famer as a player. Dampier also had an impressive career overseas, winning two EuroLeague titles with Panathinaikos Athens. After his playing days were over, Dampier became a broadcaster for San Antonio Spurs games on Fox Sports Southwest until his retirement in 2013.

21. Doug Moe

Doug Moe Career

  • High school: The Bullis School, (Potomac, Maryland)
  • College: North Carolina (1958–1961)
  • NBA draft 1961 / Round: 2 / Pick: 22nd overall
  • Selected by the Chicago Packers
  • Playing career: 1965–1972
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 34, 15
  • Coaching career: 1972–2008
  • As player:, ABA champion (1969), 3× ABA All-Star (1968–1970), All-ABA First Team (1968), All-ABA Second Team (1969), Lega Basket Serie A Top Scorer (1966), First-team All-American – USBWA (1961), Second-team All-American – AP, SN (1961), Third-team All-American – NABC, NEA (1961), 2× First-team All-ACC (1959, 1961), , As coach:, , NBA Coach of the Year (1988), Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award (2018), No. 432 honored by Denver Nuggets
  • Points: 6,161 (16.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,560 (6.8 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,197 (3.2 apg)
  • NBA: 628–529 (.543)

Doug Moe was a key player on the Chicago Packers' 1965–1972 championship team. He was drafted by the Chicago Packers in 1961 and played in the NBA for nine seasons, retiring as a member of the Philadelphia 76ers in 1972.

After retirement from playing, Moe coached various teams before becoming head coach for the Milwaukee Bucks in 2008. In total, Moe has coached over 1,000 games and won more than 500 of them. Doug Moe is currently an assistant basketball coach at Old Dominion University where he oversees their NCAA Division I men's basketball program.

Throughout his coaching career, he has been known for emphasizing defense and rebounding above all else; these skills have led him to be named Coach of The Year several times during his tenure with different teams Doug Moe was a player in the ABA and NBA, most notably with the Denver Nuggets. He was an assistant coach for several teams before becoming head coach of the Philadelphia 76ers.

His coaching record is mostly positive, though he was fired from his last job after just two seasons. Moe is currently an assistant coach with the Nuggets again.

22. Billy Cunningham

Philadelphia 76ers

Billy Cunningham Career

  • High school: Erasmus Hall, (Brooklyn, New York)
  • College: North Carolina (1962–1965)
  • NBA draft 1965 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5th overall
  • Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
  • Playing career: 1965–1976
  • Position: Small forward / Power forward
  • Number: 32
  • Coaching career: 1977–1985
  • As player:, NBA champion (1967), 4× NBA All-Star (1969–1972), 3× All-NBA First Team (1969–1971), All-NBA Second Team (1972), NBA All-Rookie First Team (1966), ABA MVP (1973), All-ABA First Team (1973), ABA All-Star (1973), NBA anniversary team (50th, 75th), ABA All-Time Team, No. 32 retired by Philadelphia 76ers, First-team All-American – USBWA (1964), Second-team All-American – NABC, UPI (1965), ACC Player of the Year (1965), 3× First-team All-ACC (1963–1965), , As coach:, , NBA champion (1983), 4× NBA All-Star Game head coach (1978, 1980, 1981, 1983)
  • Points: 16,310 (21.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 7,981 (10.4 rpg)
  • Assists: 3,305 (4.3 apg)
  • NBA: 454–196 (.698)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Cunningham was a prolific scorer in the NBA for most of his career, averaging over 20 points per game for six seasons. He is best known for leading the 76ers to back-to-back Finals appearances in 1976 and 1977, but he also had successful stints with other teams including the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Lakers.

Cunningham retired from playing in 1976 after winning an NBA championship with Philadelphia, and went on to coach several teams before retiring in 1985. Billy Cunningham was a four-time NBA All-Star and three-time First Team All-NBA player. He led the Philadelphia 76ers to an NBA championship in 1967, and also won the ABA MVP Award that same year.

After retiring as a player, he coached the Sixers for seven seasons before being fired in 1985.

23. Maurice Lucas

Portland Trail Blazers

Maurice Lucas Career

  • High school: Schenley (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Marquette (1972–1974)
  • NBA draft 1974 / Round: 1 / Pick: 14th overall
  • Selected by the Chicago Bulls
  • Playing career: 1974–1988
  • Position: Power forward
  • Number: 20, 25, 33, 23
  • 1974–1975: Spirits of St. Louis
  • 1975–1976: Kentucky Colonels
  • 1976–1980: Portland Trail Blazers
  • 1980–1981: New Jersey Nets
  • 1981–1982: New York Knicks
  • 1982–1985: Phoenix Suns
  • 1985–1986: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1986–1987: Seattle SuperSonics
  • 1987–1988: Portland Trail Blazers
  • NBA champion (1977), 4× NBA All-Star (1977–1979, 1983), ABA All-Star (1976), All-NBA Second Team (1978), NBA All-Defensive First Team (1978), NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1979), ABA All-Time Team, No. 20 retired by Portland Trail Blazers, Third-team All-American – NABC (1974), No. 20 retired by Marquette Golden Eagles, Mr. Basketball USA (1971)
  • Points: 14,857 (14.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 9,306 (9.1 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,498 (2.4 apg)

Maurice Lucas was a 7-foot power forward who played in the NBA from 1974 to 1988. He led the Bulls in scoring twice, and also won an MVP award while with Chicago.

After his playing career ended, Maurice became a coach and worked as an assistant for many teams before retiring in 2009. Maurice died on October 31, 2010 after a long battle with cancer at age 58 Maurice Lucas was a key player on the Portland Trail Blazers during the late 1970s and early 1980s.

He was an all-star, defensive specialist and Mr. Basketball USA winner in 1971. After playing for six different teams over 12 seasons, he retired in 1988 with a career scoring average of 17 points per game

24. Donnie Freeman

Donnie Freeman Career

  • High school: Madison (Madison, Illinois)
  • College: Illinois (1963–1966)
  • NBA draft 1966 / Round: 3 / Pick: 29th overall
  • Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
  • Playing career: 1967–1976
  • Position: Shooting guard / Point guard
  • Number: 20, 13
  • 1967–1970: Minnesota Muskies / Miami Floridians
  • 1971: Utah Stars
  • 1971–1972: Texas / Dallas Chaparrals
  • 1972–1974: Indiana Pacers
  • 1974–1975: San Antonio Spurs
  • 1975–1976: Los Angeles Lakers
  • ABA champion (1973), ABA All-Time Team, 5× ABA All-Star (1968–1972), All-ABA First Team (1972), 3× All-ABA Second Team (1969–1971)
  • Points: 12,233 (18.9 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,292 (3.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,292 (3.5 apg)

Freeman was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers in the 1966 NBA draft. He played for the Minnesota Muskies and Miami Floridians during his career. Freeman is best known for his time with the Utah Stars, where he won an NBA championship in 1971.

After retiring from playing basketball, Freeman moved into broadcasting and worked as a commentator for various leagues including the WNBA and EuroLeague tournaments. In 2016, Freeman became head coach of Madison Musketeers men's basketball team in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin but resigned after one season due to health concerns related to dementia diagnosis Freeman was a key part of the 1971-1972 Texas Chaparrals, who won the ABA Championship.

Freeman played for the Indiana Pacers from 1972 to 1974 and then teamed up with San Antonio Spurs in 1975. He left basketball after one season to focus on his business interests but came back in 1976 when he signed with the Los Angeles Lakers. The versatile forward finished his playing career with 3 more All-ABA Second Team selections, 2 ASM First Teams and 1 MVP award in 1973 as champion of the ABA Playoffs against Kentucky Colonels (the eventual NBA Champions).

After retiring from basketball, Freeman became an executive vice president at PepsiCo where he still works today; he is also involved in numerous philanthropic endeavors including work with Boys & Girls Clubs of America and Diabetes Research Institute Foundation among others.

25. James Silas

San Antonio Spurs

James Silas Career

  • High school: McCall (Tallulah, Louisiana)
  • College: Stephen F. Austin (1968–1972)
  • NBA draft 1972 / Round: 5 / Pick: 70th overall
  • Selected by the Houston Rockets
  • Playing career: 1972–1982
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 13
  • 1972–1981: Dallas Chaparrals / San Antonio Spurs
  • 1981–1982: Cleveland Cavaliers
  • 2× ABA All-Star (1975, 1976), All-ABA First Team (1976), All-ABA Second Team (1975), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1973), ABA All-Time Team, No. 13 retired by San Antonio Spurs
  • Points: 11,038 (16.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,068 (3.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 2,628 (3.8 apg)

James Silas was born on February 11, 1949 in Tallulah, Louisiana. He attended McCall High School and played college basketball for Stephen F. Austin. In the 1972 NBA draft, Silas was selected by the Houston Rockets with the 70th overall pick.

He spent three seasons with the Dallas Chaparrals and San Antonio Spurs before retiring in 1982 at age 28 due to a knee injury.. James Silas was a two-time ABA All-Star and an all-around player for the Cleveland Cavaliers. He helped lead the Cavs to three consecutive championships in the early 1980s, as well as being inducted into both the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

After his playing days were over, he served as general manager of several teams before retiring in 2006.

26. Bob Netolicky

Bob Netolicky Career

  • High school: Washington (Cedar Rapids, Iowa)
  • College: Drake (1964–1967)
  • NBA draft 1967 / Round: 2 / Pick: 18th overall
  • Selected by the San Diego Rockets
  • Playing career: 1967–1976
  • Position: Power forward / Center
  • Number: 24
  • 1967–1972: Indiana Pacers
  • 1972–1973: Dallas Chaparrals / San Antonio Spurs
  • 1973–1976: Indiana Pacers
  • 2× ABA champion (1970, 1972), All-ABA Second Team (1970), 4× ABA All-Star (1968–1971), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1968), ABA All-Time Team, First-team All-MVC (1967)
  • Points: 9,876 (16.0 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 5,518 (8.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 848 (1.4 apg)

Bob Netolicky was born in San Francisco, California on August 2, 1942. He attended high school at Washington (Cedar Rapids, Iowa) and played college basketball for Drake.

In 1967, the San Diego Rockets drafted Bob with the 18th overall pick in the NBA draft. During his playing career, he mainly spent time at power forward and center and is best known for his time with the Houston Rockets from 1976 to 1980 where he won two championships (1977 & 1978).

After retiring from professional basketball, Bob continued to play amateur ball until 1985 before eventually hanging up his sneakers completely in 1990 after a stint as head coach of an American Legion team in Missouri City, Texas.. Netolicky was one of the most popular players in Pacers history.

Netolicky helped lead Indiana to two ABA championships and was an all-star four times. After playing 12 seasons in the NBA, Netolicky retired from basketball in 1976 at the age of 35. Netolicky is a member of both the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and Indiana Sports Hall of Fame, as well as having his jersey number (#15) retired by the Pacers organization.

In addition to his success on court, Netolicky also served as president and ownerof several businesses after retiring from basketball including a fireworks company and a trucking business which he ran with his brother-in-law for over 20 years. Today, Bob resides in Indianapolis with his wife Patrice where they continue to be avid supporters of their local community organizations such as Riley Hospital for Children (where they raised money for many years through their annual golf tournament).

27. Billy Paultz

Billy Paultz Career

  • High school: River Dell (Oradell, New Jersey)
  • College: , Cameron (1966–1967), St. John's (1968–1970)
  • NBA draft 1970 / Round: 7 / Pick: 103rd overall
  • Selected by the San Diego Rockets
  • Playing career: 1970–1985
  • Position: Center / Power forward
  • Number: 5
  • 1970–1975: New York Nets
  • 1975–1980: San Antonio Spurs
  • 1980–1983: Houston Rockets
  • 1983: San Antonio Spurs
  • 1983–1984: Atlanta Hawks
  • 1984–1985: Utah Jazz
  • ABA champion (1974), 3× ABA All-Star (1973, 1975, 1976), ABA blocks leader (1976), ABA All-Time Team
  • Points: 13,099 (11.7 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 8,959 (8.0 rpg)
  • Blocks: 1,457 (1.5 bpg)

Billy Paultz was a center and power forward who played in the NBA for over 20 years. He was drafted by the San Diego Rockets in 1970, and spent most of his career with them.

In 1985, he retired from professional basketball to focus on his family life. Billy has three children - two sons and a daughter - and lives in River Edge, New Jersey with them now.

He is still involved in basketball coaching, working as an assistant coach at several schools around the country Billy Paultz played for the New York Nets and San Antonio Spurs during his NBA career.

He was a 3-time ABA All-Star, and led the league in blocks twice. Billy is most remembered for his time with the Houston Rockets, where he won an NBA championship in 1984. After playing out his last few years in Europe, he retired from professional basketball in 1995 at age 39.

28. Willie Wise

Willie Wise Career

  • High school: Balboa (San Francisco, California)
  • College: , CC of San Francisco (1965–1967), Drake (1967–1969)
  • NBA draft 1969 / Round: 5 / Pick: 64th overall
  • Selected by the San Francisco Warriors
  • Playing career: 1969–1977
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 42
  • 1969–1974: Los Angeles / Utah Stars
  • 1974–1976: Virginia Squires
  • 1976–1977: Denver Nuggets
  • 1977: Seattle SuperSonics
  • ABA champion (1971), 3× ABA All-Star (1972–1974), 2× All-ABA Second Team (1972, 1974), 2× ABA All-Defensive First Team (1973, 1974), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1970), ABA All-Time Team, No. 42 retired by Drake Bulldogs
  • Points: 9,727 (17.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 4,578 (8.3 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,594 (2.9 apg)

Willie Wise was a versatile small forward who played for the San Francisco Warriors from 1969 to 1977. He was drafted by the Warriors in 1969 and spent five seasons with the team before being traded to the Philadelphia 76ers in 1973.

After spending one season with Philadelphia, he moved onto the New York Nets where he remained for six seasons until his retirement in 1977. Willie Wise is perhaps best known for his time with the 76ers,where he averaged 13 points per game over parts of four seasons (1970–1973).

He also had success playing alongside Julius Erving on both teams and is widely regarded as one of pro basketball's all-time greats at small forward position Wise was a versatile player in both the ABA and NBA. He won an ABA championship with the Los Angeles Stars in 1971, and helped the Nuggets to two more championships in 1977 and 1978.

In addition, Wise was an All-Star twice (1972–1974) and led the league in assists twice (1973, 1974). After his playing days were over he served as head coach of the Denver Nuggets for three seasons from 1991 to 1993 before retiring from coaching altogether.

29. Darel Carrier

Darel Carrier Career

  • High school: Bristow (Bristow, Kentucky)
  • College: Western Kentucky (1961–1964)
  • NBA draft 1964 / Round: 9 / Pick: 74th overall
  • Selected by the St. Louis Hawks
  • Playing career: 1967–1973
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 34
  • 1967–1972: Kentucky Colonels
  • 1972–1973: Memphis Tams
  • 3× ABA All-Star (1968–1970), ABA All-Time Team, 3× First-team All-OVC (1962–1964), No. 35 jersey retired by Western Kentucky Hilltoppers
  • Medals, , Representing  United States, Men's basketball, Pan American Games, : 1967 Winnipeg: Team Competition
  • Representing  United States
  • Men's basketball
  • Pan American Games
  • : 1967 Winnipeg: Team Competition

Darel Carrier was born in 1940 in Warren County, Kentucky. Carrier attended high school in Bristow (Bristow, Kentucky). He played college basketball at Western Kentucky from 1961 to 1964 where he became the team captain his senior year.

After playing two seasons with the Kentucky Colonels of the NBA, Carrier was drafted by the St. Louis Hawks in the 1964 draft and began his professional career with them that same year. He remained a member of the Hawks until 1973 when he was traded to the Philadelphia 76ers along with Herm Gilliam for Billy Cunningham and Don Kojis .

During this time he averaged 10 points per game over his seven-year career averaging 6 ft 3 inches tall and 185 pounds weight class on average shooting 33 percent from three point range and 81 percent from free throw line for 1,868 total points scored during 527 games played averaging 7 minutes per contest (13 starts). In 1978 Carrier signed as a free agent with Seattle SuperSonics but did not play any games due to injury before retiring after playing one season for Fort Wayne Pistons later that same year ending his 12-year pro career having started it out back at Western Kentucky where he had led them to their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 1954 winning NIT title while being named MVP both times.

30. Ron Boone

Ron Boone Career

  • High school: Omaha Technical, (Omaha, Nebraska)
  • College: , Clarinda CC (1964–1965), Idaho State (1965–1968)
  • NBA draft 1968 / Round: 11 / Pick: 147th overall
  • Selected by the Phoenix Suns
  • Playing career: 1968–1981
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 12, 24, 1
  • 1968–1971: Dallas / Texas Chaparrals
  • 1971–1975: Utah Stars
  • 1975–1976: Spirits of St. Louis
  • 1976–1978: Kansas City Kings
  • 1978–1979: Los Angeles Lakers
  • 1979–1981: Utah Jazz
  • ABA champion (1971), 4× ABA All-Star (1971, 1974–1976), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1969), All-ABA First Team (1974), All-ABA Second Team (1975), ABA All-Time Team, 2× First-team All-Big Sky (1967, 1968)
  • Points: 17,437 (16.8 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 4,348 (4.2 rpg)
  • Steals: 823 (1.3 spg)

Boone was a shooting guard who played in the NBA for 16 seasons. Boone is best known for his time with the Phoenix Suns, where he helped lead them to two consecutive championships in 1980 and 1981.

Boone also had successful stints with the Cleveland Cavaliers and Dallas Mavericks, among others. In all, Boone averaged 17 points per game over his career and holds numerous records including most three-pointers made (1,034) and attempted (6,868).

Boone retired from playing in 1981 after suffering a knee injury that ended his career prematurely. He later served as an assistant coach for several teams before retiring once again in 2003. Boone was one of the most dominant forwards in both the ABA and NBA.

He won four titles with the Dallas Chaparrals, three with Utah Stars, and one with Spirits of St. Louis before retiring in 1978. Boone is a member of both the ABA All-Time team and the NBA's 50th Anniversary all-star team.

31. Ted McClain

Ted McClain Career

  • High school: Pearl (Nashville, Tennessee)
  • College: Tennessee State (1967–1971)
  • NBA draft 1971 / Round: 2 / Pick: 22nd overall
  • Selected by the Atlanta Hawks
  • Playing career: 1971–1979
  • Position: Point guard / Shooting guard
  • Number: 24, 12
  • 1971–1974: Carolina Cougars
  • 1974–1976: Kentucky Colonels
  • 1976: New York Nets
  • 1976–1977: Denver Nuggets
  • 1977–1978: Buffalo Braves
  • 1978: Philadelphia 76ers
  • 1979: Phoenix Suns
  • 2× ABA champion (1975–1976), ABA All-Star (1974), ABA All-Defensive First Team (1974)
  • Points: 4,669 (8.4 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,627 (2.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,909 (3.4 apg)

McClain played professional basketball for over 20 years, including a 12-year stint with the Atlanta Hawks. McClain was one of the best point guards in NBA history, averaging 24 points and 12 assists per season.

McClain is perhaps most famous for his performance in the 1976 playoffs against the Seattle SuperSonics, when he led Charlotte to an improbable victory. After retiring from playing basketball, McClain became a successful coach and television commentator.

McClain was a key player for the New York Nets in their ABA championship run in 1975-1976. McClain played briefly with the Denver Nuggets and then spent most of his career with the Buffalo Braves, where he won an ABA title in 1978. After spending two seasons with Philadelphia 76ers, McClain joined Phoenix Suns before retiring from playing professional basketball at age 34 in 1979.

Ted McClain is best known for being one of only four players to record over 3,000 assists during his NBA career (alongside John Stockton, Karl Malone and Jason Kidd). He was also named to three All-Star teams - including one as captain - and holds several other records related to assist totals and rebounds per game averages among others

32. Brian Taylor

Brian Taylor Career

  • High school: Perth Amboy, (Perth Amboy, New Jersey)
  • College: Princeton (1970–1972)
  • NBA draft 1972 / Round: 2 / Pick: 23rd overall
  • Selected by the Seattle SuperSonics
  • Playing career: 1972–1982
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 14
  • 1972–1976: New York Nets
  • 1976–1977: Kansas City Kings
  • 1977–1978: Denver Nuggets
  • 1978–1982: San Diego Clippers
  • 2× ABA champion (1974, 1976), 2× ABA All-Star (1975, 1976), All-ABA Second Team (1975), 2× ABA All-Defensive First Team (1975, 1976), NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1977), ABA Rookie of the Year (1973), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1973), ABA steals leader (1975), Second-team All-American – NABC (1972), Third-team All-American – AP, UPI (1972)
  • Points: 7,868 (13.1 ppg)
  • Assists: 2,478 (4.1 apg)
  • Steals: 1,106 (2.1 spg)

Brian Taylor was born in 1951 in Perth Amboy, New Jersey. He attended high school at Perth Amboy and played college basketball at Princeton. After being drafted by the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1972 NBA draft, he spent seven seasons with them before joining the Milwaukee Bucks for one season.

In 1982, he signed with the San Antonio Spurs where he remained until his retirement in 1990. Brian Taylor is a two-time All-Star point guard who helped lead Seattle to their only championship appearance during his time there and also won an Olympic gold medal with Team USA in 1976 playing alongside Earvin Magic Johnson and James Worthy Taylor was a two-time ABA champion and All-Star with the San Diego Clippers.

He then had an illustrious NBA career, playing for Denver Nuggets, San Diego Clippers and Utah Jazz before retiring in 1988. Taylor is remembered as one of the best defenders of his era and was named to both the All-Aba Second Team and All-Defensive First Team.

33. Don Buse

Indiana Pacers

Don Buse Career

  • High school: Holland (Holland, Indiana)
  • College: Evansville (1969–1972)
  • NBA draft 1972 / Round: 3 / Pick: 34th overall
  • Selected by the Phoenix Suns
  • Playing career: 1972–1985
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 10, 11
  • 1972–1977: Indiana Pacers
  • 1977–1980: Phoenix Suns
  • 1980–1982: Indiana Pacers
  • 1982–1983: Portland Trail Blazers
  • 1983–1985: Kansas City Kings
  • ABA champion (1973), NBA All-Star (1977), ABA All-Star (1976), All-ABA Second Team (1976), 4× NBA All-Defensive First Team (1977–1980), 2× ABA All-Defensive First Team (1975, 1976), NBA assists leader (1977), NBA steals leader (1977), NCAA Division II champion (1971), No. 10 jersey retired by Evansville Purple Aces
  • Points: 6,890 (7.1 ppg)
  • Assists: 4,425 (4.6 apg)
  • Steals: 1,818 (2.0 spg)

Buse was a standout high school player and successfully transferred to Evansville University. After two seasons with the Indiana Pacers, he was traded to Phoenix in 1977.

He played for the Suns until 1985. Buse is most famous for his time with the Phoenix Suns, where he led the team to two playoff appearances and one championship in 1979. After retiring from playing basketball, Buse became a television commentator and sports analyst on various networks around the United States.

Buse was a key player on the Indiana Pacers teams that won two ABA championships in the 1970s. After playing for three years with the Portland Trail Blazers, he joined the Kansas City Kings in 1985 and helped them make it to the NBA Finals twice (1985 and 1988). He then had a long career as a backup point guard with several other teams before retiring in 1999.

Buse is remembered most fondly by his Evansville Purple Aces teammates who retired his No 10 jersey in 2001. Don Buse was inducted into both the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame (2000) and Indiana Sports Hall of Fame (2004). In 2006, he became an assistant coach for his alma mater, Evansville University

34. John Brisker

John Brisker Career

  • High school: Hamtramck (Hamtramck, Michigan)
  • College: Toledo (1966–1968)
  • Playing career: 1969–1975
  • Position: Forward / Guard
  • Number: 23, 45, 40, 42
  • 1969–1972: Pittsburgh Pipers/Condors
  • 1972–1975: Seattle SuperSonics
  • 1975: Cherry Hill Rookies
  • 2× ABA All-Star (1971, 1972), All-ABA Second Team (1971), ABA All-Rookie First Team (1970)
  • Points: 6,847 (20.7 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 2,152 (6.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 787 (2.4 apg)

Brisker attended Hamtramck High School in Detroit, Michigan and played for the Rockets varsity basketball team from 1965 to 1968. He then transferred to Toledo where he became a two-time All-American forward and helped lead the Rockets to an NCAA tournament appearance in 1974.

Brisker was drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers with the 23rd overall pick of the 1969 NBA draft but never played for them as he signed with their archrivals, the Boston Celtics instead. He spent four seasons with Boston before joining the Houston Rockets in 1975 where he ended his playing career after winning another championship that year.

After retiring from basketball, Brisker started a successful business which involved importing cars into America from Japan and later expanded into other ventures such as real estate development and trucking companieships operations around Texas and Louisiana in addition to opening several restaurants throughout Ohio including one located inside The Q Casino & Resort in Cleveland Heights, Ohio which still operates today under new ownership .

John Brisker died on May 29, 1985 at age 37 after suffering a heart attack while working out at his home gymnasium following a loss by his old team (Houston) against San Antonio Spurs during Game 7 of their first round playoff series .

35. LeBron James

Los Angeles Lakers

LeBron James Career

  • 4× NBA champion (2012, 2013, 2016, 2020)
  • 4× NBA Finals MVP (2012, 2013, 2016, 2020)
  • 4× NBA Most Valuable Player (2009, 2010, 2012, 2013)
  • 18× NBA All-Star (2005–2022)
  • 3× NBA All-Star Game MVP (2006, 2008, 2018)
  • 13× All-NBA First Team (2006, 2008–2018, 2020)
  • 3× All-NBA Second Team (2005, 2007, 2021)
  • 2× All-NBA Third Team (2019, 2022)
  • 5× NBA All-Defensive First Team (2009–2013)
  • NBA All-Defensive Second Team (2014)
  • NBA Rookie of the Year (2004)
  • NBA All-Rookie First Team (2004)
  • NBA scoring champion (2008)
  • NBA assists leader (2020)
  • NBA 75th Anniversary Team
  • 4× AP Athlete of the Year (2013, 2016, 2018, 2020)
  • 3× Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year (2012, 2016, 2020)
  • Time Athlete of the Year (2020)
  • USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year (2012)
  • 2× National high school player of the year (2002, 2003)
  • McDonald's All-American Game MVP (2003)
  • 2× First-team Parade All-American (2002, 2003)
  • 3× Ohio Mr. Basketball (2001–2003)

LeBron James is a two-time NBA champion and three-time MVP. He has led the Cavaliers to back-to-back championships in 2016 and 2017. In 2018, he joined the Lakers for an unprecedented move westward in the NBA's history.

His jersey number (6) was retired by both Cleveland Cavaliers and Miami Heat organizations after his third consecutive MVP award in 2014–2015 season. LeBron James also holds several other records such as most points scored in a playoff game with 73 against Boston Celtics, highest scoring average ever with 38 point per game over whole career, youngest player to score 30 000 points or more and fastest player to reach 20 000 assists milestone among others LeBron James is a four-time NBA Champion, three-time MVP and eighteen-time All Star.

He has been named to the NBA’s all-defensive teams five times and was an AP Athlete of the Year nominee in 2013, 2016 and 2018. LeBron also won gold medals with Team USA at the 2002 FIBA World Championship, 2012 Olympics and 2016 Rio Olympics respectively. In 2020 he became only the fourth player in history to win scoring titles in each of his first six seasons as a professional (28 points per game).

36. Dick Tinkham

Career

Dick Tinkham is an American businessman and philanthropist who has been involved in a number of successful businesses. He was born on June 24, 1932, in Boston, Massachusetts.

Dick Tinkham started his own company at the age of 22 and went on to become one of the wealthiest businessmen in America. In 1978, he founded The Tufts Center for the Study of Drugs and Health Policy and served as its president until his retirement in 2004.

Dick Tinkham is also a philanthropist who has donated millions of dollars to various causes over the years including cancer research, AIDS awareness initiatives and educational programs for disadvantaged youth. Dick Tinkham passed away on October 14th 2018 at the age of 86 after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease Dick Tinkham was a sports executive who helped create the American Basketball Association and the Indiana Pacers.

Dick Tinkham played an important role in developing professional basketball, and his work has had a lasting impact on the sport. Dick Tinkham is a highly respected figure within the basketball community, and he has made significant contributions to both his profession and society as a whole. Dick Tinkham is widely credited with helping to grow basketball into what it is today, and he remains an influential figure in the game today.

The American Basketball Association (ABA) was founded by Dick Tinkham, and this league played an important role in shaping professional basketball history - particularly during its early years. The ABA was eventually merged with another league - the National Basketball Association (NBA) - which led to improved standards for all aspects of professional basketball across North America.. Dick Tinkham's contribution to pro basketball goes far beyond establishing one of the most successful leagues in history; he also fostered high-quality player development programs that have had a lasting impact on many current NBA stars..

Dick Tinkeram passed away at age 89 on October 1st 2018 after a long battle with cancer; his legacy will continue to be felt throughout professional basketball for years to come

37. Wilt Chamberlain

Golden State Warriors

Wilt Chamberlain Career

  • High school: Overbrook (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Kansas (1956–1958)
  • NBA draft 1959 / Pick: Territorial
  • Selected by the Philadelphia Warriors
  • Playing career: 1958–1973
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 13
  • Coaching career: 1973–1974
  • 2× NBA champion (1967, 1972), NBA Finals MVP (1972), 4× NBA Most Valuable Player (1960, 1966–1968), 13× NBA All-Star (1960–1969, 1971–1973), NBA All-Star Game MVP (1960), 7× All-NBA First Team (1960–1962, 1964, 1966–1968), 3× All-NBA Second Team (1963, 1965, 1972), 2× NBA All-Defensive First Team (1972, 1973), NBA Rookie of the Year (1960), 7× NBA scoring champion (1960–1966), 11× NBA rebounding champion (1960–1963, 1966–1969, 1971–1973), NBA assist leader (1968), Most Points in One Game (100), Most Rebounds in One Game (55), NBA anniversary team (35th, 50th, 75th), No. 13 retired by Harlem Globetrotters, No. 13 retired by Golden State Warriors, No. 13 retired by Philadelphia 76ers, No. 13 retired by Los Angeles Lakers, NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player (1957), 2× Consensus first-team All-American (1957, 1958), First-team All-Big 7 (1957), No. 13 jersey retired by Kansas Jayhawks, Mr. Basketball USA (1955)
  • Points: 31,419 (30.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 23,924 (22.9 rpg)
  • Assists: 4,643 (4.4 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Wilt Chamberlain is widely considered one of the greatest basketball players in history, and he is also known for his dominant play in the center position.

He was drafted by the Philadelphia Warriors in 1959 and went on to become one of their all-time greats, winning multiple MVP awards and scoring more than 30,000 points during his career.

After retiring from playing professional basketball, Chamberlain embarked on a successful coaching career which saw him lead teams to playoff appearances and win championships. Wilt Chamberlain died at the age of 63 after a lengthy battle with cancer.

Wilt Chamberlain is widely considered to be one of the greatest players in NBA history. He won multiple championships and MVP awards during his career, and was also an all-star for 13 consecutive seasons. Chamberlain's size and strength were legendary, as he routinely dominated opponents on both the court and in dunk contests.

Chamberlain's impact on basketball cannot be overstated - he helped pave the way for future stars such as Michael Jordan and LeBron James.

38. Derrick Dial

Oklahoma City Blue

Derrick Dial Career

  • High school: Cass Technical (Detroit, Michigan)
  • College: Eastern Michigan (1994–1998)
  • NBA draft 1998 / Round: 2 / Pick: 52nd overall
  • Selected by the San Antonio Spurs
  • Playing career: 1998–2009
  • Position: Shooting guard
  • Number: 5, 10, 44, 13
  • 1998: Camden Power
  • 1998–1999: Peristeri B.C.
  • 1999–2001: San Antonio Spurs
  • 2001–2002: New Jersey Nets
  • 2002: South California Surf
  • 2002: Toronto Raptors
  • 2002–2003: Virtus Pallacanestro Bologna
  • 2003–2004: Long Beach Jam
  • 2003–2004: Orlando Magic
  • 2004–2005: Long Beach Jam
  • 2005: Valencia BC
  • 2006–2007: Olympiada Patras BC
  • 2008: Anaheim Arsenal
  • 2008–2009: Tulsa 66ers
  • Greek All-Star Game (1998)

Derrick Dial was born in Detroit, Michigan on December 20th, 1975. He played high school basketball at Cass Technical in Detroit and then attended Eastern Michigan University from 1994 to 1998 where he played for the EMU Eagles.

In 1998 Derrick was drafted by the San Antonio Spurs with the 52nd overall pick and spent nine seasons playing for them before moving to the Charlotte Bobcats in 2011. Derrick has had a successful career both domestically and internationally as he has represented USA Basketball on several occasions, including winning a gold medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics held in Athens, Greece along with teammates Kevin Garnett and Kobe Bryant.

In 2010 Derrick signed with Maccabi Tel Aviv of Israel’s Liga Leumit but left after one season to join CHAO Zhenye of China’s CBA League where he currently plays as their shooting guard/small forward starting lineup player alongside current NBA players Luol Deng (Chicago Bulls) and Diaw Adebayo (Miami Heat). Derrick is married to his wife Courtney who also attended EMU alongside him; they have two children together – daughter Meriiah (born 2006) and son Elijah (born 2009).

39. Kyrie Irving

Brooklyn Nets

Kyrie Irving Career

  • High school: , Montclair Kimberley Academy, (Montclair, New Jersey), St. Patrick, (Elizabeth, New Jersey)
  • College: Duke (2010–2011)
  • NBA draft 2011 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1st overall
  • Selected by the Cleveland Cavaliers
  • Playing career: 2011–present
  • 2011–2017: Cleveland Cavaliers
  • 2017–2019: Boston Celtics
  • 2019–present: Brooklyn Nets
  • NBA champion (2016), 7× NBA All-Star (2013–2015, 2017–2019, 2021), NBA All-Star Game MVP (2014), All-NBA Second Team (2019), 2× All-NBA Third Team (2015, 2021), 50–40–90 club (2021), NBA Rookie of the Year (2012), NBA All-Rookie First Team (2012), NBA Three-Point Contest champion (2013), USA Basketball Male Athlete of the Year (2014), FIBA World Cup MVP (2014), McDonald's All-American (2010), First-team Parade All-American (2010)
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, Olympics, : 2016 Rio de Janeiro: Team, World Cup, : 2014 Spain: Team, FIBA Americas U18 Championship, : 2010 San Antonio: Team
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • Olympics
  • : 2016 Rio de Janeiro: Team
  • World Cup
  • : 2014 Spain: Team
  • FIBA Americas U18 Championship
  • : 2010 San Antonio: Team

Kyrie Irving was born in Melbourne, Australia on March 23, 1992. After playing college basketball at Duke, he was drafted by the Cleveland Cavaliers in 2013 and went on to win an NBA title with them in 2016.

In 2018, Irving joined the Boston Celtics and helped them reach the playoffs for the first time in over a decade. He is married to Ayesha Curry and has two children: daughter Kiari Lee (born October 12, 2017), and son Tristan Kyrie (born February 8, 2020).

Kyrie Irving is known for his strong shooting ability from long range as well as his Passing & Ball Handling skills off the dribble which have made him one of the most feared players in today's NBA game Kyrie Irving was selected 1st overall in the 2011 NBA draft by the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Kyrie has played for four other teams since then, most notably with the Cavaliers and Boston Celtics where he won an NBA championship in 2016. Kyrie is a two-time All-Star and MVP award winner, and also earned Second Team All-NBA honors twice during his time with Cleveland as well as being named to the 50/40/90 club (2021).

Kyrie led Boston to playoffs this season before being traded to Brooklyn Nets earlier this month.

40. Larry Bird

Boston Celtics

Larry Bird Career

  • High school: Springs Valley, (French Lick, Indiana)
  • College: Indiana State (1976–1979)
  • NBA draft 1978 / Round: 1 / Pick: 6th overall
  • Selected by the Boston Celtics
  • Playing career: 1979–1992
  • Position: Small forward / Power forward
  • Number: 33
  • Coaching career: 1997–2000
  • As player:, 3× NBA champion (1981, 1984, 1986), 2× NBA Finals MVP (1984, 1986), 3× NBA Most Valuable Player (1984–1986), 12× NBA All-Star (1980–1988, 1990–1992), NBA All-Star Game MVP (1982), 9× All-NBA First Team (1980–1988), All-NBA Second Team (1990), 3× NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1982–1984), NBA Rookie of the Year (1980), NBA All-Rookie Team (1980), 3× NBA Three-Point Contest champion (1986–1988), 2× 50–40–90 club (1987, 1988), AP Athlete of the Year (1986), NBA Lifetime Achievement Award (2019), NBA anniversary team (50th, 75th), No. 33 retired by Boston Celtics, National college player of the year (1979), 2× Consensus first-team All-American (1978, 1979), Third-team All-American – NABC, UPI (1977), 2× MVC Player of the Year (1978, 1979), No. 33 retired by Indiana State Sycamores, No. 33 retired by Springs Valley High Blackhawks, , As coach:, , NBA Coach of the Year (1998), NBA All-Star Game head coach (1998), , As executive:, , NBA Executive of the Year (2012)
  • Points: 21,791 (24.3 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 8,974 (10.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 5,695 (6.3 apg)
  • NBA: 147–67 (.687)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, World University Games, : 1977 Sofia: Men's Basketball, FIBA Americas Championship, : 1992 Portland: Men's basketball, Olympic Games, : 1992 Barcelona: Men's Basketball
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • World University Games
  • : 1977 Sofia: Men's Basketball
  • FIBA Americas Championship
  • : 1992 Portland: Men's basketball
  • Olympic Games
  • : 1992 Barcelona: Men's Basketball

Larry Bird is one of the most decorated players in NBA history. He was a six-time All Star, three-time MVP, and two-time champion. Bird led the Celtics to eight championships during his playing career and is still considered one of the greatest players in league history.

After retiring from playing basketball, Bird went on to coach with Boston for two seasons before moving onto Indiana Pacers where he coached until 1997. In 2000, Bird became head coach at UCLA where he stayed for four years before returning to coaching with Boston again in 2006–07 season Larry Bird was one of the most beloved and successful players in NBA history.

He led the Boston Celtics to three championship titles, won multiple MVP awards, and was a 10-time All-Star. Bird's skills as an all-around player were unrivaled, as he could shoot threes well, play defense well, handle the ball well and score inside or outside. His style of play earned him nicknames such as "The Legend" and "The Hick from French Lick." After retiring from playing in 1992, Bird served two stints as head coach with Indiana Pacers before being named president of basketball operations for the Philadelphia 76ers in 2018.

41. Bill Russell

Boston Celtics

Bill Russell Career

  • High school: McClymonds (Oakland, California)
  • College: San Francisco (1953–1956)
  • NBA draft 1956 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2nd overall
  • Selected by the St. Louis Hawks
  • Playing career: 1956–1969
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 6
  • Coaching career: 1966–1988
  • As player:, 11× NBA champion (1957, 1959–1966, 1968, 1969), 5× NBA Most Valuable Player (1958, 1961–1963, 1965), 12× NBA All-Star (1958–1969), NBA All-Star Game MVP (1963), 3× All-NBA First Team (1959, 1963, 1965), 8× All-NBA Second Team (1958, 1960–1962, 1964, 1966–1968), NBA All-Defensive First Team (1969), 4× NBA rebounding champion (1958, 1959, 1964, 1965), NBA Lifetime Achievement Award (2017), NBA anniversary team (25th, 35th, 50th, 75th), No. 6 retired by Boston Celtics, No. 6 retired by all NBA teams, 2× NCAA champion (1955, 1956), NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Player (1955), UPI College Player of the Year (1956), 2× Helms Player of the Year (1955, 1956), 2× Consensus first-team All-American (1955, 1956), WCC Player of the Year (1956), 3× First-team All-WCC (1954–1956), No. 6 retired by San Francisco Dons, Presidential Medal of Freedom (2011), , As coach:, , 2× NBA champion (1968, 1969)
  • Points: 14,522 (15.1 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 21,620 (22.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 4,100 (4.3 apg)
  • NBA: 341–290 (.540)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as coach
  • FIBA Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, Olympic Games, : 1956 Melbourne: Team competition
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • Olympic Games
  • : 1956 Melbourne: Team competition

Bill Russell was one of the greatest players in NBA history, winning 12 championships with the Boston Celtics. He was also a successful coach, leading the Boston Celtics to more titles than any other team he coached.

In 1966, he became head coach of the Philadelphia 76ers and led them to two consecutive Finals appearances before retiring in 1988. Bill Russell has been inducted into both the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and the National Football League Hall of Fame.

Bill Russell is considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. He won 11 championships with the Boston Celtics and was also a five-time MVP and 12-time All-Star. Bill Russell became an icon for civil rights when he led the Boston Celtics to victory in their historic 1966–67 season, which included a victory over segregationist Philadelphia 76ers.

After retiring as a player, Bill Russell served as head coach of both the Celtics and Seattle SuperSonics before eventually returning to coaching his alma mater, UCLA Bruins, where he remains currently coaching team today.

42. Stephen Curry

Golden State Warriors

Stephen Curry Career

  • High school: Charlotte Christian, (Charlotte, North Carolina)
  • College: Davidson (2006–2009)
  • NBA draft 2009 / Round: 1 / Pick: 7th overall
  • Selected by the Golden State Warriors
  • Playing career: 2009–present
  • 2009–present: Golden State Warriors
  • 4× NBA champion (2015, 2017, 2018, 2022), NBA Finals MVP (2022), 2× NBA Most Valuable Player (2015, 2016), 8× NBA All-Star (2014–2019, 2021, 2022), NBA All-Star Game MVP (2022), 4× All-NBA First Team (2015, 2016, 2019, 2021), 3× All-NBA Second Team (2014, 2017, 2022), All-NBA Third Team (2018), NBA Western Conference Finals MVP (2022), 2× NBA Three-Point Contest champion (2015, 2021), 2× NBA scoring champion (2016, 2021), NBA steals leader (2016), 50–40–90 club (2016), NBA All-Rookie First Team (2010), NBA 75th Anniversary Team, Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year (2022), Consensus first-team All-American (2009), Consensus second-team All-American (2008), NCAA season scoring leader (2009), 2× SoCon Player of the Year (2008, 2009), 3× First-team All-SoCon (2007–2009), No. 30 retired by Davidson Wildcats
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, FIBA World Cup, : 2010 Turkey: National team, : 2014 Spain: National team
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • FIBA World Cup
  • : 2010 Turkey: National team
  • : 2014 Spain: National team

Stephen Curry is a professional basketball player who plays for the Golden State Warriors. He was born in 1988 and played college ball at Davidson before being drafted by the Warriors in 2009.

Curry has been one of the best point guards in NBA history and is currently third all-time in scoring behind James Harden and Michael Jordan among active players. In addition to his incredible on court play, Curry is known for his philanthropy and activism off of it, especially with regards to children's health issues.

Stephen Curry will be playing into his late 30s which means there is still plenty of time left for him to cement himself as one of the greatest ever. Stephen Curry is a two-time NBA MVP and four-time champion. He was also named Most Valuable Player of the 2018 NBA Finals, which saw his Golden State Warriors win their fourth title in five years.

In 2011, Curry became just the sixth player in history to average at least 25 points per game for an entire season, doing so while shooting 47 percent from three-point range. His versatile play has seen him rack up accolades across all categories – he's won several awards including All-NBA First Team honours and been crowned scoring king and steals leader multiple times over.

43. Oscar Robertson

Sacramento Kings

Oscar Robertson Career

  • High school: Crispus Attucks, (Indianapolis, Indiana)
  • College: Cincinnati (1957–1960)
  • NBA draft 1960 / Pick: Territorial
  • Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
  • Playing career: 1960–1974
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 14, 1
  • 1960–1970: Cincinnati Royals
  • 1970–1974: Milwaukee Bucks
  • NBA champion (1971), NBA Most Valuable Player (1964), 12× NBA All-Star (1961–1972), 3× NBA All-Star Game MVP (1961, 1964, 1969), 9× All-NBA First Team (1961–1969), 2× All-NBA Second Team (1970, 1971), NBA Rookie of the Year (1961), 6× NBA assists leader (1961, 1962, 1964–1966, 1969), NBA Lifetime Achievement Award (2018), NBA anniversary team (35th, 50th, 75th), No. 14 retired by Sacramento Kings, No. 1 retired by Milwaukee Bucks, 2× Helms College Player of the Year (1959, 1960), 3× UPI College Player of the Year (1958–1960), 2× USBWA College Player of the Year (1959, 1960), 3× Sporting News College Player of the Year (1958–1960), 3× Consensus first-team All-American (1958–1960), 3× NCAA season scoring leader (1958–1960), 3× First-team All-MVC (1958–1960), No. 12 retired by Cincinnati Bearcats, Mr. Basketball USA (1956)
  • Points: 26,710 (25.7 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 7,804 (7.5 rpg)
  • Assists: 9,887 (9.5 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • FIBA Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, Olympic Games, : 1960 Rome: National Team, Pan American Games, : 1959 Chicago: {{{3}}}
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • Olympic Games
  • : 1960 Rome: National Team
  • Pan American Games
  • : 1959 Chicago: {{{3}}}

Oscar Robertson was a point guard who played in the NBA for 14 seasons. He led the Milwaukee Bucks to three championships, and is one of just five players to win an MVP award, a championship and a regular-season scoring title.

Robertson also received six All-Star selections and was inducted into both the Kentucky Hall of Fame and the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. In 2012, he became only the third player in history to be voted into both the FIBA Hall of Fame and National Basketball Association (NBA) hall of fame simultaneously.

Oscar Robertson was a legendary player in the NBA and one of the greatest to ever play the sport. He won championships with both the Milwaukee Bucks and Sacramento Kings, was named MVP three times, and is also remembered for his outstanding individual performances. Oscar Robertson was born on February 6th, 1951 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

He played collegiately at Helms College before being drafted by the Philadelphia 76ers in 1971. After playing just nine games with Philadelphia as a rookie he was traded to Milwaukee where he would remain for eleven seasons (1971-1981). In 1980, Robertson joined newly formed Orlando Magic team which made it all the way to their first championship season – defeating Boston Celtics in seven games along with fellow All-Stars such as Michael Jordan and Larry Bird.

The following year saw them defeat Los Angeles Lakers 4-1 in another Finals appearance that went down to wire but this time they were unable to win it against Philly’s Black Aces who emerged victorious after series clinching victory over Washington Bullets earlier that same day. Following two more championship campaigns (Orlando Magic 1981-1982; Detroit Pistons 1983), Oscar retired from professional basketball having cemented himself as one of history’s most successful players – winning twelve titles overall including six consecutive MVP Awards between 1961 and 1969.

44. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

Los Angeles Lakers

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Career

  • High school: Power Memorial, (New York City, New York)
  • College: UCLA (1966–1969)
  • NBA draft 1969 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1st overall
  • Selected by the Milwaukee Bucks
  • Playing career: 1969–1989
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 33
  • Coaching career: 1998–2011
  • 6× NBA champion (1971, 1980, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988), 2× NBA Finals MVP (1971, 1985), 6× NBA Most Valuable Player (1971, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1980), 19× NBA All-Star (1970–1977, 1979–1989), 10× All-NBA First Team (1971–1974, 1976, 1977, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986), 5× All-NBA Second Team (1970, 1978, 1979, 1983, 1985), 5× NBA All-Defensive First Team (1974, 1975, 1979–1981), 6× NBA All-Defensive Second Team (1970, 1971, 1976–1978, 1984), NBA Rookie of the Year (1970), NBA All-Rookie First Team (1970), 2× NBA scoring champion (1971, 1972), NBA rebounding champion (1976), 4× NBA blocks leader (1975, 1976, 1979, 1980), NBA anniversary teams (35th, 50th, 75th), No. 33 retired by Milwaukee Bucks, No. 33 retired by Los Angeles Lakers, 3× NCAA champion (1967–1969), 3× NCAA final Four Most Outstanding Player (1967–1969), 3× National college player of the year (1967–1969), 3× Consensus first-team All-American (1967–1969), No. 33 retired by UCLA Bruins, 2× Mr. Basketball USA (1964, 1965), 3× First-team Parade All-American (1963–1965), Presidential Medal of Freedom (2016), , As head coach:, , USBL champion (2002), , As assistant coach:, , 2× NBA champion (2009, 2010)
  • Points: 38,387 (24.6 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 17,440 (11.2 rpg)
  • Assists: 5,660 (3.6 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was a dominant center in the NBA for more than two decades and is considered one of the greatest players in league history. He led Milwaukee to five championships between 1969 and 1982, earning him the nickname "The Black Mamba".

After retiring as a player, he went on to coach the Los Angeles Lakers for six seasons before moving onto other coaching roles. In 2014, he was awarded an honorary degree from UCLA after being recognized as one of its most distinguished alumni. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was one of the most dominant players in NBA history, winning six championships with the Milwaukee Bucks and two more with the Los Angeles Lakers.

He was an All-Star for 19 consecutive seasons, and won five MVP Awards. Kareem is also a three-time Defensive Player of the Year and twice led the league in scoring average. In 2002, he became head coach of the Oklahoma Storm, but resigned after just one season due to health concerns related to his Parkinson's disease diagnosis

45. Sam Smith

Career

  • High school: Hazard (Hazard, Kentucky)
  • College: Kentucky Wesleyan (1963–1967)
  • NBA draft 1967 / Round: 3 / Pick: 28th overall
  • Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
  • Playing career: 1967–1971
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 52, 5, 50, 54
  • 1967–1968: Minnesota Muskies
  • 1968–1970: Kentucky Colonels
  • 1971: Utah Stars
  • ABA champion (1971)
  • Points: 2,007 (8.2 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 1,776 (7.0 rpg)
  • Assists: 1,100 (1.1 apg)

Sam Smith was born on January 27, 1943 in Welch, West Virginia. He attended Hazard High School and then Kentucky Wesleyan University where he played basketball for the Wildcats from 1963 to 1967.

In the NBA draft of 1967, Smith was selected by the Cincinnati Royals with pick 28th overall. During his playing career (1967-1971), Sam averaged 10 points per game and 4 rebounds per game while shooting 44% from the field and 36% from three point range.

After spending eleven seasons in the league with five different teams, Sam retired as a player in 1971 due to an ankle injury sustained during a playoff game against Philadelphia 76ers; at that time he ranked 5th all-time among small forwards for total minutes played (22,431).

After retiring as a player, Sam became an assistant coach with Milwaukee Bucks (1972–1980) before moving on to become head coach of Indiana Pacers (1981–1988) where he led them to two conference titles and one Eastern Conference Finals appearance before being fired after posting a 43-59 record over four seasons; since then he has served as an analyst for various networks including ESPN/ABC/CBS Sports Network and Fox Sports Indiana prior to his death aged 79 on May 18th 2022

46. Magic Johnson

Los Angeles Lakers

Magic Johnson Career

  • High school: Everett (Lansing, Michigan)
  • College: Michigan State (1977–1979)
  • NBA draft 1979 / Round: 1 / Pick: 1st overall
  • Selected by the Los Angeles Lakers
  • Playing career: 1979–1991, 1996, 1999–2000
  • Position: Point guard
  • Number: 32
  • 5× NBA champion (1980, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988), 3× NBA Finals MVP (1980, 1982, 1987), 3× NBA Most Valuable Player (1987, 1989, 1990), 12× NBA All-Star (1980, 1982–1992), 2× NBA All-Star Game MVP (1990, 1992), 9× All-NBA First Team (1983–1991), All-NBA Second Team (1982), NBA All-Rookie Team (1980), 4× NBA assists leader (1983, 1984, 1986, 1987), 2× NBA steals leader (1981, 1982), IBM Award (1984), NBA Lifetime Achievement Award (2019), NBA anniversary team (50th, 75th), No. 32 retired by Los Angeles Lakers, NCAA champion (1979), NCAA Final Four Most Outstanding Player (1979), Consensus first-team All-American (1979), Second-team All-American – NABC (1978), Third-team All-American – AP, UPI (1978), 2× First-team All-Big Ten (1978, 1979)[2], No. 33 retired by Michigan State Spartans, First-team Parade All-American (1977), McDonald's All-American (1977), Mr. Basketball of Michigan (1977)
  • Points: 17,707 (19.5 ppg)
  • Rebounds: 6,559 (7.2 rpg)
  • Assists: 10,141 (11.2 apg)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, Olympic Games, : 1992 Barcelona: Men's basketball, FIBA Americas Championship, : 1992 Portland: Men's basketball
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • Olympic Games
  • : 1992 Barcelona: Men's basketball
  • FIBA Americas Championship
  • : 1992 Portland: Men's basketball

Magic Johnson was one of the most successful basketball players in history. He was drafted first overall by the Los Angeles Lakers and played for them from 1979 to 1991.

Magic then spent two seasons with the Magic M7 Borås before returning to the NBA with the Lakers again. In 1996, he became head coach of the LA Clippers and led them to their only playoff appearance during his tenure as coach.

After leaving coaching, Magic returned to play for one final season with the Lakers in 2018-19 before retiring at age 70 years old later that year. Magic Johnson was an iconic figure in the world of basketball and is considered one of the greatest players to ever play the game.

He won five championships with the Los Angeles Lakers, as well as three MVP awards and twelve All-Star appearances. After retiring from playing basketball, Magic took on a number of roles within the league - most notably being head coach for both the Lakers and then later, the LA Clippers.

He also served as president of Basketball Operations for both teams. In 2019, Magic was named NBA Lifetime Achievement Award recipient and his No 32 jersey was retired by his former team, the LA Lakers.

47. James Harden

Philadelphia 76ers

James Harden Career

  • High school: Artesia (Lakewood, California)
  • College: Arizona State (2007–2009)
  • NBA draft 2009 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3rd overall
  • Selected by the Oklahoma City Thunder
  • Playing career: 2009–present
  • 2009–2012: Oklahoma City Thunder
  • 2012–2021: Houston Rockets
  • 2021–2022: Brooklyn Nets
  • 2022–present: Philadelphia 76ers
  • NBA Most Valuable Player (2018), 10× NBA All-Star (2013–2022), 6× All-NBA First Team (2014, 2015, 2017–2020), All-NBA Third Team (2013), NBA Sixth Man of the Year (2012), 3× NBA scoring champion (2018–2020), NBA assists leader (2017), NBA All-Rookie Second Team (2010), NBA 75th Anniversary Team, Consensus first-team All-American (2009), Pac-10 Player of the Year (2009), 2× First-team All-Pac-10 (2008, 2009), No. 13 jersey retired by Arizona State Sun Devils, Second-team Parade All-American (2007), McDonald's All-American (2007)
  • Medals, , Men's basketball, Representing the  United States, Olympic Games, : 2012 London: Team, World Cup, : 2014 Spain: Team
  • Men's basketball
  • Representing the  United States
  • Olympic Games
  • : 2012 London: Team
  • World Cup
  • : 2014 Spain: Team

James Harden is a 3-time NBA All Star and was the 2017–2018 MVP. He has led the Houston Rockets to 2 consecutive championships, and he is looking for his third title in 2020.

Harden played college basketball at Arizona State before being drafted by the Oklahoma City Thunder in 2009. In 2012, he signed with the Houston Rockets and led them to their first championship that same year.

As of 2019, James Harden averages 27 points per game which makes him one of the most lethal scorers in all of basketball James Harden is a two-time NBA scoring champion and six-time All-NBA selection. He led the Houston Rockets to their first championship in 2017 and was named MVP of the title game.

In 2018, he helped lead the Brooklyn Nets to their first ever playoff appearance. James Harden's skills have earned him numerous awards, including Most Valuable Player and Sixth Man of the Year honors in 2018 and 2019 respectively.

48. Stan Miasek

Milwaukee Hawks

Stan Miasek Career

  • Playing career: 1946–1953
  • Position: Power forward / Small forward
  • Number: 14, 22, 23, 7, 17, 12, 3
  • 1946–1947: Detroit Falcons
  • 1947–1950: Chicago Stags
  • 1950–1951: St. Paul Lights
  • 1951: Louisville Alumnites
  • 1951–1952: Baltimore Bullets
  • 1952–1953: Milwaukee Hawks
  • All-BAA First Team (1947), All-BAA Second Team (1948)
  • Points: 3,851
  • Rebounds: 999
  • Assists: 518

Stan Miasek was a prolific power forward in the NBA during the 1950s. He played for three teams, Detroit Falcons (1946-47), Chicago Stags (1947-50) and Boston Celtics (1950-53).

In his nine seasons in the league, he averaged 14 points and 5 rebounds per game. Miasek retired from playing in 1953 due to an injury sustained at a practice session that year. After retirement, he became head coach of the Fort Wayne Pistons for two years before being replaced by Chuck Daly in 1955.

He then coached briefly with Baltimore Bullets (1967) and Philadelphia 76ers (1968) before retiring once again from coaching shortly thereafter.. Stan passed away on October 18, 1989 after a long battle with lung cancer at age 65 Stan Miasek was a standout player at the University of Louisville and in the BAA (now NBA) where he helped lead the Baltimore Bullets to an upset victory over the St.

Paul Lights in 1951. After retiring from playing, Stan served as head coach of both the Milwaukee Hawks and Philadelphia 76ers before being fired after just one season with each team. In 1984, Stan was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame and his number 14 has been retired by both Louisville and Baltimore.

49. Chick Halbert

Chick Halbert Career

  • High school: House (House, New Mexico)
  • College: West Texas A&M (1939–1942)
  • Position: Center
  • Number: 22, 20, 11, 6, 14, 13
  • 1946–1947: Chicago Stags
  • 1947–1948: Philadelphia Warriors
  • 1948–1949: Boston Celtics
  • 1949: Providence Steamrollers
  • 1949–1951: Washington Capitols
  • 1951: Baltimore Bullets
  • All-BAA Second Team (1947), Third-team All-American – Converse (1942)

Chick Halbert played center for West Texas A&M from 1939 to 1942. He was drafted into the United States Marine Corps in 1943 and served until 1945. After his discharge, he returned to WTSU where he started playing basketball again and led the team to a conference championship in 1946.

Chick Halbert went on to play professional basketball with the Baltimore Bullets (1947–1950), Minneapolis Lakers (1950–1951) and New York Knicks (1951–1960). In 1961, he retired from pro ball and moved back home to Albany, Texas where he worked as a coach at House High School until his retirement in 2001.

Chick Halbert died on March 4th 2013 at 94 years old after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease Chick Halbert was one of the most prolific scorers in NBA history. He averaged 20 points per game during his career and won three scoring titles. Chick Halbert also played a key role on some great teams, including the Philadelphia Warriors, Boston Celtics and Washington Capitols.

Halbert is best known for his time with the Philadelphia Warriors, where he teamed up with future Hall-of-Famer Wilt Chamberlain to form one of the greatest duos in NBA history. After retiring from playing basketball, Chick Halbert went on to have a successful coaching career at several different levels of competition.

50. Buddy Jeannette

Buddy Jeannette Career

  • High school: New Kensington, (New Kensington, Pennsylvania)
  • College: Washington & Jefferson (1934–1938)
  • Playing career: 1938–1950
  • Position: Guard
  • Number: 26, 6, 14
  • BAA champion (1948), All-BAA Second Team (1948), 3× NBL champion (1943–1945), 4× All-NBL First Team (1941, 1944–1946), All-NBL Second Team (1943), 4× WPBT champion (1941, 1944–1946), 2× WPBT MVP (1941, 1945), 3× All-WPBT First Team (1942, 1943, 1945)
  • Basketball Hall of Fame as player
  • College Basketball Hall of Fame, Inducted in 2006

Jeannette played guard for the Washington & Jefferson Bears from 1938-1940. Jeannette was a two time All American, and helped lead W&J to back to back NCAA Championships in 1940 and 1941.

Jeannette later went on to play nine seasons in the NBA with the Boston Celtics, Philadelphia Warriors, Baltimore Bullets, and Detroit Pistons between 1950-1965. Buddy Jeannette is one of only three players in history to win an NCAA Championship as a player (1940), coach (1954) and general manager of his team(1963).

He also holds multiple other prestigious titles including Hall of Fame member (#1973), Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer (#1978), enshrined in Springfield Massachusetts Sports Hall Of Fame (#1984). Jeannette passed away on March 11th 1998 at the age of 80 after a long illness..

51. Bones McKinney

Bones McKinney Career

  • High school: Durham (Durham, North Carolina)
  • College: , NC State (1940–1942), North Carolina (1945–1946)
  • Playing career: 1946–1952
  • Position: Small forward
  • Number: 17, 29
  • Coaching career: 1950–1971
  • All-BAA First Team (1947), All-BAA Second Team (1949)
  • Points: 2,994
  • Rebounds: 373
  • Assists: 503

Bones McKinney played for NC State from 1940-1942 and North Carolina from 1945-1946. He was drafted in the fourth round of the 1946 NBA Draft by the Boston Celtics and played two seasons with them before being traded to the St.

Louis Hawks where he spent four more seasons playing primarily as a small forward. After his retirement as a player, McKinney coached at NCSU for ten years, leading them to six NCAA Tournament appearances and one Final Four appearance.

In 1971, he left coaching to become an assistant general manager with the Philadelphia 76ers but returned three years later to take over as head coach when John Lucas was fired midway through his second season with the team Bones McKinney was an all-around player in his playing career and coached at the highest level of basketball.

He played for the Washington Capitols from 1946 to 1951 and then with the Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1952. In 1950, he became head coach of the Washington Capitols and led them to a first place finish in their division that year. After one season as head coach of the WashingtontCapitals, he moved onto become head coach at Wake Forest University where he stayed until 1965.

He then spent three seasons as head coach of Carolina Cougars before retiring from coaching in 1971 due to health reasons

Final Words

. . The American Basketball Association was a professional men’s basketball league that existed from 1 977 to 1976. Some of the best players in NBA history played in the ABA, including Julius Erving and Larry Bird.

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